Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Nanotek and Expo Hampton Inn Tropicana Las Vegas, USA .

Day 1 :

  • Track 1: Nanomaterials (Session 1)
Location: Salon A
Speaker

Chair

Animesh Jha

University of Leeds, UK

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ming-Hwa R. Jen

National Sun Yat-Sen University, Republic of China

Speaker
Biography:

Animesh Jha is a Materials Scientist, specializing in the area of inorganic photonic materials based on glass, glass-ceramics, and crystals. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Imperial College of Science and Technology in 1984. After 3 years of postdoctoral research at the University of Sheffield between 1986 and 1989, he joined Brunel University in UK as a lecturer in May 1989. In March 1996, he was appointed as a Reader at the University of Leeds in the School of Materials, where he became full-time Professor in August 2000. At the University of Leeds, his main interests are in the fundamentals of glass science, thin film structures, laser-matter interaction and engineering novel materials for device applications, and interaction of lasers with biological molecules. He has supervised over 20 postgraduate (Ph.D. and M. Phil) students, published over 230 papers on rare-earth doped glass, glass-ceramics, and devices. In 2005 and 2010, he was awarded the fellowship of the Society of Glass Technology and the Institute of Physics, respectively. He has memberships of OSA, IEEE, IoP and The Metals Society. He has won the Department of Trade & Industry’s SMART and SMART Development awards for Er-doped Glass Engineering for Broadband Amplifiers, Yorkshire Concept award for Laser Gain Materials Engineering, and the Research council’s Basic Technology award for Glass-on-Semiconductor Integration.

Abstract:

The last 25 years has seen an unprecedented increase in the growth of phonic components based on semiconductor lasers, glass and polymer based optical fibres, and organic LED, and solid state lasers. Each of these components suffers from its intrinsic materials related limitations which then limit the performance of integrated devices. A solution to the materials limitation is to develop device fabrication strategy which then allows multi-materials processing on a substrate, without compromising the structural, thermal, and spectroscopic performances. The challenge then one confronts is that the semiconductors are grown on an MBE machine, whereas the polymeric thin film materials are fabricated by traditional spin coating. By comparison, the glass and crystal based materials are processed via sputtering, or sol-gel techniques. None of these techniques, therefore, are compatible for a single step device fabrication, due to chemical and physical incompatibilities of different materials. A vast majority of rare-earth ion doped glass- and crystal- based devices are often pumped with semiconductor lasers, which then suggests that the glass-semiconductor devices might perform better when structurally integrated, and that engineering such structures might lead to reduction in pump power, leading to high photon-to-photon conversion. In this invited lecture, the importance of nano and femto-second pulsed lasers is demonstrated by showing the examples of multi-material deposition using different materials targets. The modelling tools are used a priori for waveguide engineering for ascertaining the extent to which the structural incompatibility due to mismatch strain can be minimized. The structure and spectroscopic properties of rare-earth ion doped thin films on silica, polymer, and semiconductor GaAs substrates were examined in detail and will be reported. We demonstrate the formation of glass-polymer superlattice structures, immiscible glass waveguide structures, nano-silicon deposited waveguides for semiconductor integration. The machining properties of such composite structures using femto-second Ti-sapphire lasers is also described, which clearly shows that such complex structures from start-to-finish can be fabricated using different types of pulsed lasers without the need of expensive clean room facilities. The amplified spontaneous emission and gain properties of such waveguides are characterized for a range of device applications and will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Ming-Hwa R. Jen has completed his Ph.D. at Virginia Tech over 28 years and was Professor at National Sun Yat-Sen University, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 1990. He was Dept. Head, 1999, and ASE Co. sponsored Chair Professor, 2011. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and serving as an Editor of J. of Nanotechnology, Hans Publishing Co., since 2010.

Abstract:

Fiber/metal composites (FMCs) have attracted much attention over twenty years, especially in aerospace and aeromechanical structures. In addition to their advantages of fiber reinforced composites, they also possess superior resistance to cyclic loadings. The Al/APC-2 hybrid nanocomposite laminates were first fabricated. The Al alloy 2024-T3 thin sheets were treated by chromic acid anodic (CAA) method to achieve perfectly bonding with matrix PEEK eventually. The average values of received notched strength were affected significantly by stress concentration and high temperature. The modified point stress criterion (PSC) was used. The predicted notched strengths by the modified PSC model were not only precisely validated, but applied at elevated temperatures. Then, Ti/APC-2 hybrid nanocomposite laminates were fabricated. The nanoparticles SiO2 were uniformly spread on the interfaces of APC-2. Tensile tests at room and elevated temperatures were conducted to obtain the mechanical properties. To predict and verify the feature of knee point the residual stresses and strains were calculated by simple methods. Adopting the residual stress effect and rule of mixtures, the analytical stress-strain curves at elevated temperature were obtained. Predicted values of ultimate strength are lower than those of the empirical data. Finally, the tension-tension constant stress amplitude cyclic tests were performed to obtain the S-N curves. In comparison, we found that the longitudinal stiffness of Ti/APC-2 nanocomposite laminates increase about 10%-35% higher than that of Ti/ APC-2 laminates, the strength about 5%-15%, and the life about 3-5 times.

Serhii Shafraniuk

Northwestern University, USA

Title: Advanced research and nanotechnological applications of Graphene

Time : 11:05-11:25

Speaker
Biography:

Serhii Shafraniuk has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 26 years from Kiev State University and postdoctoral studies from Kiev University Department of Physics. He is the research associate Professor at Northwestern University, a premier nanotechnology research organization. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and serving as an Organizing Committee Member of several international conferences.

Abstract:

The nanotechnology research nowadays are directed towards many areas which in particular include (i) nanosensors, (ii) digital logic elements, (iii) THz applications, (iv) quantum dots, (v) industrial and automotive applications. At Northwestern Univeristy, we conduct experimental and theoretical researches which are focused on the following topics. (a) Quantum dots as elements of the THz and magnetic field nanosensors. (b) Andreev reflection as a probe of interface properties. (c) Efficient carbon nanotube and graphene thermoelectric nanocoolers and energy generators. Our experimental devices involve multiterminal graphene and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (G-FET). The G-FET fabrication process aims to yield the CNT and graphene quantum dots. The G-FET devices had been fabricated as follows. The resonant character of chiral tunneling and the low inelastic scattering rates serve as reasons why the ac current density can be much higher than in ordinary semiconducting devices. By measuring the dc current-voltage curves of G-FET quantum dots which are exposed to an external THz field, we are able to determine the THz field parameters. In this way, we are utilizing the G-FET which actually works as a very sensitive and efficient THz field sensor. We find that the G-FET setup has a strong potential for designing of the THz sensor arrays, graphene made qubits, and THz lasers. Other potential applications of the G-FET include very efficient nanoscale thermoelectric coolers and the energy co-generators. We conclude that the graphene and carbon nanotube based setups can perform much better than other known devices.

Speaker
Biography:

Yoshinori Yamamoto has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 27 years from Tohoku University, Japan and postdoctoral studies from Purdue University, Chemistry Department. He was the director of WPI-AIMR (2007- 2012), vice president of Tohoku University (2006-2007), and Professor Emeritus at Tohoku University (from 2012), and now he is Professor at DLUT (from 2012). He has published more than 670 papers in reputed journals and was the executive board of editors for Tetrahedron Publications (1995-2012). He is a recipient of Humboldt research award (2002, Germany), A. C. Cope Scholar Award (2007, ACS), and Centenary Prize (2009, RSC).

Abstract:

Molecular transformations using gold, palladium and copper nanoporous skeleton catalysts and the reactivity difference between those catalysts and the corresponding well-known homogeneous molecular catalysts will be discussed. For example, Pd nanoporous skeleton catalysts (PdNPore) can be fabricated through dealloying Ni and P from the corresponding Pd-containing alloy PdxNiyPz. AuNPore (gold nanoporous catalyst) can be fabricated through dealloying Ag from AuxAgy alloy. PdNPore-catalysed Suzuki-coupling, AuNPore-catalyzed hydrolysis of silanes, and CuNPore-catalyzed click reaction will be presented. Selective semi-hydrogenation of alkynes has been achieved with AuNPore catalyst. Atomic origins of the high catalytic activity of AuNPore have been clarified using HRTEM, STEM, and others.

Albert Verdaguer

ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Spain

Title: Understanding the freezing of water on surfaces at the nanoscale to control ice formation at the macroscale

Time : 11:45-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Albert Verdaguer completed his Ph.D. in Physics in 2001 at the University of Barcelona. His doctoral thesis dealt with computer simulation of liquids. He spent two years at the Nanometric Techniques Unit of the Scientific-Technical Services of the University of Barcelona, using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques in a wide range of different studies. He continued his postdoctoral research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (California, USA), focusing on imaging water films at the nanoscale with SPM. In 2006, he moved to his current institution, ICN2, in Barcelona, Spain. He is presently in charge of two research lines, one on development of SPM techniques and another, on studying water films on surfaces at the nanoscale.

Abstract:

Freezing of liquid water at the troposphere is usually activated by a particle or surface, in a process called heterogeneous nucleation. The water-surface interactions determine the efficiency of a surface to induce ice nucleation. Researchers have been searching for materials to efficiently control ice nucleation. Although the phenomenon has been studied for decades, its molecular basis remains poorly understood. Thanks to the development of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the structures of water films on surfaces have begun to be determined at cryogenic temperatures (in vacuum) conditions and under ambient conditions. By studying water structures on surfaces at ambient conditions, we aim to establish whether the surface properties believed to enhance ice nucleation are relevant for efficient surface ice nucleation at the macroscale. These studies should help researchers to identify and predict the properties-and by extension, the substrates-that most efficiently nucleate ice. Our group is currently endeavouring to advance knowledge in this area as well as to exploit state-of-the-art self-assembled monolayer (SAM) technology to fabricate coatings that can convert a surface into an efficient ice nucleator.

Break: Lunch Break 12:05-12:50 @ Coral AB

Horacio J. Salavagione

Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros, Spain

Title: Development of methods for Graphene production and chemical modification

Time : 12:50-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Horacio J. Salavagione obtained his B.Sc. in Chemistry (1998) and Ph.D. in Chemistry (2003) from the National University of Río Cuarto (Argentina). He moved to the University of Alicante where he spent three years as a postdoctoral fellow working on conducting polymers. He presently holds a Ramon y Cajal senior research fellowship at the Institute of Polymer Science and Technology, of the Spanish Scientific Research Council, CSIC. He has published around 40 scientific papers and 2 book chapters. His current research interests are centered on novel materials for functional applications, including chemical functionalization of graphene and carbon nanotubes, and the design and preparation of carbon nanotubes and graphene-based polymer nanocomposites.

Abstract:

The field of graphene has drawn much attention over the last 6-8 years mainly due to the outstanding properties of graphene and its potential for application in almost every discipline including electronics, aeronautics, biomedicine, energy storage, etc. However, there are two issues that represent a problem from the practical point of view and need to be resolved: 1) the lack of an effective method for the synthesis of high quality graphene in large quantities, and 2) the inertness of graphene, which limits its processability and therefore its incorporation into, for instance, biological systems. Our investigation is devoted to solve these two issues and this talk will present an overview of existing methods for graphene synthesis, and will highlight the advantages and weaknesses of using electrochemical tools. Moreover a series of synthetic strategies addressed in our laboratory for the covalent modification of graphene with simple molecules bearing different functional groups (NH2, COOH, SO3H, -C + C-, etc.), and polymers will be described. These methods include esterification/amidation, coupling with diazonium salts, nitrene chemistry and 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition generally known as “click” reactions. In spite of the important differences between these routes, all the reactions proceed relatively well. In fact, some of these reactions have been successful for the direct modification of graphene with polymers. The methodology has been applied to a wide variety of polymer families, including biocompatible poly (vinyl alcohol) and poly (ethylene oxide).

Masayoshi Tange

National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan

Title: Polymer wrapping technique for selective extraction of specific large-diameter semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

Time : 13:10-13:30

Speaker
Biography:

Masayoshi Tange has completed his Ph.D. from University of Tsukuba, Japan, in 2007. He was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) research fellow (DC2 & PD) from April 2006 to March 2008 and a JSPS research fellow (PD) from April 2009 to March 2010. Currently, he is a senior researcher at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). His current research interests are in the synthesis and optical properties of low-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes-based nanocomposite.

Abstract:

Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show metallic or semiconducting features because the electric structures significantly change with their tube structures (i.e. tube diameter and wrapping angle). Actually, semiconducting SWCNTs exhibit intense near-infrared fluorescence, but metallic SWCNTs do not. In addition, SWCNTs have inner space in which other materials can be confined. For example, we can encapsulate fluorescent molecules into SWCNTs via the vapor phase of the molecules. The arrangement of the confined molecules changes with tube diameter. For uniform electronic properties of SWCNTs and the homogeneous arrangement of confined molecules, SWCNTs with specific tube structures are desirable. However, as-produced SWCNT materials are the mixture of SWCNTs with various tube structures. For small-diameter SWCNTs (<1.2 nm), there are several methods to obtain specific SWCNTs from the as-produced SWCNT materials. On the other hand, selective extraction of specific large-diameter SWCNTs is rather difficult owing to the stronger bundling effect of large-diameter SWCNTs. Recently, using the polymer wrapping technique which leads to individually dispersed SWCNTs, we have revealed that poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-pyridine) (PFOPy) can preferentially disperse specific large-diameter semiconducting SWCNTs in toluene via ultracentrifugation. On the basis of the tube-structure dependence of photoluminescence, the tube structures in their polymer-extracted semiconducting SWCNTs were identified by photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The F8BT-extracted SWCNTs exhibit intense fluorescence of (15,4) SWCNTs, which are 1.38 nm in tube diameter, while the PFOPy-extracted large-diameter SWCNTs show 1500 nm emissions with a narrow diameter distribution. The results indicate that the fluorene-based copolymers are useful as wrapping polymers to selectively extract specific large-diameter SWCNTs (>1.2 nm).

Biography:

Gholamreza Yazdi has completed his Ph.D. (Title: Growth and characterization of AlN-from nanostructure to bulk material) in 2008 at Linkoping University. He is now working as assistant Professor at the same university. His research focuses on growth and characterization of graphene on SiC. He has about 30 papers and recently one of his papers on graphene field is accepted in journal of Carbon.

Abstract:

Graphene growth was performed on 4H-SiC(0001), 6H-SiC(0001), and 3C-SiC(111) substrates in argon atmosphere at 2000 °C. Grown graphene was assessed by AFM, LEEM, ARPS, STM, and STS. Graphene formation and its thickness uniformity have been analyzed in respect to step bunching and surface decomposition energy differences on different SiC polytypes. The uniformity of silicon sublimation is an important factor for obtaining large area homogenous graphene. We have demonstrated a monolayer (ML) graphene growth on all SiC polytypes, but larger area, over 50x50 μm2, on 3C-SiC substrates. 6H-SiC shows close quality of graphene to that on the 3C-SiC, because half of the unit cell contains three Si-C bilayers. The results on 4H-SiC show that graphene formation process has narrower window of growth parameters. Graphene wrinkles easily, by compressive strain due to the thermal mismatch of graphene and SiC induced during sample cooling. Wrinkles are linear defects which can cause carrier scattering and decrease mobility. Deep understanding and control of wrinkle appearance are central to our current research. By modifying substrate conditions we have been able to change the wrinkle orientation from a random network to a full alignment in a particular direction or radial. We will present effect of thermal cycling, cooling down to 4 K, and ambient conditions on graphene layer and wrinkles. Adsorption of ambience species was observed to be more pronounced on a ML graphene. Wrinkling was studied in a series of computer simulation with the molecular dynamic method using AIREBO forcefield and Tersoff potential.

Fatima Z. Bouanis

Institut Francais des Sciences et Technologies des transports, France

Title: Approach for synthesizing individual, controlled diameter SWNTs for electronics

Time : 13:50-14:10

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Fatima Zahra Bouanis, She completed her Postdoctoral form Laboratory of Physics of interfaces and Thin Films (LPICM) & Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (LCI) - University Paris Sud, France and Engineering from National Superior school of Chemistry of Lille (ENSCL) Since 2009 my research area is focusing on nanostructured materials synthesis and nanotechnologies. I am presently involved in carbon nanotubes and graphene, synthesis and their applications for advanced electronics and nanodevices (CNTs based FETS, gas/biological sensors….).

Abstract:

Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are still regarded as excellent candidates for applications in nanoelectronic devices due to their unique structure and their remarkable electrical properties. They have been investigated for various applications ranging from single electron transistors and field-effect transistors to memories, chemical and mechanical sensors, and measurement probes. However, the electronic performances of such devices still strongly depend upon the SWNT diameter and chirality as well as their crystalline quality. The development of new methods enabling precise control over the structural properties (and consequently the electronic properties) of SWNT is of paramount importance for future progress in CNTsbased electronic applications. Here we report, a robust and versatile approach for reproducible and controllable growth of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) technique coupled with atomic hydrogen (Hat) pretreatment to control the catalytic metallic nanoparticles morphology and density. This new approach represents a first step towards a general route to control the yield, the diameter distribution and possibly the chirality of nanotubes. The nanoparticles are obtained from a self-assembled pre-catalyst monolayer using a two-step strategy. Initial oxide-type growth substrate is functionalized by silanisation with a coordinating organic compound, forming a first SAM of ligand. Then, a SAM of metallic complexes such as ruthenium porphyrin (RuTTP) or salts (FeCl3, RuCl3) is grafted onto the first SAM. Precise morphology and chemical composition as well as density control of the metallic nanoparticles are achieved by a subsequent pyrolysis step under radical hydrogen atmosphere. Using the as-formed nanoparticles as catalysts, SWNTs are grown by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD).They exhibit remarkably high crystalline quality, with well controlled yield and diameter strongly dependent on the initial catalyst species. Field effect transistors (FETs) with excellent performance characteristics were obtained using such in-place grown SWNTs as channel. The electronic properties of SWNTs can also be tuned using this approach. Indeed, the transistors obtained from RuTTP and FeCl3 as catalysts precursors exhibit ON/OFF current ratio up to ~108, indicative of the direct growth of mostly semi-conducting SWNTs. By contrast, devices obtained from RuCl3 salts display ON/OFF current ratio well bellow 102, indicating the direct growth of highly metallic specimens enriched SWNTs.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Self-assembly is a promising technology for creating reliable functional films on substrate and nanomaterials. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) play an important role in modifying the substrate or nanomaterials interfaces which is applicable to stabilize metallic nanoparticle for CNTs synthesis, fabrication for hybrid materials and device application. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes and graphene, have attracted intense interest in recent years due to their remarkable physicochemical properties. The arrangement of the advantages of both SAMs and carbon nanomaterials has been opening up a flourishing research field. The unique role of SAMs acting as active layers in carbon nanomaterials, controlling the carrier type and even installing new functionalities could incorporate diverse molecular functionalities into nanocircuits that might be useful to fabricate devices in future.

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Cecília Salvadori is an Associate Professor in the Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo (USP). She received her Ph.D. in Materials Science from USP and conducted post-doctoral studies at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At this moment, she is the group leader of the Thin Films Laboratory in the Institute of Physics of USP. The main research interests are surface modification, including ion implantation, nano/microfabrication and plasma treatment; thin film deposition using plasma; surface characterization by scanning probe microscopy. She has over 90 publications in reputed journals, 8 Ph.D. concluded supervisions and collaborates with various groups worldwide.

Abstract:

Nanocomposites formed by metal nanoparticles embedded in an insulating matrix have some interesting electrical characteristics. Materials of this kind are of interest from a fundamental perspective as well as for applications. We investigated nanocomposites of Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. In all cases the nanocomposite was produced through metallic ion implantation in insulating substrate, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples was used for direct visualization of the nanoparticles formed. The nanocomposites were characterized in situ by measuring the resistivity as the implantation proceeded. The surface resistivity measurements were compared with the predictions of a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport through the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by the metallic nanoparticles. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. It was possible to conclude that the conductivity process is due only to percolation and that the contribution from tunneling conduction is negligible. Computer simulation using the TRIDYN computer code was used to estimate the depth profiles of the metallic ion implanted in the insulating substrate. This is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface.

Biography:

Abstract:

We report the photovoltaic and optical, electrical and structural properties of p-i-n solar cell developed by microwave surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Carbon thin films were synthesized by microwave (MW) surface wave plasma (SWP) CVD on quartz, silicon and copper substrates. The detail of MW SWP CVD and substrate cleaning process is described elsewhere. Argon, acetylene, tri ethyl boron and phosphine were used as a carrier, source and dopant gases. The CVD chamber was evacuated to a base pressure at approximately 5×10-4 Pa using turbo pumps. The launched microwave power was typically 1100 W and a constant gas composition pressure is maintained at 40 Pa during film preparation. For film characterization, UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer, high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM), Raman spectroscopy, Halls effect measurements and solar simulator were employed. The preliminary photovoltaic characteristics of the cell reveals a shortcircuit current density of 33.18 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.39 V, FF=0.243 and photoelectrical conversion efficiency of 3.9%, a reproducible result. The spectral photo response characteristic of the device configuration was explained in terms of transmission/absorption characteristics of the two individual carbon layers. The detailed results and discussions will be presented during the conference.

  • Track 1: Nanomaterials (Session 2)
Location: Salon A
Speaker

Chair

Toshihiro Ishikawa

Ube Industries, Ltd., Japan

Speaker

Co-Chair

Vijaya Kumar Rangari

Tuskegee University, USA

Session Introduction

Hiroshi Matsui

Tohoku University, Japan

Title: Dynamics of protonic transport through the nanochannel water in molecular porous crystals

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Hiroshi Matsui has earned his Ph.D. in 1992 from Tohoku University, Japan. Afterwards, he became JPSJ research fellow (1992-1994) and experienced postdoctoral studies in Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University (1994-1995). In 1995, he moved to Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. In 1998, he returned to Tohoku University, and now he is the associate Professor. He is an expert in optical properties of solids with extremely wide range of electromagnetic waves. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals. For his recent studies, he was awarded JPSJ papers of editors’ choice in 2010.

Abstract:

Confined water in nanometer-scale geometries has interdisciplinary importance because such water molecules hold unique properties like rapid flow rate and high proton conductivity relating to functionalities of biological materials, fuel cells, and applications for selective filters, nanofluidics devices, etc. Among wide variety of porous materials, single-file water molecules embedded in carbon nanotube are considered as a typical-model system for physicists, and many computer simulations have been performed so far. Nevertheless there is a little experimental result owing to the difficulty to obtain good single crystal. In high-quality molecular porous crystals with millimeter-order length, we have performed systematic studies on crystal structural analysis, infrared spectrum and microwave conductivity. In [CoIII(H2bim)3(TMA) 20H2O]n salt, we have already reported that the water nanotube (WNT) embedded in the hydrophilic nanochannel is an intrinsic proton conductor with high mobility. The proton and protonic hole form Eigen-type hydrates, around which local distortions are induced. In {[CoIII(H2bim)3(TATC) 7H2O]n salt, we have obtained for the first time much narrower nanochannel accommodating the highly one-dimensional water chain constructed by 6 water molecules per unit. The proton and protonic hole forming Eigen-type hydrates also exist in the water chain, whereas the conducting property is huge different from one in WNT. We expect that the proton and protonic hole are respectively combined with D and L configurational defects, and these carriers transfer through the antiferroelectricordered water chain. The protonic transport and the ordering of water chain must be dominated by the interfacial interaction in connection with the charged site in the framework.

Speaker
Biography:

Masaru Matsuo has completed his Ph.D. at Kyoto University in Japan and he was a Professor of Nara Women’s University. After his retirement, he becomes a Professor of Dalian University of Technology in China. He has published about 200 papers in refereed journal articles. He is IUPAC fellow and he received Paul Flory Polymer Research Prize on April 2010.

Abstract:

The characteristics of nanomaterials have been explored to attain enhanced mechanical properties and to achieve certain levels of electric conductivity through a percolation networks. The reported treatments contain precise experimental descriptions but the theoretical analyses are not still established. The reasons are 1) no method for testing mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction intensity under electric field, different from usual techniques by external forced heating and 2) misunderstanding for thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction. Conductive (or semi-conductive) property of carbon filler-polymer composites certainly provides the temperature increase by Joule heat under applied electric field, but no method has been reported for testing mechanical and morphological properties under applied electric field precisely. This presentation deals with frequency dependence of the dynamic tensile modulus of carbon filler-polymer composites under applied electric field, different from classical measurements by external forced heating. To establish successful methods, home-made attachments were fixed on commercial instruments. The measurements are done for polyimide-vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) composites and ultrahigh molecular weight linear polyethylene (UHMWPE)-nickel coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites. The theoretical analyses were done in terms of thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction. As the results, PI-VGCF composites were confirmed to be very stable to Joule heat arisen by electron collision against atoms on PI chains. In contrast, UHMWPE-NiCF provided X-ray intensity curve from only amorphous halo by perfect disappearance of crystal diffraction peaks at 129.0 oC (the equilibrium melting point, 145.5 oC) and storage modulus decreased drastically at low frequency indicating damage of positive temperature coefficient (PTC) materials against low-frequency earthquake.

Break: Coffee Break 15:50-16:05 @ Bora Foyer

Vijaya K Rangari

Tuskegee University, USA

Title: Carbon nanotubes and their applications in polymer composites

Time : 16:05-16:25

Speaker
Biography:

Vijaya K. Rangari is an associate Professor at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tuskegee University. His main research interests are: a) Synthesis of various types of nanoparticles with different surface chemistries, shapes and sizes using CVD, sonochemical and microwave techniques; and b) Alignment of acicular nanoparticles in polymeric fibers through single screw melts extrusion for multifunctional textile applications. c) Applications of magnetic and bio-based nanoparticles for medical applications. He has published about 77 research articles in reputed journals, 100 conference proceedings and 3 chapter books.

Abstract:

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the extensively studied nanostructured materials because of their unique electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. In particular, carbon nanotubes are unique and ideal to decorate various nanoparticles allowing the construction of designed nanoarchitectures that are extremely attractive as supports for heterogeneous catalysts, and multifunctional composite structural applications. This presentation will give you an overview of synthesis of metal and metal oxides such as silver (Ag), gold (Au), copper (Cu), diamond, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles coated CNTs using microwave and sonochemical methods. Pristine CNTs were synthesized using first nano-300 CVD technique and iron based metal catalyst. The as prepared hybrid nanoparticles were further infused into the nylon-6 or epoxy resin system using melt extrusion process or non-contact mixing process to produce hybrid nanoparticles based polymer nanocomposites. However, in fiber reinforced polymer nanocomposites one of the major disadvantages of nanofillers such as carbon nanotubes is the entanglement and agglomeration in the matrix. Improving poor dispersion and lack of alignment of carbon nanotubes in the matrix materials is a major challenge to the improved mechanical performance of nanocomposites and hybrid composites. To address some of these issues we have also in-situ grown CNTs on carbon fiber using catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. These CNTs grown carbon fabrics were further fabricated in to laminates using a well-known vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process. A two part (SC-780) epoxy resin was used as polymer matrix. These polymer nanocomposites were tested for their thermal, mechanical, and microscopic properties.

Speaker
Biography:

Toshihiro Ishikawa is fellow of Ube Industries, Ltd and also, is academician of World Academy of Ceramic and fellow of American Ceramic Society. He has conducted very important research & development on SiC-based fibers, composite materials, and nano-sized-titania/silica-based photocatalytic fibers, and so force. Regarding these researches, he has published more than 100 papers including two Nature papers and one Science. He lots of awards and prizes, for example: Yamazaki Teiichi Prize, Award from the Minister for Environment, and so on.

Abstract:

We have developed functional ceramics by precursor methods using polycarbosilane (-SiH(CH3)-CH2-)n which is representative pre-ceramic polymer for preparing SiC ceramics, for example, Hi-Nicalon fiber and Tyranno SA fiber. Furthermore, silica-based fibers can also be produced from the polycarbosilane by firing in air. Our unique technology makes full use of the bleed-out phenomenon of low molecular mass additives intentionally mixed in the polycarbosilane. Here, we have treated a polycarbosilane with Ti(OC4H9)4 or Zr(OC4H9)4, and have created a strong, fibrous photocatalyst with a surface TiO2 nano-layer, or a highly alkali-resistant (and excellent oxidation-resistant) SiC-based fiber with a surface ZrO2 nano-layer. And also, we developed a new concept for creating surface meso-pores in which noble metals are selectively deposited by photoelectrical deposition. The meso-pores are formed in the interstices between crystal-arrays composed of sintered photoactive nano-crystals whose boundaries are strictly controlled for creating continuous coherent bonds. Furthermore, in the recess of the pore, a heterogeneous insulator phase exists. The aforementioned coherent crystalline structure causes a smooth electron flow from the outside to the inside of the array through the coherent boundaries of the nano-crystals during photo-deposition accompanied by the outside-hole consumption and noble metal deposition in the recesses of the surface meso-pores. We created this structure by a natural phenomenon. Our new concept is applicable to a wide range of functional materials, and should find use in the preparation of excellent photocatalysts, redox catalysts and photochromic materials. In this paper, the unique production process and the characteristics of the obtained fibers will be discussed.

Victor Abrukov

Chuvash State University, Russia

Title: Knowledge base is a future of nanomaterials world

Time : 16:45-17:05

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Modeling is still emerging to become the key for industrial progress in areas ranging from materials research to the development of novel and improved applications. Currently, a lot of experimental data on properties and characteristics of various nanomaterials are obtained in the entire world. The question is how we can summarize it and present in the form of common models allowing description the characteristics of previously studied nanomaterials? It is obvious that the characteristics of nanomaterials related to the composition of nanomaterials and type of components, manufacturing technology, the shape and size. The question is how we can generalize these links as computational models (CM) that allow determining the characteristics of the nanomaterials without carrying out additional experiments? Even more important question, is it possible to predict what should be the nanomaterial (structure, components, and dimensions) and what technology should be used with to provide the required properties and characteristics of nanomaterials? We present an example of the results of application of data mining (DM) in particular artificial neural networks (ANN) to create such CM. They are based on experimental results for the characteristics of nanofilms of linear-chain carbon (LCC) (carbine) with embedded into LCC various atoms (LCCA). For the first time LCCA were manufactured in the Chuvash State University, using unique technology protected by a patent, and using a variety of know-how. The direction of work can be of great interest for active and passive elements of solid-state electronics, photovoltaic elements, sensors, medical applications, etc. The data mining (DM) is a complex of contemporary tools for experimental data pre-processing, processing, analysing, and modelling. The DM involves such kinds of tools as various data pre-processing and processing tools (missing data recovery, fix abnormal values, finding duplicate and conflicting records, spectral processing), analysing tools (factor analysis, correlation and autocorrelation analysis, linear and logistic regression), modelling tools (decision trees, artificial neural networks (ANN), selforganisation maps - Kohonen maps, association rules, the user model). The ANN as universal tool for approximation of several variables experimental functions plays a major role in terms of a creation of CM in order to generalize the experimental data and predict the properties and characteristics of nanomaterials. To date, we have developed two CM (ANN-models) that allow us to reveal all dependences between variables, to generalize them and to calculate the physical-electrical and optical properties of LCCA in dependence on amount of kind of atoms (one or two kinds) embedded in a LCCA, kind of atoms (number and group of atom in accordance with the Mendeleev’s periodic table), and the thickness of the LCC MNA: 1. The model of "Current-Voltage Characteristics of the LCCA”, 2. The model of "Transmission coefficient spectrum of the LCCA”. The models allow us to predict the current-voltage characteristic and transmittance spectrum of any new sort of LCC MNA. The models allow us also to solve an inverse task: to determine what amount of kind of atoms, what kind of atoms, and what the thickness of the LCC MNA should be to provide the required “Current-Voltage Characteristics” and "Transmission coefficient spectrum” of LCC MNA. Outputs: An analysis of results obtained has depicted that: 1. The CM correctly “determines” the current-voltage characteristics and transmission coefficient spectrum of LCCA and it is the good approximation tool of multidimensional experimental functions. 2. The CM correctly reveals all dependences of the current and transmission coefficient on other parameters and it is the good tool for generalization and prediction of connection between variables. 3. The CM instantly calculates a value of the necessary characteristic and it is the fast engineering calculator specialized to LCC MNA. 4. The CM easily gets any characteristics of a hypothetical sort of LCCA and it is the cheapest way for receiving of “new experimental” results without an experiment. 5. The CM illustrates vividly all dependences and it is a good tool for presentation of experimental results obtained. The CM obtained is the knowledge base of LCCA as well as prototype of a future knowledge base of nanomaterials world. 6. The CM obtained is the knowledge base of LCCA as well as prototype of a future knowledge base of nanomaterials world. The work is partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 13-02-97071).

Jeffrey J. Urban

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA

Title: Understanding energy and mass transport in designer nanocrystal-polymer hybrids

Time : 17:05-17:25

Biography:

Jeffrey J. Urban is currently the Facility Director, Inorganic Nanostructures & Lead of LBL DOE Thermoelectrics Program, MSD Lead on Water-Energy Initiative, Lead of LBL HyMARC Hydrogen Storage Program. He persued his Postdoctoral Studies in Synthesis and Measurements of Nanocrystal Transistors, Thermoelectrics, and Photovoltaics with Professor Christopher B. Murray, University of Pennsylvania & Graduate Studies in Synthesis and Physical Characterization of Transition Metal Oxide Nanostructures with Professor Hongkun Park, Harvard University. His current research includes development of new materials and measurement tools for solid-state energy storage and conversion applications. One central topical area of interest involves investigating transport at the organic-inorganic interface.

Abstract:

The interface between hard and soft condensed matter presents new and compelling research opportunities in the transport of energy and mass due to the dramatic contrasts in bonding energy, chemical interactions, and transport modalities between these constituents. Here, I will discuss my group's research efforts at designing, characterizing, and modeling the transport properties of nanocrystal-polymer hybrid systems, which I have developed as platforms for understanding the critical role that interfaces can play in dictating transport properties. Specifically, this talk will encompass two thematic areas in this space. I will first discuss energy transport in the context of thermoelectrics for Te nanorod-PEDOT:PSS polymer hybrid materials, and gas transport and storage in Mg nanocrystal:PMMA polymer hybrid materials.

Xin Chen

East China University of Science and Technology, China

Title: Recent In situ wet cell TEM study on nanomaterials and nano devices

Time : 17:25-17:45

Speaker
Biography:

Xin Chen has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 33 years from University of Houston and postdoctoral studies from University of Houston. He served as visiting research assistant Professor in University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and he is now Shanghai Thousand Plan Professor in East China University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals, made invited talks in several international conferences, and edited a book. He is a referee of over 15 reputed journals, and he has served as committee member in several reputed research societies and international conferences.

Abstract:

An in situ wet cell TEM set up was made and used to study various nanomaterials and nano devices. In the set up, liquid samples were sealed between two ~50 nm thick Si3N4 windows, which prevented liquid leaking into the vacuum system, while allowed electron beam penetration for the TEM analysis. Gold and silver nano particle in aqueous solution samples were characterized, image resolutions better than 1 nm have been obtained. Both discrete particle and nano cluster forms were observed in the two samples. Dynamic behaviors in these aqueous systems were observed and analyzed. A suspension of silver/ polypyrrole (Ag/ppy) sample was further prepared and characterized with this set up, and the Ag nano cores and the ppy nano shells were clearly observed from the nano composites in solution. Moreover, thin film electrodes were deposited onto the Si3N4 windows, forming electrochemical devices with liquid electrolytes sealed in the wet cell. The electrodes were connected to the outside testing system through thin wires, and nanoscale electrochemical cycling behaviors in the wet cell have been successfully observed. In situ wet cell TEM represents a recent trend in nano technology, and many exciting new developments are being expected in this field.

Hassan Korbekandi

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: Nanoparticles synthesis through bio-reductions by microorganisms and plants

Time : 17:45-18:05

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Hassan Korbekandi ‘s Education 02/1999- 12/2003 Ph. D. in Biotechnology, titled: “Biotransformations using Peptostreptococcus productus”, Chem. Eng. Dept., UMIST, Manchester The potential of an anaerobic acetogenic bacterium, for reduction of C=C and C=N bonds to produce asymmetric useful products was studied. The growth and enzyme (phenylacrylate reductase) activity was optimised in a chemostat. The substrates and products were analysed using HPLC and GCMS. Between the prochiral substrates containing C=C bonds, niroalkens were reduced almost completely, and amphetamine was produced from 2-nitro-1-phenyl-1-propene. 09/1987- 09/1993 Pharm. D. (Doctor of Pharmacy), School of Pharmacy, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Modules (All in theory & practice) covered included Biology, Mathematics, Statistics, Biophysics, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Microbiology, Parasitology, Immunology, Pharmacology, Pharmacognosy, Biotechnology, Pharmaceutics, Biopharmacy, Clinical Pharmacy, Industrial Pharmacy, Quality control and Thesis” Tableting and clinical trial of a lactation promoter plant extract”.

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Jan Sickmann is currently completing his Ph.D. in Physics at Triebenberg Laboratory, a division of the Institute of Structural Physics at Dresden University. He has been working on electron holography for four years. In his diploma thesis, he developed advanced holography setups for mapping electric fields in semiconductor devices. Currently, he is working in the field of strain mapping in transistor structures within a research project of the European Union, the State of Saxony and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden.

Abstract:

Off-axis electron holography provides access to the phase of the object-modulated electron wave mostly invisible in a transmission electron microscope. Since the phase shift of an electron wave is considerably more sensitive to intrinsic electric and magnetic fields than the amplitude, it serves as the key observable for mapping such object properties on the nanoscale. Measuring potential distributions in silicon based devices and polarization in magnetic domains, like in magnetic shape alloys, nowadays ranks among standard applications in off-axis electron holography. As an extension of this 2D analysis technique, we present 3D reconstructions by electron holographic tomography enabling direct measurement of the electrostatic potential without the drawbacks of 2D imaging, e.g. thickness determination and projection effects. In fact, it allows the precise determination of charge carrier concentration of electrons and holes across p n junctions at nanometer scale. Mapping strain fields in advanced semiconductor devices is considered to be another powerful application in off-axis electron holography. Since the phase of the diffracted wave is proportional to the displacements in a strained lattice, it provides direct access to local changes in the lattice parameter, leading to a 2D strain map. To emphasize the reliability of this application, we present strain measurements on state-of-the-art MOS transistor structures and use finite-element-simulations to confirm our results. Since a quite new application in electron holography exists

Wei Zhang

Dalian University of Technology, China

Title: Smart textiles based on carbon nanotubes

Time : 18:25-18:45

Speaker
Biography:

Wei Zhang joined Department of Engineering Mechanics in Dalian University of Technology (China) in 2011. He worked a research fellow at Advanced Technology Institute in The University of Surrey (UK) and had been a member of the research faculty since 2008 after he received a Ph.D. in Materials Science in The University of Leeds (UK). His research interest includes smart textiles, nano composites, and dyeing and finishing. His research work has results in over 50 journal and conference papers. He was the chair of Chinese Textile & Apparel Society-UK (2008-2010).

Abstract:

The dream to incorporate functionality into textiles has inspired tremendous efforts to produce smart textiles, which may find their applications in sportswear, foldable display, portable power, healthcare, military and work wear, etc. Owing to their unique properties, carbon nanotubes have recently been used to functionalize conventional textiles and endow textiles with new function. By a dipping-drying procedure, in this work, nylon and cotton were functionalized with organic dye dispersed carbon nanotubes through the operation of Van der Waal’s forces, hydrogen bindings and ionic bondings. The attachment of carbon nanotubes onto fabrics were suggested by Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These functionalized fabrics can be curved and knotted randomly, demonstrating good flexibility of the fabrics. When the functionalized fabrics were treated with solvents, heat, or a combination of both, no obvious nanotube dissociation and precipitation was observed, reflecting the robust interactions between nanotubes and fabrics. The obtained nylon was used to make a capacitor structure, which possesses the merits of light weight, little hysteresis, and low power dissipation. The resultant cotton was used to make chemiresistors, which shows reasonable response to ammonia gas. All the structures can be easily integrated into clothing to make wearable electronics and intelligent textiles.

  • Track 1: Nanomaterials (Session 3)
Location: Fiji
Speaker

Chair

Bernd Rellinghaus

IFW Dresden, Germany

Speaker

Co-Chair

Stoyan Sarg Sargoytchev

York University, Canada

Speaker
Biography:

Stoyan Sarg Sargoytchev obtained his Ph.D. in Physics from Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1984, while working on space research projects of program Intercosmos coordinated by former Soviet Union. From 1990, he was a visiting scientist at Cornel University. From 1992, he took positions of scientist at Canadian government institutions working on space and atmospheric research. His participation in diversified interdisciplinary projects inspired him to develop his theoretical work, Basic Structures of Matter-Supergravitation Unified Theory. After first publishing in 2001, he published articles, reports in conference proceedings, application developments and books by amazon.com.

Abstract:

The basic structures of matter-supergravitation unified theory (BSM-SG) reveals non-spherical shapes of the stable elementary particles, composed of two types of helical structures with opposite twisting. Proton and neutron have one and the same toroidal sub-structure, but the shape of proton is a twisted torus like the figure 8, while the neutron is double folded. The shape of proton permits modulation of the space fabrics creating a positive E-field. At neutron, such modulation is locked in the near field, so it is not detectable, but when in motion it creates a magnetic field. Due to its near E-field, the neutron is stable over the proton, forming a deuteron. The electron is a different three body system with two intrinsic frequencies. Its structure and dynamic properties provide classical explanations of: Compton frequency, anomalous magnetic moment, spin and relativistic effect of mass increase. The near Coulomb field of the proton defines the trace of orbiting electron. The atomic nuclei are 3D compositions of protons and neutrons, kept by the attractive supergravitational forces, while balancing the repulsive forces between protons. The increase of number of protons reveals the build-up trend of the atomic nuclei showing a perfect match with the pattern of the periodic table. The features defining the valences and the angular restrictions of the chemical bonds are apparent. The rotational freedom of neutrons over protons is behind the nuclear magnetic moment. The BSM-SG atomic models are convenient for 3D graphical modeling of complex molecules and nanostructures with sub-nanometer resolution.

Hideyuki Yoshimura

Meiji University, Japan

Title: Synthesis of protein encapsulated rear earth nanoparticles

Time : 10:50-11:10

Speaker
Biography:

Hideyuki Yoshimura has completed his Ph.D. in 1982 from Nagoya University and postdoctoral studies in Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN). He moved to Biometrology Lab in JEOL Ltd., as a research staff in 1984. He was also joining JRDC, ERATO NAGAYAMA Protein Array project from 1990 to 1995, as a manager of Array Characterization Group. After 1995, he moved to Meiji University, Department of Physics, as an associate Professor. He promoted to Professor in 2000 at the same department. His current interests are development of an X-ray microscope for biology and synthesis of nanoparticles utilizing protein function.

Abstract:

To get homogeneous nanoparticles (NPs), protein (apoferritin) cavity has been utilized as a reaction chamber. Protein shells served as a template to restrain particle growth and as a coating to prevent coagulation between NPs. Apoferritin is an iron storage protein found in many biological species, known to mineralize several metal ions in vitro. It is a hollow, spherical protein composed of 24 subunits, with outer and inner diameters of 13 nm and 7.4 nm, respectively. Here, I report synthesis of rare earth NPs (yttrium (Y), europium (Eu) and terbium (Tb) NPs, and Eu or Tb doped Y NPs) in the cavity of apoferritin. The diameter of each NP is around 7 nm and discrepancy of the size is within 1 nm. Eu and Eu doped Y (Y:Eu) nanoparticles exhibit red photoluminescence (emission peaks: 590 and 614 nm), while Tb and Tb doped Y (Y:Tb) nanoparticles exhibit green photoluminescence (emission peaks: 488, 544, 582 and 618 nm). High-resolution electron microscopy observations reveal that about 5% of the nanoparticles have a lattice structure, while the remaining nanoparticles are amorphous. Electron diffraction of the Y nanoparticles gives lattice spacing’s corresponding to the cubic structure of yttrium oxide (Y2O3). Photoluminescence intensity increases by increasing dopant concentration up to 60% of the host in Y:Eu and 40% in Y:Tb. Because nano-meter scale particles are homogeneously dispersed in the solution, concentration quenching typically observed in bulk sample would be suppressed.

Speaker
Biography:

Bernd Rellinghaus has earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Duisburg, Germany. Awarded with a Research Stipend of the German Science Foundation hethen joined the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA, USA. In 1997 he returned to Duisburg and moved to Dresden, Germany, in 2004, where he since then heads the Department for Metastable and Nanostructured Materials at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW Dresden). Bernd Rellinghaus is an expert in metallic materials, nanoparticles(particularly in nanomagnets)and in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. He has published about100 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Due to their large potential for a variety of applications, metallic nanomagnets have attracted considerable attention in the last decades. Among those, nanoparticles with very high magnetic anisotropies are particularly interesting as active materials for future ultra-high density magnetic data storage applications. Here, intermetallic alloys of the chemically ordered L10 phase such as L10-FePt are considered as one of the most promising materials candidates, as they combine magnetic hardness with a high resistivity against oxidation. In this talk,some of our recent work on the correlation between the atomically resolved structure of such FePt nanoparticlesand their magnetic properties will be presented. The investigated materials range from particles that are prepared by inert gas condensation and subsequent in-flight rapid thermal annealing to sputtered thin particulate FePt-X films for future heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR, films provided by HGST - A Western Digital Company). The gas-phase prepared L10-FePt nanomagnets are found to exhibit relatively low coercive fields and switching field distributions (SFD’s) that are limited to the range 0 T ≤μ0Hsw≤2 T. Remanence analyses reveal that the magnetic anisotropy of these particles is size dependent, which is due to a (partial) segregation of Pt towards the particle surface as evidenced from aberration-corrected HRTEM and MD simulations. In contrast, the SFD of the particulate FePt-X films peaks at fields as high as μ0Hsw≅6 Tand the L10-ordered FePt particles are highly textured due to their growth on a MgO seed layer at elevated temperatures [1]. The influence of (i) a certain discrepancy between a remaining misorientation of the crystallographic [001] axes of the FePtnanomagnets and the magnetic texture width as determined from the hard axis remanence of the particulate film and (ii) the presence of thermally instable particles on the overall magnetic performance will be discussed.

Shien-Uang Jen

Institute of physics, academia sinica, ROC

Title: Hardness of the Fe81Ga19/Si(100) film measured by the nano-identation method

Time : 11:30-11:50

Speaker
Biography:

Shien-Uang Jen has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 29 from the Physics Department of Carnegie-Mellon University. He is now a senior research fellow of the Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica. He has published more than 123 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Fe81Ga19 alloy is an auxetic material, which means that its Poisson’s ratio along the [110] direction, V[110], is negative. When this alloy is deposited on a single-crystal Si(100) wafer, the film is highly (110) textured. Thus, if we indent the film plane with a Berkovich indenter vertically, the apparent hardness obtained with the parameter Veff=V[110]=-0.55 < 0 should be larger than that with Veff=V[110]=+0.30. This is reasonable, because if Veff is negative, the deformed material under the pressing indenter tends to push the tip slightly upward (or backward). As a result, the measured depth of circle of contact, hp, of this auxetic film is smaller than it should be under a fixed force, F, and, moreover, since the hardness H≡F/[24.5(hp)2], the apparent (measured) hardness must be larger. We have made a series of (Fe100-xCox)81Ga19/Si(100) films, and measured their hardness. The results indicate that: [1] when 0≤x<7 at %Co, the films (or alloys) are auxetic (Veff<0); [2] when 7≤x≤11 at %Co, they are critical (Veff=0); and [3] when 11 0). Each point on the loading or un-loading curve was analyzed by the finite element analysis to show the side-view of the shear-stress (τ) distributions in the film, film/substrate, and substrate regions, respectively. We can study (or outline) the plastic-flow zone beneath the indenter by adopting the Tresca criterion: τ ≥ H/6.

Dominique Ausserre

Universite du Maine, France

Title: Ferrochemical materials

Time : 11:50-12:10

Speaker
Biography:

Dominique Ausserre has completed his Ph.D. in 1985 in College de France, Paris. He joined the CNRS in 1986 and was a visiting scientist in IBM Almaden in 1987. He started a new lab in Institut Curie in 1988, and moved to Universite du Mans in 1991. He is Director of research in CNRS since 1993. As the main inventor of the SEEC technique, he launched the start-up Nanoraptor in 2001. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and filled about 15 patents, extending from instrumental optics to the physics of surfaces, complex fluids and polymers.

Abstract:

Amphiphilic molecules such as phospholipids, smectic liquid crystals or diblock copolymers are chemical dipoles which, under appropriate conditions, spontaneously line up side by side in a ferro-like chemical arrangement to form stable asymmetric monolayers. In three dimensions, these monolayers stack in a head-to-tail or anti-ferro like arrangement, which favors monopolar contact between similar species. It results in a symmetric bilayered lamellar material. Here we show how the use of triphilic rather than amphiphilic molecules will produce stable self-assembled smectic stacks with a fully polar, hence non centro-symmetric, ordering. We describe in details a generic model of such materials. It is made of a mixture of three triblock copolymers aBc, bCa and cAb with their end blocks twice sorter than the corresponding middle block. The three molecules line up in periodic columns such as aBc/cAb/bCa. Due to dipolar interactions, each neighbouring molecule has a unique orientation with respect to the three different chemical layers, and the composition of the whole material is oriented (ABC/ABC/ABC...). For instance, half (due to entropic mixing) of bCa molecules will match side by side with aBc/cAb. As a consequence, a polar structure with remarkable thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities is expected. We name these new materials “ferrochemicals”. In case where the molecules are triblock copolymers, the lamellar stack can be used as an organic matrix hosting and orienting inorganic Janus particles in order to get a large variety of hybrid polar materials with interesting non linear optical, ferromagnetic, or ferroelectric properties.

Sergey Gusarov

National Institute for Nanotechnology, Canada

Title: Application of multiscale theory and modeling to nanoscience and nanotechnology

Time : 12:10-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Within past two decades, computational modeling and simulations has become an important part of applied research. It has become possible because of big step forward in development of modern computational methodology and improvements in computer hardware and software. Computational modeling allows one to represent the system with high level of details, to understand the physics of the processes and make predictions which can be used for further rational design. However, the application of computational methods to nanoscience and nanotechnology has some specialties. Typically nano-sized system has several characteristic lengths and timings and so the different approximations have to be applied to different levels of description. That led to the necessity of use of multiscale approaches to represent the nanosystem in the better way. However, the development of methods which efficiently couple multiple scales is still state of the art, because there is no uniform approach on how to combine the different theories. Typically system is subdivided by several overlapping levels each of which includes the averaged description of the rest of the system. In that work, I am going to present the collective efforts of National Institute for Nanotechnology (Edmonton, Canada) in application of different multiscale approaches to real nano systems in the different areas: nano-electronics, nano-catalysis, polymer- and surface chemistry.

Break: Lunch Break 12:30-13:15 @ Coral AB
Speaker
Biography:

Aaron Catledge received his Ph.D. in Materials Science from The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in 1999, where he continued postdoctoral studies and is now assistant Professor in Physics. His research career has focused primarily on nano-biotechnology as it applies to development of nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic/dental implants, electrospun composite scaffolds for tissue regeneration, and nanodiamond fluorescence in biosensing. He has more than 55 peer-reviewed publications in the period from 2003-2013, which includes 3 book chapters as 1st author.

Abstract:

The primary research objective is to investigate chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) metal-boride interfacial layers on CoCrMo alloy as a robust diffusion barrier to prevent chemical interaction of elemental cobalt with carbon, which would otherwise lead to graphite formation during subsequent Nanostructured diamond (NSD) growth. The NSD coating itself is inherently comprised of crystalline and amorphous components with both sp3-and sp2-carbon bonding, and can be made to exhibit high hardness (H=60-90% that of phase-pure diamond). We show that a body-centered tetragonal interfacial boride (Co2B) is created and provides an effective diffusion barrier to enable well-adhered NSD coatings on CoCrMo. Interestingly, migration of molybdenum is suppressed after boriding, and does not appear on the surface. Most boron is present as borides with very small contributions from boron nitrides and oxides. Chromium remains primarily in elemental form on the surface, but with minor amounts of chromium nitrides/oxides. Most importantly, elemental cobalt is not present on the surface as measured by glancing-angle x-ray diffraction. While pack boriding of steels is common (e.g. for machine tool applications), the structure and diffusion barrier properties of borided CoCrMo, especially made by CVD, is not well known. The experimental findings of this research will demonstrate that the primary adhesion obstacle for CVD diamond on CoCrMo can finally be overcome by creating robust metal-borides fully compatible with the CVD process and substrate. Potential applications include alternative total joint replacement wear couples utilizing nanostructured diamond (NSD) surfaces instead of conventional metal-on-metal or metalon- polyethylene bearings.

Peter Lebedev-Stepanov

Photochemistry Center of Russian Academy of Science and National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Russia

Title: Simulation of self-assembly in an evaporating inkjet-sized droplet of colloidal solution by dissipative particle dynamics

Time : 13:35-13:55

Speaker
Biography:

Peter V. Lebedev-Stepanov, Ph.D., Physics and Mathematics now is an associate Professor of Physics at National Research Nuclear University ‘MEPhI’ (since 2009), head of the Research Laboratory of self-organization of nanoparticles and photonics of nanostructured patterns at Photochemistry Center of Russian Academy of Sciences (since 2007). His researches focus on the statistical physics and physical chemistry of open systems, self-organizations, computer simulations of properties of charged nanoparticles and their ensembles, and interaction of colloids in solution. He has more than 120 scientific publications.

Abstract:

A method of Brownian dissipative dynamics of charged colloidal nanoparticles in microdroplet of solution deposited on plane substrate is proposed for investigation of self-assembly and self-ordering of colloids during solute evaporation. Method is based on the numerical solution of multi-scale Langevin equation for each particle, the hydrodynamic microflows approach, and droplet evaporation model. It takes into account the DLVO-forces between the particles, their interaction with the substrate (adhesion, friction, and roughness); Stokes’, Brownian, and capillary forces (wetting and depinning, outflow angles, and surface tension). The nature of coffee ring effect was studied. It is shown that the hexagonal domain ordering of particles ensemble in pattern can be formed onto plane substrate as a result of interparticle repulsion and the capillary compression during evaporation of solvent. Numerical results are in good agreement with inkjet technology experiments. Modeling demonstrated that by the varying roughness, surface adhesion, wettability and other parameters, it is able to control the degree of ordering of the solid phase, formed as a result of particles self-assembly in an evaporating microdroplet.

Speaker
Biography:

Teruo Kanki has completed his Ph.D. in Material Physics from Osaka University in 2004. After serving as a visiting researcher in IBM’s Almaden Research Center from 2004 to 2006, he became a specially appointed assistant professor in Osaka University. Now, he is an associate Professor in Osaka University and works on novel and new concept oxide nano-electronics. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Strongly correlated electron systems are of much interest for the development of highly sensitive sensors and memories that utilize the Mott transition. Especially high temperature phase change materials are promising to lead to realization of their practical devices. When focusing on the nano-spatial area in these materials, metallic and insulating states are randomly mixed, forming domains with several hundreds of nanometer in scale near metal-insulator transition (MIT). Each domain plays an essential role in determination of observed electronic transport properties. The key point for effective control and artificial designing of the transport property is to arrange random domain configuration and to manipulate MIT in each domain. In this presentation, I will demonstrate the manipulation of transport properties by artificial control of the spatial domain configuration through control of the size and aspect ratio of VO2 thin films which is a typical phase change material. A random configuration of two dimensional (2D) metallic domains was observed intypical films with several hundreds of micrometers in scale, showing moderate MIT at 300 K, following the 2D percolation model. In the case of the 1D domain configuration in micro-scaled films, on the other hand, the apparent transition temperature drastically shifts from approximately 294 K in the 1D parallel domain configuration to 312 K in the 1D series one. Notably, a very steep and abrupt resistive drop occurs in the parallel configuration. Thus, I experimentally made it clear that the domain configurations have a crucial impact on the determination of the electrical transport properties.

Mohamed F Foda

Huazhong Agricultural University, China

Title: Versatile silica coating strategy on hydrophobic quantum dots towards nano-engineering

Time : 14:15-14:35

Speaker
Biography:

He-You Han has completed his Ph.D. in 2000 from Wuhan University. He is the Dean of Science College, at Huazhong Agricultural University. His research interest focuses on Nanosensors and Food Safety. He has published more than 70 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member in many journals for example Journal of Analytical Science, The Journal of Light Scattering, and The American Journal of Biomedical Sciences.

Abstract:

Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) possess several advantages including 10 times brighter, mainly due to their wide absorption reign, compared with fluorescent proteins and organic dyes, ultra-stable against photobleaching, and present narrower and more symmetric emission spectra. More interesting, multicore QDs can be excited using single light source. In addition, hydrophobic QDs for biomedical aspects and nano-engineering fabrication should be perfectly synthesized allowing robust, reproducible and specifically sufficient biological probes in the optical window of 500-900 nm to be achieved. In current work, an effective, versatile and direct silica coating strategy on hydrophobic QDs based on organosilane micellization and silicate deposition for nano-engineering purposes were carried out. This method skipped the conventional water solubilization step for oil-soluble QDs and greatly favored the fluorescence preservation by confining the QDs in a lipophilic interior of a silica bead. By this manner, we created a series of CdSe/ZnS@SiO2 nano-spheres ranging from 16 nm to 38 nm with multi-core structure and a tunable silica shell thickness. These nano-spheres exhibited a quantum yield of 90% relative to the oil sample, colloidal stability in biological medium and robust photochemical. Another approach to incorporate multiple hydrophobic I-III-VI2 QDs for example copper indium sulfide directly into silica beads with a relative small size around 20 nm. The silica coating layer maintained the emission properties of QDs regarding the photoluminescent spectrum, quantum yield and the PL lifetime. Also, silica coating on metal affinity induced QDs nano assemblies towards ultra bright, stable and color encoded fluorescent spheres were successfully achieved.

  • Track 2: Nanostructures
Location: Fiji
Speaker

Chair

Hiroshi Yao

University of Hyogo, Japan

Speaker

Co-Chair

Hiroshi Uyama

Osaka University, japan

Session Introduction

Kimihisa Yamamoto

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Title: Fine-controlled metal-assembling using a dendrimer reactor

Time : 15:15-15:35

Speaker
Biography:

Kimihisa Yamamoto received his Ph.D. from Waseda University in Polymer Chemistry in 1990, respectively. He was research associate and associate Professor of Waseda University from 1989 to 1990 and from 1991 to 1996, respectively. He had been a Professor of the Department of Chemistry at Keio University since 1997. He is now a Professor of Chemical Resources Laboratory in Tokyo Institute of Chemistry. He received the award for the Young Chemist and the Divisional Award from the Chemical Society of Japan in 1996 and 2008, and the JSPS Wiley Award in 2005 from the Society of Polymer Science, Japan. He was also awarded the Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, in 2012.

Abstract:

We show that tinchlorides, SnCl2 and FeCl3 complexes to the imines groups of a spherical polyphenyl- azomethine dendrimer in a stepwise fashion according to an electron gradient, with complexation in a more peripheral generation proceeding only after complexation in generations closer to the core has been completed. The metal-assembly in a discrete molecule can be converted to a size-regulated metal cluster with a size smaller than 1 nm as a molecular reactor. Due to the well-defined number of metal clusters in the subnanometer size region, its property is much different from that of bulk or general metal nanoparticles. Here, we show that tin ions, Sn2+, complex to the imines groups of a spherical polyphenylazo-methine dendrimer in a stepwise fashion according to an electron gradient, with complexation in a more peripheral generation proceeding only after complexation in generations closer to the core has been completed. By attaching an electron-withdrawing group to the dendrimer core, we are able to change the complexation pattern, so that the core imines are complexed last. By further extending this strategy, it should be possible to control the number and location of metal ions incorporated into dendrimer structures, which might and uses as tailored catalysts, building blocks, or fine-controlled clusters for advanced materials. Many metal ions can be assembled inside the phenylazomethine dendrimer with a phenylene core (DPA) by the strong coordination ability of the imines in DPAs. During the complexation of DPA G4 with SnCl2, four shifts in the isosbestic point were observed in the spectra, which mean that the complexation proceeds in four steps. The titration results show that SnCl2 molecules are assembled from the core to the terminals of DPA G4 in a stepwise fashion. This radial stepwise complexation was also observed for the other dendrimers with phenylazomethine dendron skeletons. The basicity of the inner imines is enhanced by the electron-releasing effect of the outer imines, and the stepwise complexation is caused by the different basicity of the imines between the shells. This complexation behavior means that the number and the position of the metal ions in the dendrimers are controllable.

Break: Coffee Break 15:35-15:50 @ Bora Foyer

Hiroshi Yao

University of Hyogo, Japan

Title: Photofunctional organic nanoparticles

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Hiroshi Yao has earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Hokkaido University, Japan. He has been an Associate Professor of University of Hyogo since 1999. His current research interests include fabrications of metal (inorganic) or organic nanoparticles with interesting optical/chiroptical properties. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and books.

Abstract:

Photofunctional organic nanoparticles have inspired growing research interests because of their variability and flexibility in materials synthesis as well as high potentials in the application of optoelectronic devices. Covalent synthesis of such architectures is costly, so we have developed a new route for the synthesis of organic nanoparticles based on ion-association. This method utilizes the formation of water-insoluble ion-pair aggregates in aqueous phases by association of a chromophoric ion with a hydrophobic counterion to fabricate organic nanoarchitectures. We here report the synthesis/property of highly fluorescent organic dye nanoparticles with various particle sizes and colors based on ion association. A blue-fluorescent cyanine dye (BFD) is used as a photofunctional material for the nanoparticle synthesis. In comparison with the dye in water, the BFD nanoparticles show a significant increase in their fluorescence. The fluorescence also increases with a decrease in the nanoparticle size, resulting in a high quantum yield of about 0.8. The observed intense fluorescence is found to originate from a combined effect of restricted “intramolecular” rotation and “intermolecular” H-aggregation of BFD. Additionally, we combine a FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) concept with the ion-association approach to obtain photofunctional (fluorescent) organic nanoparticles having multi-color emission tunability. Upon addition of a dopant molecule in the BFD nanoparticle, the emission color changed from bluish to reddish or whitish. Note that the pure dopant exhibits red emission. We believe that organic nanoparticles of a binary dye system fabricated using the ion-association method is able to have tunable emission with high fluorescence quantum yields or “mega” Stokes shift.

Speaker
Biography:

Hiroshi Uyama received his B.S. (1985) and M.S. (1987) from Kyoto University. In 1988, he joined the Department of Applied Chemistry, Tohoku University, as Assistant Professor and obtained Ph.D. in 1991. He moved to the Department of Materials Chemistry, Kyoto University in 1997. In 2004, he was appointed as a full Professor at the Department of Materials Chemistry, Osaka University. He has published more than 250 papers, 170 reviews and accounts, and 130 patents.

Abstract:

Monolith, a three-dimensional porous material having a continuous interconnected nanoscale pore structure in a single piece, has received much attention as functional materials such as chromatographic separation media, ion exchange resins, and catalyst supports due to its large air and liquid permeability, fast mass transfer performance, high stability and easy chemical modification. This study deals with fabrication of polymeric monoliths with nanoscale porous (mesoporous) structure by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was insoluble in water but soluble in a mixture of water and DMSO at heating. A mesoporous monolith of PAN was fabricated by dissolution of the polymer in the mixture of solvents by heating, followed by phase separation on cooling. The formation of monolith depended on two factors: the concentration of the polymer and ratio of water/DMSO. A highly mesoporous N-doped activated carbon monolith was fabricated by carbonization and physical activation of the mesoporous PAN monolith in the presence of CO2. The obtained monolith had high BET surface areas (>2500 m2/g) and exhibited exceptionally high CO2 uptake; 5.14 mmol/g at ambient pressure and temperature and 11.5 mmol/g at ambient pressure and 273 K. Furthermore, functional monoliths were prepared from reactive acrylic resins. A poly(methyl methacrylate-co-glycidiyl methacrylate) monolith was crosslinked by poly(ethylenimine) to the amine-containing monolith. Endotoxin, which must be removed from drug product containers as even small amounts, could be efficiently and selectively removed by this monolith from an aqueous solution containing endotoxin and globulin under the conditions of the fast elution.

Speaker
Biography:

David Holec studied mathematics and physics at Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. After completing his Ph.D. in materials science at the age of 28 years from University of Cambridge, UK, he has joined the group of Prof. Paul H. Mayrhofer at Montanuniversität Leoben, Austria. Currently, he is the head of the Materials Modeling Group at the Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Austria. He has published more than 35 papers in peer-review journals.

Abstract:

The alloying concept has been long known to allow for fine tuning of material properties, not only in-between the borders set by the boundary systems, but sometimes also reaching beyond the performance limits of the individual constituents. The recent trend in materials science is to effectively combine theoretical modeling with experimental work in order to gain deeper understanding of processes which are e.g., difficult to approach experimentally, but also to guide the experiments. In this paper, we explore the capabilities of standard density functional theory calculations to reliably predict structural, mechanical and electronic properties of alloys. To model the disordered alloys, we employ special quasi-random structures. As the first example, we will discuss the maximum solubility limit of Al in cubic TiN, an archetype of hard coatings. In agreement with experimental observations, the transition from cubic rock-salt to wurtzite structure (ground state of AlN) is predicted at ~0.7 Al content on the metallic sublattice. Situation gets more complex in isovalent Zr- Al-N and Hf-Al-N systems where a dual-phase region develops between the single phase fields. Single elastic constants are nowadays a standard quantity to calculate. Here, we show the compositional trends for quasi-binary nitride coatings and will demonstrate the strong impact of texture on polycrystalline elastic constants. The latter is especially important for any comparison of theoretical and experimental results. In the final part, we will discuss the predictions of electronic structure and ELNES (electron energy loss near edge structure) for nitride hard coatings and wide band-gap semiconductors.

Makoto Yasutomi

University of the Ryukyus, Japan

Title: Interparticle interaction between water molecules

Time : 16:50-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Makoto Yasutomi completed his PhD at Nagoya University. He worked in University of the Ryukyus for many years as Instructor. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Why does liquid water have a maximum density at 4oC? Although the question has long been studied by many different authors so far, it is not still cleared what thermodynamic mechanisms induce them. Thermodynamic properties of liquid water are determined by the interparticle interaction. We will obtain the interaction which reproduces experimentally measured density-temperature relation at 1 bar and radial distribution function. The accuracies in a temperature range of -20

Kazutaka Ikeda

High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan

Title: Synthesis, atomic structure and hydrogen storage properties of aluminum hydride

Time : 17:10-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Kazutaka Ikeda received his Ph.D. from Tohoku University in 2006. During his Ph.D. and postdoctoral studies at Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, he was also a research fellow for young scientists of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. After serving as an assistant Professor at the same institute, he moved to Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) as a research associate Professor. His current research interests include material design of hydrogen storage materials and structural study by comprehensive use of multi-probes such as high intensity neutrons and synchrotron light.

Abstract:

Aluminum trihydride (AlH3, alane) is one of the potential candidates for hydrogen storage materials because of high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities (10 mass% and 149 kgH2/m3, respectively) and a simple hydrogen desorption reaction (AlH3→Al+3/2H2) at 370-470 K. In-situ microscopic observations combined with thermal, surface and atomic structural analyses confirmed that primary AlH3 particles of size 100 nm-1 μm were covered by an oxide layer of thickness 3-5 nm. Both the precipitation/grain-growth of metallic Al of size 1-50 nm and an increase in boundary space were clearly observed inside the particles, while the morphologies of the particles covered by the layer did not change during the hydrogen desorption reaction. We investigated the structures of AlD3/AlH3 before the hydrogen desorption reaction by high intensity neutron (BL21 high intensity neutron total diffractometer (NOVA) in J-PARC)/X-ray diffraction (BL02B2 in SPring-8) measurements. The presence of χ-Al2O3 on the surface may prevent the deuterium/hydrogen desorption reaction of AlD3/AlH3 to Al at room temperature.

Jae Hong Park

Korea National NanoFab Center, Korea

Title: Reversible nano-lithography between materials

Time : 17:30-17:50

Speaker
Biography:

Jae Hong Park has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 33 years from Seoul National University and postdoctoral studies from Korea Institute of Science and Technology and Harvard Medical School, respectively. He is a senior researcher of National NanoFab Center in Korea. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed SCI journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

One of the two main processes of engineering nanostructures is the top down method, which is a direct engineering method for Si-type materials using photolithography or e-beam lithography. The other method is the bottom-up method, using nano-imprinting. However, these methods are very dependent on the equipment used, and have a high process cost. They are also relatively inefficient methods in terms of processing time and energy. Therefore, some researchers have studied the replication of nano-scale patterns via the soft lithographic concept, which is more efficient and requires a lower processing cost. In this study, accurate nanostructures with various aspect ratios are created on several types of materials. A silicon (Si) nanomold is preserved using the method described, and target nanostructures are replicated reversibly and unlimitedly to or from various hard and soft materials. The optimum method of transferring nanostructures on polymeric materials to metallic materials using electroplating technology was also described. Optimal replication and demolding processes for nanostructures with high aspect ratios, which proved the most difficult, were suggested by controlling the surface energy between the functional materials. Relevant numerical studies and analysis were also performed. Our results showed that it was possible to realize accurate nanostructures with high depth aspect ratios of up to 1:18 on lines with widths from 300-400 nm. In addition, we were able to expand the applicability of the nano structured mold by adopting various backing materials, including a rounded substrate. The application scope was extended further by transferring the nanostructures between different species of materials, including metallic materials as well as an identical species of material. In particular, the methodology suggested in this research provides the great possibility of creating nanostructures composed of various materials, such as soft polymer, hard polymer, and metal, as well as Si. Such nanostructures are required for a vast range of optical and display devices, photonic components, physical devices, energy devices including electrodes of secondary batteries, fuel cells, solar cells, and energy harvesters, biological devices including biochips, biomimetic or biosimilar structured devices, and mechanical devices including micro- or nano-scale sensors and actuators.

K. N. Shinde

N.S. Science and Arts College, India

Title: Highly efficient single host white emitting Sr2.91V2O8:Eu0.06 nanophosphor for UV-LED

Time : 17:50-18:10

Speaker
Biography:

K. N. Shinde has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 30 years from R. T. M. Nagpur University, Nagpur, India and postdoctoral studies from Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul, South Korea. At present, he is the director of R&D at N. S. Science and Arts college, Bhadrawati, India. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial/reviewer of international journals. His research interests are synthesis of nanocrystalline materials and exploring novel materials and study their PL and TL properties. Recently, he published a book on “Phosphate Phosphors for Solid State Lighting” with International Publication Springer series in Material Science.

Abstract:

Solid state lighting is the ultimate solution for the replacement of conventional incandescent and fluorescent lamps so it is called as next generation lighting. Nowadays, white LEDs manufactured using an n-UVLED coupled with a blend of yellow-and blueemitting phosphors. A novel white emitting Sr2.91V2O8:Eu0.06 nanophosphor was successfully prepared via solution combustion method with aspartic acid as a fuel. Its excitation wavelength ranging from 250 to 430 nm fits well with the characteristic emission of UV light-emitting diode (LED). The excitation and emission spectra indicate that these phosphors can be effectively excited by the near-UV light, and emit blue to red light (visible range). Moreover, the present nanophosphor exhibited an excellent color-rendering index when annealed at 950 0C temperature. The Sr2.91V2O8:Eu0.06 nanophosphor thus shows excellent emission characteristics under a UV excitation and had a uniform particle size distribution which is favorable for high performance LED. The obtained material was found particle size in few nanometer ranges. The maximum emitting peak centered at about 513 nm when Sr2.91V2O8:Eu0.06 phosphor excited by 330 nm. All the similar broadband emission observed which covers nearly the whole visible light region from 400 nm to 700 nm. The emission intensity increased with increasing temperature and reaches high at 950 0C. These results indicate that the synthesized nanophosphor may be strong candidate for single host white light emitting phosphor for white LEDs.

Speaker
Biography:

Adeloye Adewale Olufunsho received a B.Sc. (Hons.), Chemistry from the Ondo State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria, 1994. He proceeded to study Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. He registered for a doctoral study at the University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa in 2008 and was awarded a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2011. He has 17 published articles in peer-reviewed accredited journals to his credit with an appreciable number of citation volumes. He has worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at two different universities in South Africa.

Abstract:

Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs; Grätzel cells) are considered one of the promising solar cell technologies of the future. Traditionally, DSSCs utilize a mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 film covered with ruthenium-bipyridyl-based dyes as the photoelectrode material and triiodide/iodide as the redox relay in the electrolyte. Such cells have reached conversion efficiencies above 11% at AM 1.5 solar irradiance. In the cells, the dye is one of the key components for high power conversion efficiencies. The pioneering studies using cis-dithiocyanatobis(4,4'-dicarboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II) (N3) is a paradigm in this field. Major drawbacks of the N3 dye are low molar extinction coefficient, durability and lack of absorption in the red region of the visible spectrum. New focus and development in the dye-sensitized solar cell research comes from the preparation of amphiphilic heteroleptic N3-equivalents, nanocrystalline TiO2 semiconductor, and/or electrolyte. It is on the basis of these major tasks of optimizing the conversion efficiencies of the DSSC that the current research work is undertaken. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) bipyridine/phenanthroline mixed ligand complexes bearing a simple anthracene anchored on unsaturated α,β-carboxylic acid functionality. The ruthenium complexes are constructed in a first step with the ligands bearing the required bromine functions, followed by a stepwise grafting of anthracene halide derivative promoted by palladium-carbide catalysis. The UV-vis absorption spectra of complexes in chloroform-methanol (1:1, v/v) solution displayed broad and low energy metal-to-ligand-charge transfer transitions (1MLCT) at λmax between 520-700 nm (ε = 3.80-6.60 x 103 M-1 cm-1) with a significantly enhanced band tail, improving red light absorptivity beyond 915 nm. At room temperature, complexes showed high intensity and appreciable emission wavelengths between 660 and 690 nm. The electrochemical redox properties of the complexes showed single- to multi- electronic transfer reactions. The solar to electrical energy conversion efficiency, DFT and EIS properties of the complexes are currently under investigation.

Fahad Al-Mubaddel

King saud University, Saudi Arabia

Title: Toxicity of nano structures

Time : 18:30-18:50

Speaker
Biography:

Fahad Al-Mubaddel is currently working in King saud University, Saudi Arabia. His research interests are Agricultural Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering

Abstract:

Research work on the synthesis, designing and characterization of nanostructures has been extensively documented in the last decades. This in-depth documentation not only enabled researchers to understand the relationship between the nanostructure properties, size, shape, and composition but also have given them immense control over their manufacturing. This enhanced knowledge, cemented the switching of academic nanotechnology research into industrial products. However; despite the recent accomplishment in synthesis, characterization and application of the nanostructure materials, a complete knowledge/information of their interactions with biological systems is still not available. Hence, it is difficult to forecast the injurious biological responses of these novel nanostructures to humans, animals, insects and plants. Due to this hesitancy, safety regulatory authorities and general public have raised their concerns to the manufacturing and use of nanostructure-based products. Consequently, it is vital for the researchers to concentrate more on safe designing, manufacturing and characterization of nanostructures before these could meet human and communal needs. This review is taking an overview of the increasing investments in nanotechnology, designing, synthesis and characterization of nanostructures and their in vitro and in vivo toxicities.

Break: 18:45-20:15 Cocktails Sponsored by Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology @ Bora Foyer