Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International conference and exhibition on Food Processing & Technology Kansas City, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Symposium on Topical antioxidants for protection and reversal of environmental damage by Karen E. Burke, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, USA
Location: Grand ABC
  • Track 2: Nutritional Defi ciencies & Disorders Track 8: Food Security and Challenges Track 9: Food Regulatory Affairs
Location: Grand ABC
Speaker

Chair

Sunil J. Wimalawansa

UMDNJ
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Annette C. Bentley

American Celiac Society
USA

Session Introduction

Sunil J. Wimalawansa

UMDNJ
USA

Title: Food fortification to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies

Time : 10:50-11:10

Speaker
Biography:

Sunil J. Wimalawansa is working as a Professor of Medicine, former Chief of Endocrinology, Metabolism & Nutrition; expert in endocrinology, osteoporosis, metabolic bone disease, vitamin D and nutrition. He is an educator, author, researcher, innovator, executive board member, an administrator, and philanthropist. Research interests include osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and nutrition (micronutrients and vitamin D). He has made seminal contributions to medicine, including new modes of treating osteoporosis. In 1984, he pioneered intra-operative hormone assays to assist endocrine surgical procedures. He received multiple recognitions from professional societies, including Dr. Boy Frame Award, American Endocrine Society Glen Foundation Awards, and innovation award from Asian Chamber of Commerce. He received a coveted Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to science and humanity and Dr. Oscar Gluck Humanitarian Award. He served on national and international scientific review committees, including the NIH, VA, DEA, and NASA.

Abstract:

Break: Coffee Break 11:10-11:25 @ Grand Ball Room Foyer

Annette C. Bentley

American Celiac Society
USA

Title: Gluten-free and milk-free products to fill the dietary needs

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Annette C. Bentley has obtained M.S. degree in Medical Education from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 2003. She has also obtained a M.S. degree in Food Science from Louisiana State University in May of 2013. She founded and serves as the President of the American Celiac Society. She has been published in the Journal of General Psychology and the Who Sprue (American Celiac Newsletter) the Lifeline (CSAUSA newsletter) and the Eucharistic Ministry. She has done many presentations at conference throughout the world.

Abstract:

There is a serious need for prepared food items that are both milk-free and gluten-free. Gluten-free items created often contain milk. The products created milk-free are not necessarily gluten-free. The need has arisen because of individuals that have food allergies and/or intolerance. Approximately 6% of children and approximately 4% of adults in the western countries including the United States have food allergies. Milk is the most common of food allergies. Approximately 1% of the United States population has celiac disease. This condition results because of an immune reaction to the gliadin contained in the protein of wheat and similar grains. The toxicity of the gluten grains has been identified in the gliadin protein, which is found in wheat, triticale, rye, barley, and oats. The FDA has made a final ruling on labeling gluten-free of contains <20 parts per million of gluten and identified gluten free as products without wheat, barley and rye and their cross grains. The result of consuming the wheat protein causes the enzyme tissue transglutaminase to modify the protein and the immune system reacts by causing an inflammatory reaction. This results in the destruction of the lining (the villi) of the small intestine interferes with the absorption of nutrients. The only treatment for this problem is to avoid consuming products that contain gluten for life. Less of (1985) reported that cow’s milk provokes gluten enteropathy. It is strongly recommended celiac patients avoid any products with milk because of the absence of microvilli and villi. Villi are the mechanism by which gluten absorbs into body through the intestinal tract. The gluten flattens the villi and the individual cannot process gliadin protein from the grains. The microvilli are the mechanism for processing the milk sugars and proteins.

A.Jasmine

TBAK College for Women
India

Title: Life style diseases-Indian scenario

Time : 12:05-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

A.Jasmine Jeyaraj is an Associate Professor at Thassim Beevi Abdul Kader College, Ramanathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India.

Abstract:

Lifestyle diseases are health problems and conditions that come about as a result of our modern lifestyles. They include obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and digestive problems. Modern science through improved sanitation, vaccination, and antibiotics, and medical attention has eliminated the threat of death from most infectious diseases. This means that death from lifestyle diseases like heart disease and cancer are now the primary causes of death. Everybody naturally has to die of something, but lifestyle diseases take people before their time. Too many people are dying relatively young from heart disease and cancer and other lifestyle diseases in modern times In India, the situation is quite alarming. The disease profile is changing rapidly. The World health organization (WHO) has identified India as one of the nations that is going to have most of the lifestyle disorders in the near future. Nowadays, not only are lifestyle disorders becoming more common, but they are also affecting younger population. Hence, the population at risk shifts from 40+ to maybe 30+ or even younger. Already considered the diabetes capital of the world, India now appears headed towards gaining another dubious distinction of becoming the lifestyle-related disease capital as well. A study conducted jointly by the All India Institute of Medical Sciences and Max Hospital shows the incidence of hypertension, obesity and heart disease is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the young, urban population. According to doctors say, a sedentary lifestyle combined with an increase in the consumption of fatty food and alcohol is to blame cases of obesity, diabetes, hypertension etc. Furthermore, effective public health measures are urgently needed to promote physical activity and improve health around the world. The challenge of promoting physical activity is as much the responsibility of government, as of the people. However, individual action for physical activity is influenced by the environment, sports and recreational facilities, and national policy. It requires coordination among many sectors, such as health, sports, education and culture policy, media and information, transport, urban planning, local governments, and financial and economic planning. Towards this end, the world health organization is supporting its member States by providing nationwide evidence-based advocacy on the health, social, and economic benefits of healthy lifestyles.

  • Track 2: Fermentation Extravaganza: A New Revolution for Food and Beverages
    Track 10: Fermentation and Cell Culture Media
    Track 13: Application and Manipulation of Cultured Cells
    Track 15: Culture of Non-Mammalian Cells
Location: Grand ABC
Speaker

Chair

Angela Zinnai

University of Pisa, Italy

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jui-Jen Chang

Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Speaker
Biography:

Angela Zinnai completed his 1st Ph.D at the age of 25 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is an associate professor of Food technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a “Special Mention” at “Montana Premium” for Food Science Research (with her colleague Venturi F.). She published more than 80 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for research projects and papers. She was an author in an Original Patent of Pisa University (RM2010A000617) and a scientific responsibles for another (PT2008A000006) that received a “Special mention of the Jury” at 24° SIMEI (22-24/11/2011).

Abstract:

Over the last two decades, the vines in Italy often produce grapes with greater concentrations of phenols and aromatic compounds and greater potential wine quality but even with very high sugar concentrations. As a consequence, the musts obtained are more difficult to process because of the risk of stuck of fermentation, particularly in the warmest region. With the aim of describing the sugars bioconversion during alcoholic fermentation, the time evolution of different initial concentrations of D-glucose and D-fructose, dissolved in a model solution simulating a must (citrate buffer at pH = 3.4 inoculated by two yeast strains: S. cerevisiae (strain C) and S. bayanus (strain B), have been investigated in the presence or not of ethanol. The concentrations of both the substrates and the products of the sugars conversions, as well as the number of viable cells of yeasts, were determined as a function of the alcoholic fermentation time and the related kinetics constants determined. The enzymatic transformation of D-fructose seems to be more sensitive to ethanol accumulation than D-glucose even if there are reliable differences between two strains. If the reaction medium contained high concentrations of both glucose and fructose ( 300 g/L), the strains showed significant different fermentative ability. Moreover, in these conditions a stuck of fermentation occurred: the remaining sugar was mainly fructose but its concentration changed remarkably with the yeast strain. If the reaction medium contained only glucose as substrate, the strain C seemed more efficient while the kinetics behaviour changed in presence of only fructose.

Break: Lunch Break 13:05-13:50 @ Grand EFG

Jui-Jen Chang

Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Title: Designer host for cellulosic ethanol production via synthetic biology

Time : 13:50-14:10

Speaker
Biography:

Associate Research Fellow, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taiwan (2013) Postdoctoral Fellow, Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (2008-2013) Visiting scholar, Dept of Ecology & Evolution, the University of Chicago, USA (2012) Visiting scholar, Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Japan (2009) Postdoctoral Fellow, Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (2006-2007) Ph.D., Dept. of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (2001-2006) B.S., Dept. of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taiwan (1997-2001)

Abstract:

To achieve economical biofuel production, such as cellulosic ethanol, a host that can do both cellulosic saccharification and ethanol fermentation is desirable. However, to engineer a non-cellulolytic microbe to be such a host requires synthetic biology techniques to pursue large-scale genomic engineering of the host. We have developed an efficient high-throughput method that can simultaneously introduce many genes into a genome. It is called Promoter-based Gene Assembly and Simultaneous Overexpression (PGASO). PGASO was applied to transform multiple cellulase genes into the genome of Kluyveromyces maxianus KY3 with a single selection marker gene. Six genes of different GH families were cloned from the cellulolytic fungi Trichoderma, Aspergillus, and Neocallimastix. The recombinant strain is capable of co-expressing a cellulase cocktail and can directly convert microcrystalline cellulose to ethanol. Our study shows that a designer yeast can be developed to simultaneously express different GH genes, and our enzyme cocktail shows a synergistic effect of these enzymes in digesting cellulose. Thus, PGASO can serve as a platform to study enzyme synergism in a single host and can be used to construct a host for a cell factory for enzyme production. In addition, KY3 can be co-cultured with bacterial hosts. A designer Bacillus subtilis that carries eight cellulosomal genes of Clostridium thermocellum, including one scaffolding protein gene, one cell-surface anchor gene, and six cellulase genes, was constructed and employed as a partner of KY3 for cellulosic bioethanol production. A novel dual-microbe co-culture system is developed to improve bioethanol production.

Speaker
Biography:

Francesca Venturi completed his 1^st Ph.D at the age of 28 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is a researcher in Food Technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a "Special Mention" at "Montana Premium" for Food Science Research (with her colleague Zinnai A.). She published more than 60 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for research papers for ACS journals. She was an author in an Original Patent of Pisa University (RM2010A000617) and a scientific responsible for another patent (PT2008A000006) that received a "Special mention of the Jury" at 24° SIMEI (22-24/11/2011).

Abstract:

The fermentations induced by the utilization of sourdough in bread-making, are able to enhance the qualitative properties of the final dough, improving its volume, texture and flavour, so to obtain a bread characterized by high qualitative properties and able to retard its staling process. In particular the working conditions adopted can deeply affect the ratio occurring between the populations of lactic acid bacteria and alcoholic yeasts of the sourdough and then also the productions of the related metabolites, which deeply affect the sensory properties and also the quality of the final bread. The effect induced on the microbial and chemical composition of the sourdough by different values of the storage temperature utilised (13, 19 and 27°C) between two its successive refreshes ( 24 hours), was evaluated to put in evidence the different sensory characteristics assumed by the corresponding breads. The sensory profiles of the obtained breads evaluated by the descriptive analyses, was carried on by a panel of trained assessors who used a sensorial sheet specifically developed for this purpose and characterized by unstructured graphical intensity scales and the reliability of judgments obtained was evaluated by statistical analysis. So it was possible to put in evidence the high degree of correlation occurring among microbiological and chemical data of the sourdoughs and the sensorial characteristics of the corresponding bread. Among the three storage temperatures of the sourdough, 19 °C appears to be able to ensure the best characteristics to sour dough bread.

  • Track 4: Yeast Engineering
    Track 5: Overview of Stem Cell Culture
    Track 7:Application of Bioprocess
    Track 9: Bioreactors and Cell Culture Systems
Location: Grand ABC
Speaker

Chair

Z. Lewis Liu

National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Julio Cesar C. Rosa

Universidade Federal de Viosa (UFV), Brazil

Session Introduction

Z. Lewis Liu

National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, USA

Title: Engineering industrial yeast for renewable advanced biofuels applications

Time : 14:30-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Liu holds a PhD from University of Illinois and has more than 30 years experience in teaching and research. As a Scientist at USDA-ARS, Dr. Liu pioneered tolerant yeast research and development for lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion using genomics and published a monograph on “Microbial stress tolerance for biofuels: systems biology” by Springer. Dr. Liu holds 8 U.S. patents (including pending issues) and authored over 100 publications, and serves Editor and Associate Editor of professional journals.

Jayadeep A

Central Food Technological Research Institute, India

Title: Bio-processing to improve the nutraceuticals and bioactive properties of millet seed coat

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Jayadeep A, male, biochemist, Ph.D from biochemistry department, University of Kerala in 1993. Worked from 1992 to 99 in the Indo-US projects as Postdoctoral Fellow, Project Scientist & Research Scientist in the University of Kerala. Since 1999 working as Scientist in CFTRI and currently working as Principal Scientist. Awarded UGC Research Fellowship(1986-91); Johns Hopkins University Overseas PDF (1992-94), IUBMB Indian Award (1994); International Nutrition Foundation & Kraft Foods Visiting Scientist Fellowship(2006). Published ~30 papers and presented in 26 conferences; patented 4; industry process 4; projects handled- external 5, industry 6 and Institute 9. Past Treasurer AFST(I)& SBC(I). Fields of research interest are nutrients, nutraceuticals, bioactivity and bioaccessibility properties of grains; bio-processing by enzymatic and biotransformation methods; development of health foods; and biochemical aspects of nutrients and natural products in human health.

Abstract:

Finger millet consumption is reported to have number of health beneficial effects in prevention of life style diseases . Positive effects of it may be due to the nutrients and phytochemicals present in the seed coat or the outer most layer of the grain which covers the endosperm. Generally it is coarser in nature and application of carbohydrases can improve its functional and sensory attributes. So the objective was to study certain nutraceuticals and bioactive properties of finger millet seed coat and effect of enzymatic bio-processing on their quality. Three different sample were made from seed coat fraction of finger millet such as raw (without any treatment), test (treated with carbohydrase and dried) and control (treated like test without any enzyme). As the part of analysis of nutraceuticals, characterization of vitamin E was carried out by HPLC; and free polyphenols extracted with methanol and bound with acidic methanol and analysed by Folin-Ciocalteu method. Bioactivity properties assessed by vitamin E activity calculation, total antioxidant activity measurement by phosphomolybdenum reagent method and free radical scavenging activity by DPPH+ method. It was observed that, compared to raw and control seed coat, enzyme processed test samples contain higher free polyphenols, bound polyphenols and total polyphenols. HPLC analysis showed that seed coat contains mainly gamma-tocopherols and alpha- tocopherols and enzymatic processing resulted in increase of gamma, alpha and total tocopherols. Bioactive property in terms of vitamin E activity, total antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity were also higher. It may be concluded that finger millet seed coat is rich in bioactive components and appropriate enzymatic processing to enhance its functional and sensory attributes will result in improvement of its nutraceutical content and bioactive properties which will ultimately enable its use as a health food ingredient.

Speaker
Biography:

Julio Cesar C. Rosa is graduated in Biological Sciences and he holds a Master’s degree in Agricultural Microbiology. He completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV) with a focus on a survey of the biotechnological potential of yeast for production of a variety of compounds such as second generation ethanol, biopolymers, hydrolytic enzymes, primary and secondary metabolites, peptides and vaccine. He worked at Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB) from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. Currently, he is postdoctoral researcher from Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Abstract:

The enediol ascorbate or L-ascorbic acid (L-AA), known as Vitamin C, it is an important metabolite in many organisms. The L-AA is naturally synthesized in plants from D-glucose by 10 steps pathway. The epimerization of D to L-substrates, which is rare in nature, is a crucial step to generate the galactose enantiomer in the L-AA pathway. Budding yeast produces a 5-carbon analogue, Dehydro-D-arabinono 1.4-lactone (D-DAL), which is synthesized from D-arabinose. The structural enzymes motifs involved in D-DAL biosynthetic pathway resemble those of the L-AA pathway in plants. Yeasts are able to synthesize L-AA only if it is cultivated in the presence of some of its precursors. Kluyveromyces lactis is one of the most important non-Saccharomyces yeast species used as eukaryotic model and tool for biotechnological applications including an alternative host for heterologous gene expression. K. lactis has the ability of growing, by respiration, on a wide range of substrates, including lactose with low glucose repression. To avoid feeding the yeast culture with the L-AA precursors, we have engineered K. lactis with L-AA pathway genes from plant. The recombinant yeasts were capable to produce about 30 mg.L-1 of L-AA in 48 hours of incubation when cultured on rich medium with 2% (w/v) D-galactose. We also evaluated the L-AA production culturing recombinant recombinant strains in cheese whey, a waste product during cheese production, as an alternative source of lactose. This work is the first attempt of engineering K. lactis cells for L-AA biosynthesis by fermentation taking advantage of its natural ability to grow on lactose and without any exogenously addition of its precursors in the growth medium.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed Emad A. Nasser has completed his Ph. D in Agriculture, 1999, Faculty of Agric., Kagoshima Univ., Japan and visitor Professor at September - November 2005, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan then, visitor Professor at June, 2007 - May 2008, Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, Sao Paulo University, CENA-USP, Brazil. Dr. Nasser is professor of rumen microbiology. He is supervising on many students of Master and Doctor Course. He has attended many international scientific conferences and workshops. He involved in many scientific research projects. Dr. Nasser has published more than 58 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

The use of renewable energy sources is currently becoming unavoidable necessity for several reasons such as the price of oil is increasing; oil is non-renewable source of energy and pressures strongly on the global environment. The use of biomass to produce energy is one of the recent important topics for two different reasons. The first, energy production from biomass will reduce the environmental pollution, but the second, use of important crops such as wheat and corn for energy production is unethical practice. Many of the third world countries are suffering from food shortages. Recycling agricultural residues and lignocellulosic biomass for sustainable production of biofuels may present a practical solution. Ethanol made from biomass provides unique environmental, economic strategic benefits and can be considered as a safe and cleanest liquid fuel alternative to fossil fuels. An aerobic fermentation technology is important in enhancing crop residue use efficiency, biogas productivity and soil fertility. Fermentation technology may help reduce the use of fossil fuels and improve the environment in rural areas. Waste water which was remained after recovering of ethanol and removing the biomass from the fermentation medium had considerable levels of potassium (K), sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) and can be recommended for use in plant irrigation. The present work discusses the background of biomass production and the potentials of some agricultural residues and sweeteners in that aspect, bioethanol production technologies, and evaluation of whole plants vs agro-industrial wastes by using in vitro gas production technique to predict fractions of rumen fermentable organic matter.

Yasmina Mekmouche

Aix-Marseille Universite, France

Title: Gram-scale production of a fungal laccase in the host Aspergillus niger

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Yasmina Mekmouche has completed her Ph.D at the age of 26 years from University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble (France) under the supervision of Pr. Marc Fontecave and Dr. Stéphane Ménage and postdoctoral studies from University of Minnesota with Pr. John D. Lipscomb and from Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination in Toulouse (France) with Pr. Peter Faller. She is a research scientist at CNRS in Marseille since 2004 developing tools for catalysis based on chemical modification of metalloenzymes. She has published 18 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

We report on the heterologous expression in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger of a basidiomycetous laccase gene we routinely use as a mutagenesis platform to produce variants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yield of recombinant laccase (LAC3 from Trametes sp C30) produced in A. niger is over 2 orders of magnitude higher than the best production of the same enzyme previously obtained in S. cerevisiae allowing us to routinely produce up to 840 mg/L of enzyme per culture in bioreactor and purify easily grams of recombinant laccase. The form produced in A. niger (Mw = 84 kDa) differs from that produced in S. cerevisiae (Mw = 94 kDa) in the extent of glycosylation (deglycosylated forms ≈ 60 kDa) and their apparent kinetic parameters whereas their spectroscopic signatures (UV-Visible, Electron Spin Resonance and circular dichroism) are substantially similar. This highlights the potential of using the LAC3 encoding sequence as a generic mutational platform in combination to the S. cerevisiae and A. niger expression systems for large productions of laccases variants.

Break: Coffee Break 16:10 PM-16:25 PM @ Grand Ball Room Foyer
  • Poster Presentation
Location: Grand EFG