Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Nanotek and Expo Hampton Inn Tropicana Las Vegas, USA .

Day 2 :

  • Track 3: Nanomedicine (Session 1)
Location: Salon A
Speaker

Chair

Julia Y. Ljubimova

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Thomas J. Webster

Northeastern University, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Haruo Sugi has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 28 years from the University of Tokyo. He worked in Columbia University and the National institutes of Health from 1965 to 1967. He was Professor in Physiology in Teikyo University from 1973 to 2004, when he became Emeritus Professor.

Abstract:

Although more than 60 years have passed since the monumental discovery that muscle contraction results from relative sliding between actin and myosin filaments, which is in turn produced by the powerstroke of myosin heads extending from myosin filaments, the mechanism of the myosin head powerstroke, coupled with ATP hydrolysis, still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. As early as 1997, we started to directly record ATP-induced powerstroke in individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments electron microscopically using the gas environmental chamber (EC), in which biological specimens are separated from high vacuum of electron microscope by a thin carbon insulating film, and established techniques for recording ATP-induced movement of individual myosin head, position-marked with antibody and gold particles using the EC (Sugi et al., PNAS 1997). With these techniques, we could record ATP-induced myosin head recovery stroke (amplitude ∼7 nm) in hydrated myosin filaments in the absence of actin filaments. Recently, we have challenged to record the powerstroke of individual myosin heads in hydrated mixture of actin and myosin filaments, and have found that the amplitude of powerstroke is ∼3 nm at the distal region, and ∼2 nm at the proximal region of myosin head catalytic domain in the isometric condition, i.e. the condition in which gross myofilament sliding does not take place. This finding indicates flexibility of myosin head catalytic domain, contrary to the genral view that the catalytic domain is rigid.

Julia Y. Ljubimova

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA

Title: New class of nanomedicines to image and treat primary and metastatic tumors

Time : 09:40-10:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ljubimova J. Y is a Professor and Director of Nanomedicine Research Center at the Department of Neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. She works on clinical and basic cancer research in her entire career. The major interest is the differential cancer gene expression as a tool for finding novel/early markers of cancer development, and for working out new nanomedicine drugs against these tumor targets for treatment and/or imaging. One of the novel markers, the structural tumor vessel wall protein laminin-411, is currently in a clinical trial as a prognostic and diagnostic marker for human glial tumor progression. These discoveries led to the development of new technologies for drug delivery and engineering of the new class of anti-cancer nanomedicine drugs. Currently her research is supported by three NIH/NCI, private and industry grants. She is the author of over 70 publications, reviews and book chapters as well as an inventor on nine patents and patent applications.

Abstract:

Nanopolymers are highly promising vehicles for multi-targeting and can provide molecular combination therapy and thus, personalized therapy based on specific marker expression profiles. In our work, a natural nanobiopolymer, polymalic acid (PMLA), was used as a nanoplatform for the family of PolycefinTM drugs to treat primary and metastatic tumors. Treatment efficacy was examined in treatment of primary brain and breast and metastatic tumors with polymer-attached antisense oligonucleotides (AON) to four molecular markers: α and β laminin, EGFR, HER2 and tumor-specific corresponding monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to either EGFR (cetuximab) or HER2 (herceptin), and transferrin receptor (TfR) for delivery through mouse endothelial system including brain blood and tumor barriers (BBB/BTB). In brain tumors treated with polycefin nanobiopolymer bearing AON against chains of tumor vascular protein, laminin-411, the vascular area was significantly decreased and tumor size was reduced 10-fold. For HER2-positive primary breast cancer, more than 90% growth inhibition was achieved in vivo in a mouse model using polycefin-attached HER2 AON. Treatment of primary TNBC by another Polycefin version, where PMLA had anti-TfR mAb for transcytosis, nucleosome-related antigen binding 2C5 mAb for tumor cell targeting, and anti-EGFR AON to block tumor cell growth, also led to a significant reduction of tumor size. Polymer-treated tumors exhibited significant cell apoptosis identified by the cleaved PARP method. Polycefin drugs were also used to treat brain metastases. Animal survival after Polycefin treatment of lung metastasis, HER2- positive breast cancer and TNBC was significantly: 65% for lung cancer, 47% for HER2-positive breast cancer, and 81% for TNBC. Overall, these nanoconjugates showed significant anti-tumor activity to treat primary cancers and metastases to the brain.

Thomas J. Webster

Northeastern University, USA

Title: From nanotechnology to picotechnology: What is on the horizon?

Time : 10:00-10:20

Speaker
Biography:

Thomas J. Webster’s (H index: 50) degrees are in chemical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh (B.S., 1995) and in biomedical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (M.S., 1997; Ph.D., 2000). He is currently the Department Chair and Professor of Chemical Engineering at Northeastern University in Boston. He has graduated/supervised over 109 visiting faculty, clinical fellows, post-doctoral students, and thesis completing B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. students. His lab group has generated over 9 textbooks, 48 book chapters, 306 invited presentations, at least 403 peer-reviewed literature articles, at least 567 conference presentations, and 32 provisional or full patents. Some of these patents led to the formation of 9 companies.

Abstract:

Inspired from biological systems, nanotechnology is beginning to revolutionize (and in many cases already has) revolutionized medicine including improved prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of numerous diseases. This talk will summarize efforts over the past decades that have synthesized novel nanoparticles, nanotubes, and other nanomaterials to improve medicine. Efforts focused on the use of nanomaterials to minimize immune cell interactions, inhibit infection, and increase tissue growth will be especially emphasized. Tissue systems covered will include the nervous system, orthopedics, bladder, cardiovascular and vascular. Due to complications translating in vitro to in vivo results, only in vivo studies will be emphasized here. Materials to be covered will include ceramics, metals, polymers, and composites thereof. Self-assembled nano-chemistries will also be emphasized. As the FDA has now approved several nanomaterials for medical applications, recent results from FDA trials will also be discussed. Importantly, this talk will also discuss what further advances we can make in medicine by using picotechnology compared to nanotechnology. In summary, this talk will provide the latest information concerning the design and use of numerous nanomaterials in regenerative medicine while highlighting what is necessary for this field to continue to grow through the exploration of picotechnology.

Break: Coffee Break 10:20-10:35@ Bora Foyer

Joao Rodrigues

Universidade da Madeira, Portugal

Title: Dendrimers and metallodendrimers for biomedical applications: A recent overview

Time : 10:35-10:55

Speaker
Biography:

João Rodrigues got the Ph.D. on Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Lisbon (Portugal). He is Scientific Coordinator of CQM-Centro de Química da Madeira, head of the MMRG-Molecular Materials Research Group and Director of the Master in Nanochemistry and Nanomaterials at the University of Madeira (Portugal). His scientific work has been mainly devoted to the preparation and characterization of potential useful molecular materials, namely dendritic (hyperbranched), polymeric metal-containing systems and nanoparticles, to be used as electronic and/or biomedical nanomaterials. He is author of 33 peer-reviewed articles (h=11), 1 book chapter, 9 proceeding papers, 13 invited lectures in international conferences and 50 other oral presentations.

Abstract:

Dendrimers and metallodendrimers are a class of compounds related with the large family of hyperbranched polymers. However, dendrimers are 3D monodisperse molecular (nano) architectures, formed by three basic structural units: The core, branching units and terminal groups, each of which determine the properties of the dendrimers such as the size, shape, nature of the interior of the dendrimer, the capacity to encapsulate other molecules/nanoparticles, and the hydrophilicity or lipophilicity of the dendritic system. Their versatility and possibility of customization made them particularly interesting for biomedical applications and motive of interest from academia and companies all over the world. Also, the development of polynuclear metal complexes, such as metallodendrimers proved to be a good option for biomedical applications e.g. as anticancer drug candidates. Surprisingly, in the last two decades, only a few examples of metallodendrimers with potential application as anticancer drugs were reported, and most of them used diaminobutane polypropylene imine (DAB-PPI) or poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM) as cores. In this communication we will overview the most important contributions to the area, highlighting our recent work on PAMAM dendrimer derivatives for gene delivery into mesenchymal stem cells, and the use of poly(alkylidenamines) ruthenium based metallodendrimers as anticancer drug carriers.

M.G. Krukemeyer

Paracelsus-Hospital, Germany

Title: Nanotechnology in liver cancer

Time : 10:55-11:15

Biography:

Manfred George Krukemeyer M.D., is a Doctor of medicine, lecturer of surgery, citizen of Germany, Paracelsus-Hospital Osnabrueck, Department Radio-Oncology, Germany. He did his study of Medicine from University of Vienna, Medical School, Austria, University of Kiel and University of Bonn, Medical School, Germany, 1982-1989, Department of Internal Medicine University of New York, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, USA, 1988. Priztker School of Medicine University of Illinois, Department of Abdominal and Transplant Surgery, Chicago, USA, 1988. He did his resident of surgery 1991, from University of Düsseldorf, Medical School, Humboldt University of Berlin, Medical School, Germany, Department of Surgery Raphaels Hospital Münster, Germany, teaching hospital of University of Münster, Medical School, Germany. He is a board approved certified Surgeon, Emergency Medicine Physician and Nutritionist. His research focuses on oncology, nanomedicine and transplantation. He has more than 50 publications in international papers, publication of 6 books, lectures about surgery and oncology in Germany, Europe, America and China, member of national and international teams of specialists in surgery and oncology.

Abstract:

Therapies of liver tumors display diverse treatment alternatives. The administration of cytostatics coupled with and without iron oxides (Fe3O4) has been presented in an experimental series with 36 animals with prior implantation of an R1H rhabdomyosarcoma in the liver, since iron undergoes selective phagocytosis in the liver. In group I, mitoxantrone is injected into the lateral tail vein of the animals (n=12) in a dosage of 1 mg/kg of body weight. Group III (n=12 animals) received mitoxantrone coupled with iron oxide (Fe3O4), and Group II (n=12 animals) received NaCl, in the same dosage for all groups. In the sonography and in the measurement of the volume, a significantly smaller tumor growth is found in group ii compared with group I and III. The volume was measured manually postmortally in mm3 (length x breadth x height). The tumor volume showed the lowest growth in group II, which was treated with mitoxantrone-coupled iron oxides. 3 animals from group II died. The autopsy revealed no indication of the cause of death. There were neither thromboses nor allergic reactions in any of the animals. It can be clearly seen that group I has a smaller mean volume and less scatter than group II. The mean of group I is also below that of group II.

Buket Aksu

Santa Farma Pharmaceuticals, Turkey

Title: Quality by design approach for tablet formulations and flexible regulatory approach

Time : 11:15-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Buket Aksu has completed his Ph.D. from the Ege University (Turkey) & Bradford University (UK) and postdoctoral studies from Istanbul University School of Pharmacy. She has also completed her Post Graduate degree on Management and Organization Department in the field of Social Sciences. She is the Corporate Relations Director of Santa Farma Pharmaceuticals. She has given 49 scientific, 32 social conferences and has 8 scientific publications and 39 posters at national and international levels. She has attended more than 90 national and 45 international meetings.

Abstract:

Pharmaceutical product development knowledge is intensive and the product development process is quite complex. Recently, the drug industry has experienced major developments including nanotechnology, in production information, quality management systems and risk management and has developed modern production tools that can assist in ensuring the production quality. Quality by Design (QbD) studies are applied in the pharmaceutical industry since 2004. The first step of its implementation started with the process analytical technologies guideline, which was followed by the Q8, Q9, Q10 and Q11 guidelines. During the multi-parameter processes of pharmaceutical production, it is necessary to make different variations in either the formulation or the process. However, these variations cannot be performed without permission from the pharmaceutical regulatory authorities. Design space (DS) is a production space provided by the control of critical parameters that are determined by the formulation and manufacturing process. In addition, working within this DS is not considered a change. To evaluate the QbD principles, Ramipril was used as a model drug and direct compression tablets were designed with the application of INForm v.4 ANN. The results of the tablets containing respectively MgSt and SSF were evaluated by the program. With reference to the data obtained, all required measurements and evaluations were performed and the critical quality attributes were determined upon risk control. And to demonstrate the flexibility of post-approval changes on ramipril tablets, which contain components from three different active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturers, within the scope of the DS.

Fernando Palacio

Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Spain

Title: Multifunctional nanoplatform for biomedical applications

Time : 11:35-11:55

Biography:

Fernando Palacio is Professor of Research of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) at the Materials Research Institute in Zaragoza and member of the Department of Condensed Matter Physics of the University of Zaragoza. He is also the Vice-Chairman of the European Institute of Molecular Magnetism. He did his graduation in Chemistry and gained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Zaragoza. Postdoctoral stays at the University of Oxford and the University of Illinois in Chicago. Part of his research activity deals with the study of magnetic nanoparticles prepared as multifunctional synthetic platforms and the development of their ferrofluids. He is currently interested in understanding their magnetism and in their biomedical applications.

Abstract:

Nanotechnology enables addressing challenges otherwise difficult to reach, like the simultaneous diagnostic and therapies using the same material. Here we present a multifunctional synthetic platform consisting on a hydrophobic polymer that may be used as a matrix for the encapsulation of inorganic nanoparticles (magnetic, luminescent, and radioactive). The matrix contains a Michael-donor (or an acceptor) on its surface for functionalization. Organic bioactive molecules are attached to one end of a hydrophilic polymer (i.e. PEG) terminated on a Michael acceptor (or a donor), and then they are anchored to the hydrophobic core by Michael addition. This system has the advantages of a clean synthesis (no by-products), mild conditions, and an easy and controlled multifunctionalization. So far, we have incorporated to this platform: magnetic nanoparticles, radioactive substituents, optical dyes (fluorescein and rhodamine), a therapeutical drug, an antibody, and an optical thermometer made of lanthanide complexes. Health safety of the system has been tested in cellular and in vivo assays. The nanoplatform is highly stable in biological fluids, shows low cell toxicity, high capacity of cell internalization, excellent hematocompatibility, and anticoagulation properties. It is shown that magnetic properties can be tuned up in the whole superparamagnetic range. Moreover, the system has shown excellent performance in magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia.

Andreia Ascenso

Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

Title: Carrier-mediated dermal delivery for prevention or treatment of skin disorders

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Andreia Ascenso has completed her Master’s degree and her Ph.D. from Lisbon University. She is a Professor of Pharmaceutics in Lisbon University School of Pharmacy. She has published 7 papers in reputed international journals, 15 posters (including one prizewinner), and participated in 7 national and international oral communications. She has been invited to review 9 manuscripts in reputed international journals.

Abstract:

Dermal delivery after topical application of actives has gained increased interest and development due to the lower risk of systemic side effects. In particular, for antioxidants skin delivery, the search for a new delivery system that, simultaneously, preserves the antioxidant stability and enhances its deposition on the skin, opened a new chapter in drug delivery design. Since epidermal lipids are predominantly found within the penetration skin barrier (stratum corneum), topically applied lipid nanocarriers, allowing lipid interaction between the skin outermost layer and the carrier, appear promising. Nanocarriers, such as liposomes and cyclodextrins, have successfully enhanced the clinical efficiency of several drugs. More recently, specially designed carriers have claimed the ability to cross the skin intact and deliver the loaded drugs into the systemic circulation, being at the same time responsible for the percutaneous absorption of the drug within the skin. These carriers were firstly introduced as transfersomes®, and this denomination as well as deformable vesicles, were used to differentiate them from the conventional liposomes. The highly flexible membranes are the result of combining into a single structure phospholipids and an edge-active component in order to give to transfersomes the necessary deformability to move spontaneously into the skin, delivering the associated drugs dermal or systemically. Cyclodextrins are cyclic water-soluble, non-reducing and macrocycle carbohydrate polymers. Some derivatives, such as methylated-β-cyclodextrins are usually used for topical formulations. The aim of the research work was to use cyclodextrins and transfersomes, or their combination, as delivery systems for tretinoin and lycopene, and further investigate the resulting systems behavior in in vitro and in vivo conditions.

Break: Lunch Break 12:15-13:00 @ Coral AB
Speaker
Biography:

Sree Harsha Nagaraja received his Master of Pharmacy Degree and subsequently earned a doctorate in Pharmaceutics from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India in 2006. He came to King Faisal University in 1997 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, bringing with him several years’ worth of teaching experience in fundamentals of pharmaceutics and drug delivery systems. His primary area of focus is on pharmaceutical technology and novel/targeted drug delivery systems. He has contributed so far to 23 peerreviewed full papers on a variety of topics in lung targeting, topical drug delivery, and mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, also has contributed in writing a book chapter titled “Targeted Drug Delivery System” and “Microspheres” in Textbook of Industrial Pharmacy, Publisher-Orient Longman Private Ltd. In addition he is an Ad-hoc reviewer for scientific journals.

Abstract:

Background and Methods: A dual (immediate/sustained-release) oral omeprazole suspension was prepared as a innovative dosage form to eliminate Helicobacter pylori. Carbopol®-loaded omeprazole nanospheres might bind with the mucosal membrane after delivery to the stomach and could increase the efficacy of the treatment, providing both an instant and a sustained action. Objective: The aim of our study was to develop omeprazole nanospheres using a nano spray-dryer technique and to explore such features as their drug content, product yield, particle size, in vitro drug release, surface characteristics and stability. The nanospheres had a particle size range of 400-805 nm after optimizing the preparation method using a central composite design. The drug content and percentage yield was 88.8%±0.4% and 95.6%±0.4%, respectively. The in vitro release profile of the omeprazole nanospheres was reliable with a Peppas release pattern, and the release after one hour was 16%, while for the original drug, omeprazole, under the same experimental conditions, 91% was released in the first 0.5 hours. Conclusion: The nanospheres used in this study assisted controlled release of omeprazole over an extended period of time for up to 12 hours and the preparation was stable for 12 months.

Paula Melariri

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa

Title: Application of nanomedicine in the treatment of malaria

Time : 13:20-13:40

Speaker
Biography:

Melariri Paula completed her Ph.D. in 2010 at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. She is a Senior Researcher and malaria project manager in the Encapsulation and Drug Delivery group, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa. She is leading the research activities in developing novel nanomedicine treatments for malaria. She is passionate about neglected tropical diseases and infectious diseases of poverty. She has published several articles and is a reviewer to several journals.

Abstract:

Malaria is one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases. Each year over 1.5 million people die and an estimated 40% of the world’s population is at risk. Over 90% of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where on average a child dies of malaria every 12 seconds. Currently no effective vaccine against malaria is available. A major reason for the failure to eradicate malaria has been the shortcomings of malaria preventive and curative drug treatments. Nanomedicine is a new technology utilizing nanometre scale (generally 100 nm) drug delivery systems as therapeutics, able to confer advantages which include improved drug pharmacokinetic profiles (improved absorption, bioavailability, elimination half-life), organ, cell and parasite targeted drug delivery, and reduction in drug toxicity. Nanomedicine can address the challenges of current antimalarials, by reformulating the drugs in nanomedicine drug delivery systems (NMDDS). Nanomedicine has already impacted other diseases, e.g. cancer, exemplified by the reformulation of doxorubicin to provide a potent and extended half-life therapy with reduced side effects. Our vision is to see nanomedicine do the same for malaria chemotherapy, radically improving treatment outcomes using currently available drugs, saving lives, and advancing the global goal of eradicating malaria. Results from our preliminary studies in mice, using our novel NMDDS recorded significant enhancement, in the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs reformulated in NMDDS when compared to the non-formulated drugs.

Speaker
Biography:

Eliza Hutter obtained an MD degree at the Medical Institute in Leningrad (now St.Petersburg), Russia in 1991 and a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry in Clarkson University, USA (2001). She is a Research Associate at McGill University. Her research interests lie in the interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology, specifically, in the exploitation of localized surface plasmon of gold nanostructures for biological applications, such as sensing, imaging and drug delivery. She has published 23 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Although caspase-1 is a key participant in inflammation, there is no sensitive assay to measure its enzymatic activity in real time in cells or animals. We have prepared a ratiometric nanosensor for the measurement of this enzyme’s activity and demonstrated its functionality in vitro and in vivo. Our construct consists of CdSe(CdZnS) quantum dots functionalized by a fluorescently labeled short peptide containing the preferential substrate for the caspase-1, YVAD. Upon excitation, the transference of QD energy to the dye molecules (Rhodamine B) and the consequent emission is observed at the wavelength specific for the dye. After enzymatic cleavage of the peptide molecules, the rhodamine B (acceptor) molecules are liberated and the emission spectra changes back to that of the QDs. Monitoring the ratio between the emission peaks of QDs and fluorophores over time provides information on the rate of the enzyme activity. The nanosensor was successfully employed to assess caspase-1 enzymatic activity in vitro in microglia and in vivo in mice, during inflammation stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and LPS-QD nanoparticles. Results from these studies highlight how the unique properties of QDs can be used to create versatile biotools in the study of inflammation in real time in vivo.

  • Track 3: Nanomedicine (Session 2)
Location: Salon A
Speaker

Chair

Eggehard Holler

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

David K. Mills

Louisiana Tech University, USA

Session Introduction

Claudio Nicolini

University of Genova, Italy

Title: Mass spectrometry and florescence analysis of SNAP NAPPA arrays

Time : 14:00-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

Claudio Nicolini was born in Udine, Italy. He received the doctoral degree in physics from the University of Padua, in 1967. After serving as Adjunct Professor at the University of Bari, he moved for 17 years to the United States, of which he became citizen since 1974, and was originally at Brown University, MIT, and BNL. He then moved to Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, where after a period of intensive training and research in pathology he became Associate Professor of Pathology and then Professor and Chairman of the Biophysics in 1976. In 1985, he was called as “eminent scientist” to the Chair of Biophysics of the University of Genoa, in Italy until 2012, where he was successively Director of Biophysics Institute, DISTBIMO and CIRSDNNOB. From 1993 until now is Life President of the Fondazione ELBA Nicolini and of the Nanoworld Institute. On 2008, has been elected as a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and on 2010 Honoris Causa Professor of Biophysics and Nanobiotechnology at Moscow State University. He was Chief Editor of Cell Biophysics (USA) , Science and Technology Advisor to Italian Prime Minister Craxi, Member of the National Science and Technology Council upon Parliament election, Scientific Director Industrial Consortium CIREF, Founder Technobiochip; President Polo National Bioelectronics , President Scientific Technological Park of Elba Island. He received several awards and prizes and has authored more than 480 publications in international scientific journals (SCI), 35 patents (WPI), 28 books and Series Editor in Bioelectronics (Plenum) and Nanobiotechnology (Pan Stanford). His main scientific activities concerned cancer research, biophysics and nanotechnology, pioneering world-wide chromatin structure-function, bioelectronics and nanobiotechnology.

Abstract:

Results are here presented about the analysis of an improved version of an innovative kind of self-assembling protein microarray, the SNAP-NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array). For the first time NAPPA arrays have been expressed with a SNAP tag and expressed in an E. coli coupled cell-free expression system. The goal of our research is to develop a standardized nanotechnological procedure for clinical and basic applications able to analyze the protein-protein interactions occurred on SNAP-NAPPA array in a label free manner. For this aim we analyzed SNAP NAPPAs by two Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI TOF), namely a Voyager and an Ultraflex Bruker, and Liquid Chromatography- Electrospray Ionization (LC-ESI-MS) Mass Spectrometry and the results have been analyzed with the aid of a complex package of in house made software. A fluorescence analysis of SNAP NAPPA has been contemporarily performed, to fully characterize this new SNAP-NAPPA array.

Eggehard Holler

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA

Title: Polymaleic acid: Biology and drug delivery

Time : 14:20-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Eggehard Holler has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 27 years from Johann-Wolfgang Goethe University at Frankfurt/Main, Germany and his postdoctoral studies at Cornell University and UC Berkeley. He is Professor at University of Regensburg and at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. His scientific merits are in the fields of replication and protein synthesis, platinum anticancer mechanisms, biochemistry of myxomycetes, polymer chemistry and drug delivery. He is frontier in the design of targeted nanodrugsand treatment of tumors in brain and breast. He has contributed over 150 scientific articles and book chapters. Presently he holds position at Nanomedicine Research Center at Neurosurgical Department of CSMC.

Abstract:

Polymalic acid is a highly water soluble polyanion synthesized by the slime mold Physarum polycephalum for managing the synchrony of nuclear divisions in the growing polynucleated plasmodium. Alternating binding of replicative DNA polymerases and newly synthesized histones together with trafficking between nuclei are considered fundamental in the maintenance of the synchronous division cycle. Massively in excess produced polymer is highly purified from the culture medium and used as nanoscale platform for drug delivery. Being biodegradable, non-toxic, non-immunogenic, the polymer optimally qualifies as a nanoparticle platform. The polymer offers a large number of reactive carboxylates (900 per polymer of Mw 100,000) and a highly flexible architecture. A variety of interesting molecules such a chemotherapeutics, antisense oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides and polyethylene glycol (PEG) are covalently attached for targeted drug delivery, but also fluorescent molecules and DOTA-gadolinium(III) have been conjugated for imaging. Methods of physical, chemical and functional group analysis of the pharmaceutically pure all-in-one covalent nanodrug have been established, and biocompatibility including cytotoxicity and immunogenicity has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. All-in-one covalent contrast agents show favorable biodistribution by fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have been used for diagnosis of brain tumors in animal models. Delivery of drugs as inactive prodrugs and their activation at the site of treatment render the all-in-one covalent nanodrug a highly efficient and secure treatment modality.

David K. Mills

Louisiana Tech University, USA

Title: Clay nanotubes as growth factor delivery vehicle for bone tissue formation

Time : 14:40-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

David K. Mills received his Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of Illinois and joined the faculty at Louisiana Tech University in 1994. He holds a joint faculty appointment in the Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science and the School of Biological Sciences. He has over 50 papers published in national and international and has directed over 80 MS and Ph.D. students in the fields of Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Molecular Science and Nanotechnology. He is President of Organic Nano, a Louisiana company focused on the development and commercializing halloysite nanotube technology and bioactive polyelectrolyte multi-composite nanocoatings.

Abstract:

A wide variety of natural and synthetic materials (and combinations) have been used to bioengineer bone tissue. Growth factors have been supplied to progenitor cells in various forms to trigger a series of metabolic pathways leading to cellular proliferation, differentiation and functionality. The challenge is to supply these proteins, in the range of nano or even picograms, and in a sustained fashion over a period of time. Such a delivery system has yet to be developed. Alginate hydrogels are widely used to as a drug delivery system. We used halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) as carriers for the delivery of BMPs 2, 4 and 6, singly and in combination. Growth factors were vacuum loaded into HNTs and doped HNTs added to osteoblast-seeded alginate hydrogels. Cell proliferation, functionality and mineralization were observed over a 21-day period. Controls had unloaded HNTs dispersed within the alginate hydrogel. Halloysite nanoparticles showed a sustained release of all BMPs over a 21-day period with the dosage in picograms per milliliter. Increased collagen deposition, bone protein expression and formation of a mineralized matrix were observed that increased over the 21-day period. There was an increase in hydrogel material properties. Osteoblast proliferation, bone protein expression and mineralization in control cultures were reduced in comparison to experimental cultures. The data supports the potential use of a hydrogel-growth-factor doped HNT system as part of a novel osteogenic system that can deliver growth factors to the injured site (fracture, bone loss) and assist in bone repair.

Speaker
Biography:

Anton Liopo has a Ph.D. degree in Institute of Physiology from National Academy of Science of Belarus. His research interests in the past decade were focused on developing novel functional nanoparticles, which included gold nanorods, single-walled carbon nanotubes and polymeric nanoparticles, and their use for in vivo and in vitro applications. In TomoWave, his research interests focused on binding between bioactive molecules such as antibodies, peptides and high light absorption nanoparticles from different materials, shapes and constructions for cancer therapy, molecular and optoacoustic imaging and diagnostics. Now he has more than 50 peer-reviewed scientific articles.

Abstract:

We present gold nanorods (GNR) and hollow gold nanoshells (HGNS) as contrast agents for optoacoustic (OA) imaging, sensing, and laser ablation. Published methodology for the synthesis and surface modifications of GNR an HGNS (by pegylation, conjugation with monoclonal antibodies, or silicanization) were optimized and improved. The analysis of the modification of gold based contrast agents for in vivo and in vitro applications is detailed for GNR. A novel protocol has been developed to replace hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide on the surface of GNR with 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid and metoxy-poly (ethylene glycol)-thiol, and the monoclonal antibodies (mAb): HER2/neu and CD33, which overexpressed human breast tumor and leukemia cells, respectively. The efficiency of the modifications was quantified through measurement of the average number of antibodies per gold nanorod. The conjugates were investigated for different cells lines: normal human and animals cells, breast cancer cells and human leukemia lines, and in vivo applications (nude mice). Cytotoxicity analysis, optical imaging, and laser ablation all confirm strong targeting. Gold nanoshells were used as a new contrast-enhancing agent for optoacoustic tomography (OAT). By varying the relative thickness of the core and shell layers, the plasmon-derived optical resonance of gold can be shifted in wavelength from the visible region into the infrared. Silica core GNR and HGNS significantly enhanced OA imaging in vitro in comparison with pegylated particles where OAT system was used. This system was developed by TomoWave Laboratories for major biomedical applications including visualization of modified gold nanoparticles and sensing.

Break: Coffee Break 15:20-15:35@Bora Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Lali K. Medina-Kauwe received her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of California Los Angeles and completed postdoctoral studies in Gene Therapy Vector Development at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. She is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Associate Director of the Graduate Program in Biomedical and Translational Research. She has served on several NIH grant review panels related to gene and drug delivery. Her studies focus on developing targeted nanotherapies, some with both imaging and therapeutic capabilities, derived from the natural cell penetration and delivery properties of pathogens.

Abstract:

Elevation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor subunit 2 (HER2) characterizes HER2+ tumors. HER2 elevation amplifies tumor growth signaling, facilitating recalcitrance to standard therapies. Whereas HER2 inhibitors, trastuzumab and lapatinib, target HER2+ tumors by blocking HER2 signaling, up to 70% of cases resist or acquire resistance to these targeted therapies. Recent studies indicate that elevation of the HER2 dimerization partner, HER3, facilitates this resistance. We have developed HerGa and HerDox: nanobiological particles capable of targeting resistant tumors by binding HER3 and inducing rapid entry of toxic molecules into tumor cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and membrane penetration. These particles circumvent the need to modulate signaling. HerGa and HerDox are both comprised of the recombinant protein, HerPBK10, delivering a different toxic molecule: either a gallium corrole or doxorubicin, respectively. HerPBK10 is a fusion of the receptor binding domain of the HER ligand, heregulin, appended to a membrane penetration domain derived from the adenovirus capsid penton base protein. HerPBK10 binds HER3 and triggers rapid receptor-mediated endocytosis into endocytic vesicles via the heregulin domain. Vesicle escape and passage into the cytosol (necessary for cytotoxicity) is facilitated by the penton base domain. HerPBK10 also contains a positively-charged domain for binding anionic compounds. HerPBK10 can noncovalently self-assemble with either drug, forming 10-20 nm diameter round particles that are stable under different storage conditions and in blood. While HerGa and HerDox can target HER2+ tumors because HER2 elevation enhances HER3 affinity for heregulin, preference for drug resistant tumors is even higher due to HER3 elevation.

Goutam Ghosh

UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, India

Title: Role of counterions on protein conformational change in protein-nanoparticles interaction

Time : 15:55-16:15

Speaker
Biography:

Goutam Ghosh has received his Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of Chennai, India. He joined as a postdoctoral fellow in Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai, in 2000. He spent an year as a JAE-Doc, CSIC, postdoctoral fellow in the Insstitute of Advance Chemistry of Catalunia (IQAC), Barcelona, Spain, in the year 2010. He is a staff scientist in UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific research, Mumbai centre, India, since 2002. His present research interest is on the application of functional nano-materials biology and medicine. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed international journals.

Abstract:

The study of protein-nanoparticles interaction is an important research area due to possibility of applications of nanoparticles in medical diagnosis and treatments, cosmetics, and so on. In spite of a large number of publications in this research area, the basic understanding of the toxicity of nanoparticles in physiological environment is not yet achieved. As a result, applications of nanoparticles in biomedicine are being delayed. Among various possibilities hyperthermia treatment for cancer cell, contrast enhancement in MRI, targeted drug delivery are under consideration. Recently, we have investigated the role of counterions (both positive and negative) associated with the functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to the conformational change of the secondary structure of proteins in protein-nanoparticles electrostatic interaction. A model has been proposed which suggests a mechanism of attaching targeted proteins to the nanoparticle surface and delivering appropriate ions to modify their conformation. In this primary stage, we have studied this model for several proteins with varying isoelectric point (pI), conformation and molecular weight, and found useful. We are optimistic on future application of this model to repair denatured proteins to their functional conformation, and hence providing treatments to various diseases.

Biography:

Kerry J. Lee completed her Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from Old Dominion University. During her Ph.D. and postdoctoral research, she studied the design of in vitro and in vivo assays to study the transport, biocompatibility, and toxicity of different types of nanoparticles. She has published 10 first-author papers in peer-accepted journals, including ACS Nano, has more than 175 citations, and more than 17 selected presentations and conference abstracts. Kerry is currently assistant professor at South University and has expectations to continue her research using nanoparticle technology to identify and treat disease.

Abstract:

Multidrug membrane transporters, or efflux pumps, in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are responsible for nontreatment of a wide variety of diseases, ranging from bacterial infections to cancers, accounting for multidrug resistance (MDR). This makes it essential to study the structures and functions of the efflux pumps in order to have better understanding of how they work to aid in the design of more effective treatment therapies. In this study, we synthesized and purified spherical silver (Ag) NPs with diameters, ranging from 12 to 95 nm, that are stable (non-aggregated) in PBS (1.5 mM NaCl). We developed new imaging approaches using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS) to characterize single Ag NP sizedependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra in single living cells (Bacillus subtilis) in real-time at nanometer resolution. Using Ag NPs as optical probes, we continuously imaged and probed size-dependent transport kinetics of our efflux pump, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporter in Bacillus subtilis for hours and discovered the transport patterns. We showed that the smaller Ag NPs stayed inside the cells longer than the larger NPs, suggesting size-dependent efflux kinetics of the ABC membrane transporter. This study demonstrates that, unlike traditional fluorescent probes, single Ag NPs exhibit size-dependent LSPR spectra and superior photostability, which can serve as an effective assay to characterize the efflux kinetics of multidrug membrane transporters.

Erik N. Taylor

Northeastern University, USA

Title: Revolutionizing healthcare with anti-infection nanotechnology

Time : 16:35-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Growing up roaming the Texan prairies instilled in Erik an ambition to study humanity’s ability to not only co-exist with nature, but to flourish in accordance with Earth’s natural attributes. While one would be hard-pressed to find cattle navigating the roads of a contemporary American metropolis, micro-biotic life flourishes on subways, in apartment complexes, and even in the most allegedly sterile of environments – the modern hospital. Erik’s research is geared towards designing treatments for antibiotic resistant biofilms on medical devices. He uses nanotechnology to create novel interfaces promoting the natural elimination of biofilm. Erik received his Bachelor of Science from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. His senior design project was “An arthroscopic tool for the delivery of a thermo-sensitive hydrogel into damaged knee cartilage.” Erik’s research excellence wrought him an Office of the Vice President Undergraduate Research Fellowship for his work with Reese Endowed Professor Miguel Jose Yacaman in the Department of Chemical Engineering. Erik is currently a graduate student working towards his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Brown University. He is advised by the Graduate Director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering, Associate Professor Thomas J. Webster. Through Prof. Webster’s guidance and expertise, Erik is working on his thesis entitled “Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPION) for the Treatment of Implant Infection.” The Society for Biomaterials recently bestowed upon Erik the Student Travel Achievement Recognition (STAR) graduate student award one of its most prestigious graduate student honors for his exemplary work in nanotechnology.

Abstract:

Xu Chenjie

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Title: Self-care in keloid management with nanoparticles/microneedles for drug delivery

Time : 16-55-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Xu Chenjie received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 2009, focusing on biomedical applications of novel platforms of magnetic nanoparticles. From 2009-2012, he was a research associate at Harvard-MIT HST in the field of stem cell engineering and drug delivery. His main field of research is the biomedical application of functional nanoparticles. More specifically, he is interested in realizing the early detection, diagnosis, and costeffective treatment of major diseases at Asia with nanoparticle-related nanotechnology and. He has published 32 papers and filed 2 patents so far with 2400 citations and H-index of 18.

Abstract:

Keloids are proliferative fibrous growths that result from an excessive tissue response to skin trauma. They frequently persist at the site of injury, often recur after excision and always overgrow the boundaries of the original wound. Although they are benign with no malignant potential, disfigurement from keloids lead to considerable physical and psychological adverse effects. Keloids are more prevalent in young individuals (age 20-30) with darker skin pigmentation. Research from National University of Singapore also indicates that keloids are three times more common in Chinese patients than Caucasian patients. A variety of techniques have been utilized to treat keloids. However, all treatments are administered by clinicians, which require clinic visits by the patients and increase medical cost. Most of them are invasive and are fraught with pain during the treatment. For example, the current standard treatment of keloids with intralesional corticosteroid injections requires a prolonged treatment period at regular intervals of administration by physician. Today, self-care with miniaturized and automated devices are presenting as possible options in disease treatment. Responding to this trend, the ultimate goal of this project is to realize the self-administered treatment of keloids. Specifically, we intend to revolutionize the strategy in keloid treatment, by replacing the clinician-controlled drug administration with the patientmanageable drug delivery. We have built a prototype technology, in which skin-penetrating microneedles and drug-releasing nanoparticle are used to deliver drugs in a minimally invasive way for keloid treatment. This technology prevented the growth and proliferation of keloid fibroblast in a 3D skin model.

Fahima Dilnawaz

Laboratory of Nanomedicine, India

Title: Dual drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles for glioblastoma therapy

Time : 17:15-17:35

Speaker
Biography:

Fahima Dilnawaz is currently working as Women Scientist at Institute of Life Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. She has completed her Ph.D. from Utkal University and has 3 years of postgraduate teaching and more than 7 years of postdoctoral research experience. She has been working with different polymeric nanoparticle, magnetic nanoparticle based drug delivery system for the cancer therapy. Her current focus is towards theranostic approach of magnetic nanoparticles for an effective management of cancer especially the glioblastoma. To her credit she has published more than 15 papers and 5 book chapters in reputed journals and publishing house. She is also serving as reviewer for various nanomedicinal journals.

Abstract:

Glioblastomas are one of the most aggressive forms of brain tumors having high mortality rate which is a challenging disease to treat. The current therapy includes surgical resection, followed by the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The therapeutic limitation of glioblastoma is the presence of the blood brain barrier (BBB), which creates obstacles for many essential drugs to reach to the target site. Moreover, the common challenge of the drug delivery approach is to achieve a good therapeutic index. Currently nanotechnology mediated drug delivery system especially magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based drug delivery approach has been implemented to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drugs at the site of action owing to its magnetic inclination. Apart from that combination chemotherapy has been developed mainly in cancer treatment to minimize the dose and simultaneously to overcome the side effects of the high doses of the single drug. Therefore, in the present study for an effective treatment option of glioblastoma, Curcumin, a herbal drug and DNA methylating agent, Temozolomide was chosen for combinational therapy. The above two drugs were successfully encapsulated in a single formulation of the MNPs and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in 2-D and 3-D model of glioblastoma cell line (T-98G).

Sevgi Gungor

Istanbul University, Turkey

Title: Potential nanocarriers for topical skin delivery of drugs

Time : 17:35-17:55

Speaker
Biography:

Sevgi Güngör has completed her Ph.D. in 2001 and worked post-doctorate researcher at Istanbul University. She became a lecturer at Istanbul University Faculty of Pharmacy in 2004. She has also worked visiting scientist at University of Bath in between 2005-2006; 2007-2008. She has published 25 papers in peer reviewed journals, 4 book chapters in international books. She has given more than 45 oral and poster presentations in international conferences. Her research focuses of the enhancement of skin permeation of drugs with enhancers, colloidal nanocarriers, and iontophoresis; the characterization of skin transport mechanism of drugs; and the development of innovative topical & transdermal systems.

Abstract:

Nanotechnology is one of the most growing areas of scientific research. Recent advances in that area have led to the optimization of different types of nano-sized materials to various biomedical applications. Nanocarriers are increasingly being exploited to deliver drugs, cosmetic compounds, dyes, vaccines or gene fragments to specific cell targets for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. Skin offers an ideal application site to deliver therapeutic agents for both local and systemic actions. Topical therapy is an attractive choice for dermatology due to its advantageous such as targeting the site of disease and reduction of risk of systemic side effects. The drugs should penetrate into the skin, either reach dermis layer of skin. However, stratum corneum, the outermost layer of skin, is a unique barrier to passage of drugs. In order to overcome its barrier characteristics, optimization of nanocarriers has emerged as potential alternative for delivering drugs across stratum corneum to achieve either local effect for the treatment of diseases. Different types of nanocarriers including colloidal, vesicular, nanoparticulates are used for delivery of drugs to enhance cutaneous passage of drugs to target different layers of the skin. Among these systems, nanosized colloidal systems, microemulsions are one of the promising carries concerning dermal drug delivery. Nano-sized drug carriers depending of their size and physicochemical structures can be particularly a useful way of targeting skin layers.

  • Track 9: Recent Trends in Nanotechnology
Location: Fiji
Speaker

Chair

Gajanan Bhat

University of Tennessee, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Hiroaki Tada

Kinki University, Japan

Speaker
Biography:

Hiroaki Tada received his BS and MS in Engineering from Kyoto University. He worked at Nippon Sheet Glass Co. as a researcher from 1981 to 1996. He received his Doctoral degree in engineering from Kyoto University in 1991. He joined the staff of Environmental Research Laboratory at Kinki University in 1997, and the research group of Prof. A. T. Bell at University of California, Berkeley as an invited scholar in 2002. In 2004, he became a staff of School of Science and Engineering at Kinki University, where is currently a full professor. He has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals and serving as a high-profile editorial board member of repute Journal of Nanomaterials & Molecular Nanotechnology.

Abstract:

Serious global energy and environmental issues urge us to develop environmental catalysts for decomposing pollutants in ambient water and air by utilizing solar energy named as “solar environmental catalysts”. In this lecture, recent studies on the solar environmental catalysts consisting of TiO2 and molecular scale 3D metal oxide clusters on the surface (MOs/TiO2) have been summarized. The electronic state of MOs/TiO2 presents a fascinating scientific problem, while the photocatalytic and thermocatalytic activities are also interesting from a viewpoint of application as environmental catalysts. In the first part following the introduction, the chemisorption-calcination cycle technique for forming extremely small oxide clusters of 3d metals on TiO2, the physicochemical properties and electronic structures of MOs/TiO2 are described. The second part deals with their thermocatalytic and photocatalytic activities for the degradation of organic pollutants, and the essential action mechanisms of the metal oxide clusters. Combination of experiments and first principles density functional simulations shows that some MOs/TiO2 can be an ideal solar environmental catalyst working under sunlight and in the dark.

Gajanan Bhat

University of Tennessee, USA

Title: Meltblowing - a commercially feasible production technology for nanofibers

Time : 09:45-10:05

Speaker
Biography:

Gajanan Bhat completed his Ph.D. in 1990 from Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA. He has been a faculty member at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville for the past 22 years, and currently is the director of nonwoven materials research laboratory (UTNRL), a world-renowned center for polymer-based nonwovens research. He has published more than 200 research papers and has three US patents. He has been the president of the Fiber Society, and is an active member of INDA, TAPPI and the Textile Institute.

Abstract:

Melt blowing has been known to produce nonwoven webs with fiber diameters in the range of a few microns. With recent advances in technology, it has been possible to produce nonwoven webs with diameters in the range of few nanometers. There has been continuing interest in nanofibers for filtration and related applications. Several techniques have been researched over the years. Although many have been successful in the laboratory scale, for several reasons, they have not seen commercial success. The meltblown approach allows the production of nanofiber webs from thermoplastic polymers with relatively higher production rate, and is the most promising one for large-scale production. Special dies made from two different designs have been retrofitted in the traditional melt blowing line at the university of Tennessee nonwovens research laboratory (UTNRL) pilot lines to produce nanofiber webs from thermoplastic polymers. It has been demonstrated that melt blown webs with average diameters less than half a micron have been consistently produced from several polymers including polypropylene, polyesters and polylactic acid. Results from this ongoing research work will be discussed.

Benoit Coasne

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Title: Adsorption, intrusion and freezing in porous silica: The view from the nanoscale

Time : 10:05-10:25

Speaker
Biography:

Benoit Coasne obtained his Ph.D. in Physics on capillary condensation in nanoporous materials (Paris, 2003). Then, he worked as a postdoc with Keith Gubbins on freezing of nanoconfined systems (North Carolina, USA). In 2005, he was appointed French CNRS researcher in Montpellier, France. He is currently working in the CNRS/MIT joint department on MultiScale Material Science for Energy and Environment located on MIT campus. He is member of the bureau of the French Zeolite Society and Cofounder and President of the French Adsorption Society. His research focuses on the adsorption and dynamics of systems confined in porous materials.

Abstract:

The talk will present the state of the art of molecular simulation and theory of adsorption, intrusion and freezing in porous silica. Both silica pores of a simple geometry and disordered porous silicas which exhibit morphological and topological disorders are considered. A brief description of the numerical models of porous silicas available in the literature and present the most common molecular simulation and theoretical methods will be discussed. Adsorption in regular and irregular pores will be discussed in the light of classical theories of adsorption and capillary condensation in pores. The discussion will also present the different evaporation mechanisms for disordered systems: pore blocking and cavitation. The criticality of fluids confined in pores, which is still the matter of debate, will then be discussed. Theoretical results for intrusion/extrusion and freezing in silica pores will be reviewed and the validity of classical approaches such as the Washburn-Laplace equation and Gibbs-Thomson equation to describe the thermodynamics of intrusion and in-pore freezing will be discussed. The validity of the most widely used characterization techniques will also be discussed. Finally, some concluding remarks and directions for future work will be reported.

HanaTarabkova

J Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Czech Republic

Title: Nanobubble assisted changes of surface nanomorphology

Time : 10:25-10:45

Speaker
Biography:

Hana Tarabkova received her Ph.D. degree from Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague in 2003. Since then she has worked as a staff scientist in Department of Electrochemical Materials at the J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic. Her research interests are focused on characterization of nanostructured materials by scanning probe microscopy, both ex situ and in situ as well as in combination with electrochemical methods.

Abstract:

Nanobubbles and micropancakes are formed at the interface of aqueous solution and the hydrophobic surface. Compact and smooth polystyrene (PS) film spin coated on Si/SiO2 wafer was used as a hydrophobic supporting surface with sub-nanometer roughness. In our presentation we show nanobubble-assisted nanopatterning of polystyrene surface exposed to aqueous media under conditions when nanobubbles are formed. The fact, that the position of polystyrene nanoprotrusions corresponds with position of nanobubbles, allows us to study nanobubble existence by ex situ AFM. Relatively short time interval of nanobubbleassisted imprint formation allows us to investigate the dynamics and mechanism of nanobubble creation. We demonstrate in this work that ex post, ex situ AFM imaging of PS surface after its exposition to nanobubbles in deionized water represents suitable technique for examination of nano- and microbubble formation, distribution and arrangement without influence of AFM scanning tip and avoiding the in situ AFM imaging complications respectively.

Break: Coffee Break 10:45-11:00@ Bora Foyer

Lun Dai

Peking University, China

Title: Graphene / semiconductor nanowire hybrid optoelectronic devices

Time : 11:00-11:20

Speaker
Biography:

Lun Dai has completed her Ph.D. at the age of 33 years in Physics from Peking University at Beijing, China in 1999. She is now Professor in School Physics, Peking University. Her research career has focused primarily on nano-semiconductor material, nano-electronic and nano-photonic device physics. She has published more 80 SCI papers in reputed journals, including Nature, Nano Lett., Adv. Mater. JACS, ACS nano, J. Mater. Chem., Appl. Phys. Lett. etc. Total citation times for these papers are more than 1000.

Abstract:

High-performance graphene / CdS semiconductor nanowire (SNW) Schottky junction solar cells were fabricated. Au (5 nm)/graphene combined layers were used as the Schottky contact electrodes to the NW. A promising site-controllable patterned graphene transfer method, which economizes graphene material and requires no additional etching process, was demonstrated in this work. Typical as-fabricated solar cells showed excellent photovoltaic behavior with an energy conversion efficiency up to ~1.65%. We also developed a simple and scalable graphene patterning method using electron-beam or ultraviolet lithography followed by a lift-off process. This method, with the merits of: high pattern resolution and high alignment accuracy, without additional harsh process, universal to arbitrary substrates, compatible to Si microelectronic technology, can be easily applied to array-based device applications. We also fabricated the novel graphene nanoribbon (GNR)/SNW heterojunction lightemitting diodes (LEDs). Herein, ZnO, CdS, and CdSe NWs were employed as representatives. At forward biases, the GNR/ SNW heterojunction LED’s could emit light with wavelengths varying from ultraviolet (380 nm) to green (513 nm) to red (705 nm), which were determined by the band-gaps of the involved SNWs. The mechanism of light emitting for the GNR/SNW heterojunction LEDs was discussed. Our work pioneers new routes to developing diverse graphene-based nano-optoelectronic devices, which are basic components in integrated optoelectronic system.

Hakan Pettersson

Halmstad University, Sweden

Title: Optoelectronics with nanowires and quantum dots

Time : 11:20-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Hakan Pettersson received his Ph.D. in Solid State Physics from Lund University, Sweden, in 1993. Between 1997 and 1999 he did a postdoc at the Ludwig-Maximilans-University in Munich, Germany. Prof. Pettersson´s research field was initially spectroscopy on deep impurities in semiconductors, in particular silicon. Subsequently, he changed his research focus to nanoscience, and in particular to studies on electrical and optical properties of nanoscale optoelectronics. More recently, he has broadened his research focus to include also nanospintronics. He currently holds a position as Prof. of physics and Head of the Dept. of Mathematics, Physics & Electrical Engineering at Halmstad University, Sweden.

Abstract:

In this talk, electrical and optical properties of infrared photodetectors based on self-assembled III-V semiconductor nanowires and quantum dots with possible applications in optical communication and thermal imaging will be discussed. The photodetectors operating at near-infrared wavelengths are fabricated from self-assembled ensembles of vertical p-i-n InP nanowires grown on p-InP substrates. The nanowire junctions display excellent rectifying behavior with small leakage currents. The detailed spectral signatures of the photocurrent depend on the length of the n- and p-segments in the NWs, temperature and polarization of incident radiation. Without p-segment, the main photocurrent contribution comes from an efficient funneling of photogenerated carriers from the substrate into the nanowires. Increasing the p-segment length instead leads to a dominant generation of photocurrent in the nanowires, in agreement with sophisticated modeling. Since III-V nanowires can be monolithically grown on Si, we believe that a subsequent integration of our nanowire detectors on silicon offers a viable route to on-chip optoelectronics in line with the ”More than Moore” concept. Electrical and optical characteristics of long-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on intersubband transitions in self-assembled InAs quantum dots embedded in multiple In0.15Ga0.85As/GaAs quantum wells will also be discussed. The detailed electronic structure of the dots and well was determined from combining photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopy and tunnel capacitance spectroscopy. Inter sub band photocurrent spectroscopy revealed a dominant transition at 8.5 mm between the ground state of the quantum dots and the excited state of the quantum well. The spectral window of the detectors can be effectively tuned with the applied bias. Results from 3D calculations of the electronic structure, including effects of composition intermixing and inter-dot interactions, confirm the experimentally unraveled energy level scheme of the dots and well.

Speaker
Biography:

Ho-Kei Chan has developed a method of sequential deposition for constructing the densest possible cylindrical packings of equal-sized spheres. Such structures are found in a variety of quasi-1D systems, such as fullerenes inside nanotubes and colloidal crystal wires. He obtained a 1st class degree in Engineering Physics (2002) from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and a Ph.D. in Nonlinear and Liquid Crystal Physics (2007) from the University of Manchester, followed by post-doctoral research in Hong Kong, Ireland and England. He has published in the fields of packing problems, soft matter physics and conduction problems.

Abstract:

Dense packings of equal-sized hard spheres in cylindrical confinement serve as a model for a variety of quasi-1D systems with spherical entities, such as fullerenes inside nanotubes and colloidal crystal wires. For such hard-sphere systems, our research included (i) the computational prediction of a rich variety of densest possible structures (most of which are helical) as a function of the cylinder-to-sphere diameter ratio, and (ii) the development of a method of sequential deposition for constructing all these densest possible structures. In this talk, (i) an overview of such densest possible structures, (ii) explain how they can be constructed via a sequential deposition of spheres, and (iii) present some novel helical structures as discovered (unexpectedly) from the same deposition method will be given.

Seiichi Furumi

National Institute for Materials Science, Japan

Title: Self-organized organic photonic crystals for laser applications

Time : 12:00-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Seiichi Furumi received Ph.D. from the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 2001. During his Ph.D. studies, he was also a Research Fellow for Young Scientists of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. After his Ph.D. studies, he worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher of the Communications Research Laboratory. In 2004, he held a permanent position of the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS). From 2010, he concurrently started a research project as a PRESTO Researcher of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). Since 2012, he also served as an Associated Professor of the University of Tsukuba.

Abstract:

This presentation shows the recent development of self-assembled photonic crystals (PCs) of organic and polymer materials, such as chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) and colloidal crystals (CCs), for laser applications. Both CLCs and CCs have intrinsic capabilities to spontaneously assemble 1D-PC and 3D-PC structures, respectively. When a periodic length in the PC structures of CLCs and CCs corresponds to several hundred nanometers in the light wavelength, the photonic band-gaps (PBGs) can be visualized as Bragg reflection colors. When fluorescence dyes are embedded in the CLCs and CCs, the stimulated laser action at PBG band edge(s) or within the PBG wavelength can be generated by optical excitation. Moreover, the optically-excited laser action is controllable by external stimuli due to the self-organization of CLCs and CCs. This presentation highlights not only the research backgrounds of CLC and CC structures as PCs, but also the experimental results of their soft and tunable laser applications. We believe that a wide variety of CLC and CC structures will play leading roles in the next-generation of optoelectronic devices of organic and polymer materials.

Zhenhai Zhang

Beijing Institute of Technology, China

Title: Development of a micro-biorobot for drug delivery: Bacterial propulsion of liposomes

Time : 12:20-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Zhenhai Zhang is an Associate Professor in the School of Mechatronics Engineering at the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT), China. From 2010 to 2011, he is a postdoctoral researcher in Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Japan. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in the School of Mechatronics Engineering from BIT in 2004 and 2008, and his B.S. degree from Harbin University of Science & Technology (HUST), Harbin, China in 1997, respectively. His main research interests include Bio-micro Manipulation System and Bio-MEMS, MEMS/NEMS sensors and test technology. He is Council Member of Sensor Branch of China Instrument and Control Society, Committee Member of Optoelectronic Technology Professional Committee, Chinese Society of Astronautics, Editorial Board Member of Computer Measurement & Control, Project Evaluation Expert of National Natural Science Fund Committee, and a peer reviewer for the World Famous International Journal of Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Applied Physics, Smart Materials and Structures. He has authored/co-authored over 22 journal publications or conference papers in these fields. He applies to the patent authority for 30 invention patent.`

Abstract:

The primary goals of biomedical micro-robots are to reach currently inaccessible areas of the human body and carry out a host of complex operations. Potential targeted medical applications for these micro-robots include highly localized minimally invasive surgery, drug delivery, and screening for diseases at their early stages. However, two of the most significant obstacles are the miniaturization of the on-board actuators and power sources required for mobility and realization of high-mobility delivery vehicles. Bio-motors are deemed to be one of the most promising choices for on-board actuation. They have many advantages over man-made actuators mainly because they are much smaller and are capable of producing more complicated motions. More importantly, they convert chemical energy to mechanical energy very efficiently. Liposome as drug delivery vehicle can contain biologically active compounds. If required chemicals can be injected into the liposome and efficiently transported to a local area in human body, there will be a potential of applying them to drug delivery system. Biological micro-robot is a good choice for transporting the liposome. To address these problems for micro-robots and drug delivery vehicle, we propose miniature, and energy-efficient bio-mimetic propulsion concepts of interfacing bacteria with liposome by means of antibody, with the ultimate goal of using bacteria with liposome for actuation, control, sensing, and moving towards target. The research work presented here intends to investigate the stochastic nature of bacterial propulsion of liposome, which is important for developing nextgeneration bio-hybrid swimming micro-robots finding applications in diverse fields ranging from biomedical to environmental applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Jorge Ignacio Martinez-Araya is currently working as an Assistant Professor in Universidad Andrés Bello. He is editorial board member of University Magzine Pedro de Valdivia University. His research interests include Quantum Chemistry, Mathematical Chemistry, Material Science.

Abstract:

The growing importance of nanoscience and nanotechnology implies not only the development of new experimental techniques for characterization of nano-structures, but also the development of new processes of synthesis in order to make easier the production of novel compounds that are expected to be generated at industrial scales. However, getting a more rational insight about reaction mechanisms that permit the synthesis of these final products is still an issue of interest in basic science and hence new theoretical and experimental procedures are needed to provide this type of information. Quantum chemistry is not an exception because it has demonstrated to be very useful to shed lights about the description of several types of molecular structures. In particular, a key aspect is the reactivity because it allows identify those sites on a molecule that present a major trend to form or destroy a chemical bond, thus turning the original molecule into another one with expected or unexpected properties and applications. Different theories based on quantum chemistry are able to provide conceptual tools to understand chemical transformations. One of these theories is called conceptual density functional theory which provides global, local and non-local reactivity descriptors. In particular, the conceptual DFT has given rise to the so called dual descriptor which is able to reveal sites susceptible to receive nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, and although this descriptor is still under improvement this descriptor has demonstrated to be a robust tool to understand reaction mechanisms; it is expected that the conceptual DFT can be used in assisting synthesis of novel compounds and for understanding reactivity of different structures like fullerenes. This talk will be focused on this local reactivity descriptor and its possibilities to be used as a guide for synthesis of new compounds within the field of nanoscience.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-13:40@ Coral AB
  • Track 10: Applications of Nanotechnology
Location: Fiji
Speaker

Chair

Jaime Rocha-Gomes

University of Minho, Portugal

Speaker

Co-Chair

Robert K. DeLong

Missouri State University, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Jaime Rocha Gomes is a Professor in Textile Chemistry at the University of Minho, Portugal, and since the year 1998 have dedicated my work mainly to microcapsules to be applied to textiles. The main activity consisted in developing processes for microcpasule synthesis and to functionalizing them so as to bind them to the fibers. This laboratory work was followed by a scale up materialized in a spin-off company that has been founded together with the researchers and suported by a venture capital. Later in 2007 the company sold to a belgian company, Devan Chemicals, that also bought the patents. He believes that they the second company in the world in ranking in the PCM market, microcapsules of phase change materials, developed by us. Since then he moved on to nanoparticles, based on the sol-gel process, and incorporated products such as antimicrobial, antimosquito and dyes. These developments made us register a spin-off Ecoticke that will commercialize the antimicrobial and the antimosquito as soon as it has capital investment to do so, and the colored nanoparticles won a national prize and investment to start a company , Ecofoot, that will produce colored nanoparticles very shortly.

Abstract:

The microencapsulation of substances for application to textiles started with fragrances in the 80s, and evolved to more sophisticated applications such as insect repellent, firstly based on fragrances that repel mosquitos, such as eucalyptus and citronella, and then incorporating substances such as DEET and permethrin. However, when applied to textiles, the microcapsules release their content prematurely during washing, making them very sensitive to washing conditions and generally not resistant to more than a few machine wash cycles. With silica nanoparticles, the durability is higher since the product is contained within it their pores and bound by H bonds in case of hydrophilic products such as hydrogen peroxide, and the nanoparticles do not break as in the case of microcapsules, as proven in previous work. Since they have antimicrobial properties, these products are useful for application on textiles such as hospital wear. To fix the nanoparticles to textiles a binder was used. The durability of washing was more than 25 washes. Like these other useful hydrophilic products can be incorporated into silica nanoparticles, with specific properties of interest to textiles such as products that may have insect repellent properties.In this work,one such product fitted the profile and was incorporated into the silica nanoparticles and applied to textiles. They were then tested for mosquito repellency and showed activity even after 10 washes. There was still active product present after 50 washes as determined by colorimetric tests. Results of repellency and durability to washing are presented.

A. Vaseashta

Institute for Advanced Sciences Convergence and International clean Water Institute NUARI, USA

Title: New THz technologies and applications in support of safety and security

Time : 14:00-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

Vaseashta received a Ph.D. from the Virginia Tech, VA in 1990. Currently, he serves as Director of Research at the CISTecK/ICWI with NUARI. Concurrently, he serves as visiting Professor in Romania and Chaired Professor at the Academy of Sciences of Moldova. He also served as a visiting scientist at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. Since 2007, he had several fellowships at the U.S Department of State serving in the offices of WMDT and Foreign Consequence Management and as S&T advisor in the office of Verification and Transparency Technologies. He is fellow of the American Physical Society, Institute of Nanotechnology, and New York Academy of Sciences. He was awarded Gold medal by the University of Armenia for his contribution to Nanotechnology. He has earned several other fellowships/awards for his meritorious services. His research interests include counter-terrorism; chemical-bio sensors; water safety and security; environmental pollution monitoring and remediation; and green nanotechnology. He authored over 230 research publications and edited/authored six books. He is an active member of several national and international professional organizations.

Abstract:

Recent incidents have affected changes to the methods employed for security screening at airports and border security checkpoints. At cargo screening facilities and major border check-points, where thousands of containers need to be screened rapidly, it is a challenging task to effectively screen each container. As a result, there is an increasing focus on new technologies that can be applied for security screening in a stand-off mode, either to simplify or speed up the screening process, or to provide additional functionality. Terahertz (THz) technology is a promising and emerging technology and has been in use in various forms for safety and security applications. Additionally in battlefield, one of the major threat vectors is improvised explosive devices (IEDs) used in different forms such as vehicle borne IEDs (VBIEDs) or strapped to humans at inconspicuous locations. THz pulsed imaging systems can be used to image such threat vectors, since such materials have characteristic THz spectra. The use THz illumination of sufficient power levels and fast image detection and processing, has shown that non-metallic weaponry can be imaged when concealed beneath clothing. Some of the barrier and potential confusing materials have smooth spectra with relatively low attenuation. However, use of the THz frequencies, initially aimed at narrow-band at 830 GHz along with optical mixing can be used to identify metal and dielectric objects. The ultimate possibility to identify the chemical compositions of explosive materials and mixed chemical compositions needs the wide-band antennas. The lecture will introduce some of the applications of THz for stand-off detection, use of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to generate THz frequencies, and demonstrate that the THz spectra of several common chemicals and medicines are distinct for ease of identification.

R.K. Singh Raman

Monash University, Australia

Title: Nanocrystalline alloys for remarkable oxidation resistance

Time : 14:20-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

R. K. Singh Raman has a joint appointment as a full professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Monash University (Melbourne, Australia). He is also a Research Professor at Centre for Clean Energy Engineering at University of Connecticut (USA). His primary research interests are in the relationship of Nano-/microstructure and Environmentassisted degradation and fracture, and Nanotechnology for Advanced Mitigation of such Degradations. He has also worked extensively on use of advanced materials (e.g., graphene) for corrosion mitigation, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion and corrosion-mitigation of magnesium alloys (including for the use of magnesium alloys for aerospace, defence and bioimplant applications). His professional distinctions and recognitions include: editor of a book on cracking of welds, member the Editorial/ Review Boards of a few journals (including the prestigious, Metallurgical & Materials Transactions of ASM, USA), leader/co-chairman of a few international conferences and regular keynote/invited lectures at international conferences, over 135 peer-reviewed international journal publications, 15 book chapters/books and over 100 reviewed conference publications, and several competitive research grants totaling over $8M (that includes 3 Discovery, and 8 Linkage grants of Australian Research Council). Professor Singh had research training/employment at Indian Institute of Technology (Kharagpur), Indian Atomic Energy and University of New South Wales (Sydney). He has supervised over thirty Ph.D. students. His vibrant research group at Monash University comprises of Ph.D. students from different disciplines (Mechanical, Chemical, Materials and Mining Engineering, and Science) as well as from different cultural backgrounds (Australian, Middle-eastern, Chinese, Malaysian, Indian, African, North American and Israeli).

Abstract:

This presentation will demonstrate remarkable resistance to oxidation as result of the nanocrystalline alloy structure. This will include an elaborate description of the author’s own hypothesis that nanocrystalline structure can impart extraordinary oxidation resistance, and the validation of this hypothesis. A thorough surface/subsurface characterization of oxidized alloys, using secondary ion mass spectrometry has provided a sound mechanistic understanding of the remarkable improvement in oxidation as result of nanocrystalline structure. The data to be presented will include the results establishing that a Fe-Cr nanocrystalline alloy with only 10 wt% Cr can provide as much oxidation resistance as a Fe-20Cr alloy, suggesting possibility of Fe-Cr alloys with the necessary corrosion resistance at much lower Cr contents. As another exciting potential application of this work, the nanocrystalline powders of Fe-Cr alloys synthesized in this study could be used for developing corrosion resistance coating having considerably low Cr contents.

Speaker
Biography:

Robert K. De Long grew up in upstate New York and received his Bachelors and Masters degrees from the University of Buffalo and the University of Rochester respectively. He studied with Professor Paul Miller, the forefather of antisense oligonucleotides for the Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics, at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions in the School of Public Health. He then performed post-doctoral research with Professor Rudy Juliano at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC), best known for his work in cell signaling, gene and siRNA delivery. At UNC, he began pre-clinical work with anti-cancer nucleic acids and continued these studies in industry, at Valentis (formerly GeneMedicine) in the California bay area, prior to joining PowderJect Vaccines (PJV). PJV was started out of Oxford University in the UK, but eventually had offices in the bay area and in Madison, WI where he worked until 2002-2003 when PJV was bought by Glaxo-SmithKline. After that, he and his family relocated back to Chapel Hill where he became a visiting scholar and began teaching. In 2007 he joined the faculty at Missouri State University, where he now teaches Biomolecular Interactions and Biotechnology courses and is an active mentor of undergraduate and graduate research. His group has two main programs of research currently; 1) an NIH/NCI funded project, “Anti-Cancer RNA Nanoconjugates” and 2) an NSF/BBBE project, “Enzyme Bionanoconjugates: activation, stabilization and inhibition of enzymes by metal oxide nanomaterials”. In his spare time, he is an avid sportsman and enjoys hiking, biking and traveling with his family.

Abstract:

Our group has been studying the binding, stabilization and delivery of designed therapeutic RNA molecules together with engineered nanomaterials and composites. Given the huge effort in the synthesis of nanomaterials from virtually every element in the periodic chart, the effect that these have on protein and nucleic acid structure-function is perhaps one of the most important questions in modern molecular cell biology. Initially we focused on nanomaterial derived of bio-elements such as zinc and manganese most well-known to mediate protein:nucleic acid interaction in cells and tissues, and have since expanded to composite nanomaterials derived of these and other important bio-elements. It was first necessary to develop synthetic methods in order to control the size and morphology of these nanomaterials which we did and have now found that both this and the nanomaterials’ chemical composition greatly impacts their interaction with biomolecules. To study biomolecular nanoconjugate formation, we have employed a variety of characterization techniques including; light scatter, UV, fluorescence and CD spectroscopy, nanosight, electron and atomic force microscopy. Functional effect of the nanomaterials on the biochemical activity of 3 model enzymes (luciferase, beta-galactosidease, reverse transcriptase) has been studied revealing exquisite and specific activation, stabilization, and inhibition. Nanoconjugate bio-activity was examined in several human cell lines for the delivery of siRNA, poly I:C, splice switching oligomer (SSO) and chimeric RNA-DNA aptamer in combination with various nanomaterial and composites revealing potent and specific effects on gene expression and cancer-killing. Finally we are beginning to progress several promising composite nanoconjugates into pre-clinical animal models.

Speaker
Biography:

Osamu Nakatsuka has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 27 years from Nagoya University and postdoctoral studies from Kyoto University. He is the Associate Professor of the Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University. His research area is related to group-IV semiconductor technology, thin film engineering, and surface/interface science. He has published more than 70 papers in international journals and serving as an editorial board member of Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

Abstract:

Application of Si nanoelectronics is widely growing from ultra-large scale integrated circuits to various functional, microelectromechanical, and optoelectronic systems. Ge1-xSnx is one of the most attractive materials in order to develop future Si nanoelectronics. Ge1-xSnx is expected to be stressor for realizing biaxially tensile or uniaxially compressive strained Ge for higher mobility channel than conventional strained Si. Also, Ge1-xSnx with a high Sny content larger than 10% promises to be direct transition semiconductor with lowering the conduction band edge at the Γpoint. That leads to realizing optoelectronic applications and high mobility channel with a small effective mass of electron at the Γpoint. In addition, Ge1-x-ySixSny ternary alloy is expected to be electronic and optoelectronic materials because of its advantage that the energy band structure can be controlled independently on the lattice constant. Challenges of Sn-related group-IV materials are suppressing the Sn precipitation from the substitutional site, controlling crystalline defects and strains, and engineering the energy band structure and electronic properties. We have developed the epitaxial growth and/or crystallization of Ge1-xSnx and Ge1-x-ySixSny thin films on various substrates such as Si, Ge, InP, and insulators. We have also investigated the behavior of Sn, dopant atoms, and point defects in the Sn-related semiconductors. In this presentation, we demonstrate recent results of growth and properties of Sn-related group-IV materials for future Si nanoelectronics applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Shin-ichi Naya received his BS in 1996, M.D. in 1998 and Ph.D. in 2001 in Chemistry from Waseda University. He joined the research group of Prof. M. Nitta at Waseda University as a Research Associate in 2000 and subsequently served as a postdoctoral fellow of 21COE “Practical Nanochemistry” at Waseda University in 2003. In 2006, he served as a postdoctoral fellow of 21COE “New Functional Materials for Highly Efficient Energy Systems” at Aoyama Gakuin University. In 2007, he joined the staff of Environmental Research Laboratory at Kinki University.

Abstract:

Phenol derivatives are used for the synthesis of many industrial chemical products, e.g., p-cresol for an antiseptic substance, bisphenol A for polycarbonate, and 2-naphthol for azo dyes. Among them, nonylphenol and bisphenol A are well known endocrine disruptor, and the concentration in environmental water should be restricted below 0.1 μM. Thus, a sunlight-driven process for completely removing phenol derivatives, particularly nonylphenol and bisphenol A, from the wastewater is of great importance for environmental conservation. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles (NPs) show the strong visible light absorption due to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The LSPR-driven photocatalyst called as “plasmon photocatalyst” has recently attracted much attention as a new type of visible-light photocatalyst. In this talk, we show that visiblelight irradiation of gold nanoparticle (NP)-loaded rutile TiO2 (Au/rutile TiO2) plasmon photocatalyst leads to rapid and complete removal and degradation of nonylphenol from its dilute aqueous solution. Au/rutile TiO2 exhibits much higher activity than Au/anatase TiO2 and BiVO4. Based on the results of the action spectrum analysis, the adsorption and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopic measurements, we show a unique reaction scheme consisting of a series of events, 1) the large adsorption and concentration of nonylphenol on the Au NP surface, 2) the successive efficient oxidation induced by the LSPR-driven interfacial electron transfer from Au NP to rutile TiO2, and 3) the regeneration of the adsorption sites by the surface transport of the intermediates from Auto TiO2.

Break: Coffee Break 15:40-15:55@ Bora Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. A. Kumaraswamy is a Professor, HoD of Mechanical Engineering department from Defense Institute of Advanced Technology, India. He is a Life Member of Indian Society for Technical Education and Indian Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. His research interest relays on Solid Mechanics/Contact Mechanics, Stress Analysis, Tribology Static(Macro/Micro/Nano) indentation, Nano Scratching, Dynamic indentation-High strain-rate flow behavior of materials for Defence applications, Finite Element Analysis, Metal Forming/Metal cutting.

Abstract:

Instrumented indentation has become an important non-destructive procedure that can be used to evaluate the mechanical properties of a wide range of engineering materials across the nano, micro and macro length scales. The characteristic properties of biological materials and structures, organic polymers, metals, ceramics and electronic materials can also be evaluated via indentation. The simplicity of the indentation process offers a number of advantages when compared to other experimental approaches for assessing the micro-nano mechanical properties of materials and structures that possess limited volumes. Elastic modulus and hardness are the two properties that are more frequently measured by the load and depth sensing indentation technique. Furthermore, the plastic properties of a material, such as yield stress and work hardening exponent have also been extracted from instrumented indentation. In the present investigation, nanoindentation was carried out to extract the elastic and plastic properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at two heat treatment conditions using Dao’s inverse algorithm and the results were compared with the tensile test data. It was observed that, the elastic modulus from nanoindentation for all the test specimens was about 10% higher than the values obtained in tensile testing, which can be attributed to different size and micro structural levels that are probed. FE analysis using ABAQUS was carried out to simulate the indentation behaviour from elastic-plastic properties obtained from the inverse method. The predicted values from FEA had a good agreement with the experimental results. Pile- up and sink-in behaviour of the alloy was also studied.

Ramesh T Subramaniam

University of Malaya, Malaysia

Title: Nanomaterial functionality in polymer electrolyte membranes

Time : 16:15-16:35

Speaker
Biography:

Ramesh T. Subramaniam completed his Ph.D. from University of Malaya, Malaysia in the field of Advanced Materials. His accomplishment in the area of green polymer electrolytes has earned him the recognition as a prominent researcher in this field. He has received many awards and recognition namely TWAS Young Affiliate Fellow for the period 2009-2013, Pacifichem Young Scholar Award 2010, Young Scientist Award 2011 from IUPAC, IAP Young Scientist 2012 and GYA Young Scientist 2013. To date, he has published and presented more than 130 papers. His total number of citations is more than 700 with an h-index of 15.

Abstract:

Nanomaterials such as fumed silica, zirconium dioxide, carbon nanotube, silver oxide etc. are the emerging materials that have significant effect in tailoring the lacking properties in polymer electrolyte membranes. This material is an attractive candidate owing to its small particle size which has high penetration ability into the matrix with less restriction towards its free flow mobility. The embedment of nanomaterials into the polymer matrix is found to improve the conducting nature along with its mechanical strength. The conducting nature is improved with the presence of polar functional group in the nanomaterial that acts as a transit site for the hopping of charge carriers. As for the mechanical strength, the small sized nanomaterial improves this property by filling up the spaces of the pores and forming a network with the atoms at the outer most surface of the pores, eventually closing the pores. The beneficial functionality of nanomaterial is being applied in the matrix formed from an acrylate based copolymer and this formulation is found to possess added advantages such as behaving as an adhesive and being mechanically elastic. The formulation of a thin film membrane with the combination of adhesion and elastic property creates a platform for utilization in the electrochemical device applications. This dry-natured thin film polymer electrolyte is found to be a good replacement for the commercially available liquid type and subsequently improves the safety of the applications with the most concern focusing on portable type applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Evgeniya Peshkova is presently an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of Genova Medical School. After taking her Doctoral degree in Chemistry at Moscow State Lomonosov University in 1998, and the Ph.D. in Biophysics at University of Genova in 2003, she was Scientific Director of Fondazione EL.B.A. (Electronic Biotechnology Advanced) and Principle Investigator of a big FIRB research grant on Organic Nanotechnology. Later she acquired the scientific responsibility of the laboratory of Nanobiocrystallography at the Nanoworld Institute, University of Genova. In 2007, she worked as a Visiting Scientist at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble in Macromolecular Crystallography and Soft Condensed Matter, remaining up to now one of the PI of Radiation Damage BAG. She is author of more than 50 international scientific publications (ISI-SCI), 2 patents, several chapters to books and textbooks. She is the author of "Proteomics and Nanocrystallography" and editor of “Synchrotron Radiation and Nanobiosciences” (with Claudio Nicolini), “Structural Proteomics and Synchrotron Radiation” (with Christian Riekel) within the Pan Stanford Series on Nanobiotechnology. Her main scientific interests are structural proteomics, functional nanoproteomics and nanocrystallography.

Abstract:

We studied laser-microdissection of “standard” and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) nanotemplate protein crystals in glycerol solution. The time required for microdissection was significantly longer for LB-crystals as compared to standard-crystals which also more rapidly dissolve. Microfragmentation of lysozyme crystals was observed after extended solvent exposure. Synchrotron radiation nanobeam mapping allowed localizing and aligning cryofrozen lysozyme microfragments. 3D datasets obtained from two microfragments were refined to atomic resolution. The well-defined electron density maps showed no evidence for damage of radiation of sensitive side-groups. Our results suggest applications of laser-microdissection techniques in structural studies on crystals with a high mosaicity. They also provide a new window for the characterization of protein crystal organization down to the submicron scale, pointing to a new emerging biophysical technique.

Shu-Ping Lin

National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan

Title: Observation of cell growth on the surface-modified TiO2 nanostructures

Time : 16:55-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Shu-Ping Lin obtained her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from National Cheng Kung University in 2008. She was a visiting Research Associate in Dr. Themis Kyriakides’s laboratory at Yale University from 2006 to 2007. She worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica (2008-2009), and Research Associate at Industrial Technology Research Institute (2009-2010). In 2010, she joined Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, as an Assistant Professor. She has published papers in reputed journals, such as NanoToday, Biomaterials, Biomacromolecules, Biomedical Microdevices, and Sensors. Her research interests are mainly directed toward designing and developing biocompatible nano/micro biosensors, cell/tissue engineering, electrophysiological measurements, biocompatible and functionable surface modification.

Abstract:

In order to gain insights into how cells respond the external nanoscale environment, we used unmodified and modified surfaces of anodized TiO2 nanostructures (ATNs) to investigate the effect of those modified groups on cell morphological change and cell growth. X-ray diffraction showed the nanotubes consisted of TiO2. Those ATN were around 60.374 nm in diameter in the analyses of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ATNs were then modified by two varied small chemicals of 3-aminoproplytrime thexysilane (APTMS) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) was used to characterize the chemical components of original Ti web, unmodified, APTMS and MPTMS modified ATNs. ESCA showed the successful surface modifications with the specific amine (-NH2 was at 399.8 eV) and mercaptal (-SH was at 162.5 eV) functional groups on the surface of APTMS and MPTMS modified ATN, respectively. In order to investigate the effect of ATN on cell growth, 3T3 fibroblasts were independently cultured on the original Ti web, unmodified and modified ATNs. SEM and fluorescent images displayed the cells thrived on unmodified and modified ATNs. In addition, quantitative analyses of cell numbers exhibited APTMS modified ATN effectively facilitated the cell proliferation with an increasingly cellular growth. We found APTMS modified ATN improved the overall capability of cell growth up to 35.6 % in our in-vitro observation owing to better and fully cell-membrane contact to positive charge of protonated amino groups (-NH3+). Our study showed that cells can respond sub-nano chemical environments and further altered their growth on the substrates.

Karl Mandel

Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Germany

Title: Superparamagnetic particles and their application in water purification and resources recovery

Time : 17:15-17:35

Speaker
Biography:

Karl Mandel studied earth science, (nano) materials science and chemistry in Munich, Ulm and Wuerzburg (Germany) as well as at the University of Oxford (UK). He is now working as a scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC in Wuerzburg, Germany, and is dealing with the synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles and nanocomposite microparticles.

Abstract:

Tailored magnetic particles might be promising agents for purification and recovery applications. Such particles may act as scavengers when added to a fluid (such as water) that contains dissolved substances which shall be removed or recovered. After having adsorbed to the targets, the particles can be extracted magnetically from the fluid together with their load. Chemical regeneration allows recovery of substances and a reuse of the particles. Although magnetic separation has been known for a long time, nanotechnology introduced a new aspect to the technique: if particles are nano sized, they may behave superparamagnetically, i.e., these particles may serve as switchable magnets. They can be extracted in the gradient of a magnetic field, but without an external magnetic field, they can be easily dispersed in a fluid without any remanent magnetic agglomeration. Although it is very often published that “nanoparticles” are used for separation of target substances, there are doubts if it is really possible to easily magnetically extract individual nanoparticles as the counteracting Brownian forces are strong for such small particles. It is therefore a better strategy to incorporate many superparamagnetic nanoparticles into a matrix to form larger, micron sized particles, i.e., to transfer the nano property superapamagnetism to the micron scale. Such micron sized switchable magnetic particles can be modified in all kind of ways for (selective) recovery of substances from fluids.

J. Ronda

AGH Universityof Science and Technology and the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS, Poland

Title: Medical applicability of bioactive polymer surfaces with DLC and noble metal-doped coatings

Time : 17:35-17:55

Speaker
Biography:

Jacek Ronda has completed his Ph.D. and obtained his D.Sc. from the Institute of Fundamental Technological Research PAS in Warsaw. He is appointed as the Professor both in the AGH Academy of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland and Cape Peninsula University of Technology in Belville, South Africa. He promoted 6 doctors and more than 30 M.Sc. graduates. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals and conference proceedings and has been serving as the referee in several journals and publishing boards.

Abstract:

Two techniques for the formation of protective layers on polymers by using ions are known from the literature and from patent descriptions: IBSD (ion beam sputtering deposition) and DB IBAD (dual-beam ion beam assisted deposition).They enable the preparation of biologically active coatings on medical implantsmade of polyethylene, UHMWPE (ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene) or other biocompatible plastics. The use of wear-resistant diamond like carbon coatings (DLC) to improve the tribological properties of head-cup hip joint replacement, which can greatly extend the working life of the endoprosthesis. Techniques using ions (IBSD, IBAD) enable the formation of composite coatings with excellent adherence to the substrate, and, given the appropriate layered structure, coatings formed using ion techniques can significantly reduce the mechanical stress of the coating/substrate. The aim of the presentation is to demonstrate the invention to obtain layers with special properties, ensuring physicochemical activity and bioactivity of the coating when in contact with pathogens.In this invention, the technique depends on the fact that a plate made of a heterogeneous mixture of carbon powder, iridium, and platinum, is placed in a high- vacuum chamber and is bombarded by an ion beam of noble gases while the sputtering rates for carbon, platinum, and iridium characterizing the sputtering process are calculated individually for each of the proposed coatings. The bioactive coating obtained via this technique, formed from a beam ofatoms and ions, is amorphousand is characterized by uniform distribution of carbon, iridium and platinum throughout the volume of the coating.This carbon-doped bioactive coating is hydrophobic because it is acted upon by electrical effects on a nanoscopic scale; therefore, bacterial-viral biofilms cannot moisten them and thus cause inflammation in the vicinity of the implant. On the implant coating appear nano-electrode matrices that are activated in the environment of the patient’s physiological fluid with a pH of 7.2 and enable the occurrence of local potential differences on the surface of the implant in any physiological fluid of the patient so as to allow a very weak flow of electric charge and thus a Maxwell-Lorentz force on a nanoscopic scale.

Break: 17:30-18:30 Poster Presentations @ Tahiti
18:30-20:00 Cocktails Sponsored by Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery @ Bora Foyer