Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International conference and exhibition on Food Processing & Technology Kansas City, USA.

Day 1 :

  • Track 1: Nutrition, Food Processing & Food Management Track 3: Food Preservation and Quality Control Track 6: Food Processing Industries
Location: Grand ABC
Speaker

Chair

Dike O. Ukuku

USDA ARS-Eastern Regional Research Center
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ofero A. Caparino

PhilMech
Philippines

Session Introduction

Fahad Mohammed Bin Jasass

King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Saudi Arabia

Title: New product development of canned kidney beans added with fruit dates and evaluate the product in terms of nutrient and sensory evaluation

Time : 10:15-10:35

Speaker
Biography:

Fahad M. Bin jasass is an associate Professor at King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Our objectives were to develop a new canned date-light red kidney beans product and evaluate its antioxidant, physical, and sensory quality. Light red kidney beans (LRKB) were canned using a standard thermal process with 0 (control), 10, 20, and 30% added dates. The date addition resulted in significantly higher contents of both total phenolics and antioxidants of canned product. Phenolic profile indicated that light red kidney beans with 30% added dates had the highest total phenolics (95 mg GAE/100 g). Antioxidant activity in light red kidney beans (LRKB) with 0, 10, 20, and 30% of dates as measured by ATBS was 62.9, 126, 201, and 241 μM TE/g respectively. There were highly positive linear correlations between total phenolics and the levels of added dates and also for the antioxidant activities measured by ATBS, DPPH, FRAP and ORAC assays. Significant differences in hunter color L, a, and b values were observed between control and dates added samples. The sensory attribute scores canned date-light red kidney beans did not differ from control, indicating that adding dates to canned light red kidney beans did not affect the quality negatively.

Speaker
Biography:

Ofero A. Caparino has completed his Ph.D. in Biological and Agricultural Engineering/Food Engineering at Washington State University (WSU), Pullman Campus, under the auspices of the Ford Foundation International Fellowship Program-International Institute of Education, New York, USA, and WSU Graduate Research Assistantship Program. He was a recipient of the British Council Scholarship Program and the Philippines Bureau of Agricultural Research Scholarship Program for his Diploma in Agricultural Education and Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering, respectively. Currently, he is the Chief of the Bioprocess Engineering Division of the Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization (PhilMech), Philippines.

Abstract:

Refractance Window® (RW) drying is a novel drying method that has been proven to produce high quality food powders. However, information on the stability of RW-dried products during long-term storage is lacking. In this study, the effect of packaging atmosphere, storage temperature and time on the physical and chemical stability of RW-dried mango powder was evaluated over 12 months. RW-dried mango powder with a water content of 0.037±0.001 kg water/kg dry solids was stored at 5, 22 and 45ºC for 12 months using air-filled or nitrogen-flushed packaging. Headspace in the package, water content, color, ascorbic acid, β-carotene and microstructures of powder were measured at 0, 6 and 12 months. The mango powder stored at 45ºC suffered discoloration and ascorbic acid (AA) and β-carotene degradation after 6 and 12 months of storage in both air-filled packaging and nitrogen-flushed packaging. The powder stored at 5 and 22ºC had lower nutrient losses and color was retained. Replacing the air inside the package with nitrogen gas was effective in preserving AA in mango powder stored at 5 and 22ºC. Nitrogen flushing also reduced the loss of β-carotene after 6 months of storage. The initial microstructure of mango powder stored at 5 and 22ºC was preserved after 6 and 12 months. Nitrogen-flushed packaging of mango powder at 5 & 22ºC stored for 6 months is recommended in this study to minimize degradation of nutrients during long term storage.

Break: Coffee Break 10:55-11:10 @ Grand Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Kehinde A. Taiwo holds a B.Sc. Degree in Food Science and Technology (FST) and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Agricultural Engineering both from Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU) Ile-Ife, Nigeria. She is the Head of Department of FST. Her research interests are in the areas of post harvest processing of agricultural materials, gender studies involving issues on technology adoption and management by female food processors at the rural level, and Science and Technology Policy Management issues. She has over 60 research publications in international journals of repute and is a Fellow of the Nigerian Society of Engineers.

Abstract:

Fresh cassava tubers of the bitter variety (Manihot esculenta Crantz.) were processed into dried chips (sun and oven drying at 50 and 70ºC). The proximate composition, physic-chemical properties, cyanide content and water absorption capacity of the chips were determined. The chips were milled and soaked in four day old liquor (4DOL) for 3 or 4 days, and pressed for 3 or 2 days, respectively. The pressed mash was sieved, fried, cooled and packaged. The pH and titratable acidity (TTA) of the soaking medium was determined at 24 h interval during soaking of chips. Gari samples from dried chips and gari from fresh tubers (control sample) were analyzed for yield. The results showed that moisture content (10.24) of chips dried at 70ºC was significantly (p<0.05) lower than that of sun dried and 50ºC oven dried chips. The ash (1.53-2.06%), protein (1.30-2.56%), crude fat (1.34-1.47%), crude fibre (2.58-2.72%) and carbohydrate (79.21-82.08%) contents were not significantly (p<0.05) different among the samples. The cyanide content of the chips ranged between 58.26-69.83 mg/100 g, sun dried chips had the least cyanide content. Water absorption capacity (28.21- 98.81%) of chips increased with time with chips dried at 50ºC having the highest value after 6 h of soaking. The pH (4.65-3.90) of the fermenting medium (4DOL) decreased while the TTA (0.09-0.68) increased during fermentation. The yields of gari increased with soaking time and the values (71-78%) obtained were comparable to those in literature.

Speaker
Biography:

Fahad Y. Al-Juhaimi is a renowned food technologist in Saudi Arabia, he earned his MS (1996) and Ph.D. (2001) degrees in 2001 from University of Leeds, UK. Currently he is Chairman for the department of Food Science & Nutrition in King Saud University. He has previously held various positions of including Dean of Riyadh Technology College. He is an active researcher in area of food technology and has published significant research papers. His research interests also include modified atmosphere packaging, innovative food processing, functional foods etc.

Abstract:

Citrus fruit is very popular in many parts of the world due to its distinctive flavor, taste, and aroma as well as multiple health benefits associated with it. The consumption of citrus fruits or their products is believed to have beneficial effects against different diseases, the main reason being the presence of important bioactive compounds. Juice and pulp from Eureka lemon (Citrus limon), Kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata) and Orlando orange (Citrus sinensis) fruits cultivated in Saudi Arabia were analyzed for total phenolics, ascorbic acid and antiradical activities. Juices from lemon, mandarin and orange had 79.21, 91.18 and 107.37 mg GAE/100mL total phenolics; 31.24, 53.15 and 53.24 mg/100mL ascorbic acid and 48.3, 59.19 and 61.35% DPPH radical scavenging activities, respectively. Pulp left after juice extraction from lemon, mandarin and orange shown 98.38, 104.98 and 123.02 mg GAE/100mL total phenolics; 38.52, 57.63 and 61.38 mg/100mL ascorbic acid and 59.6, 62.82 and 69.31 % DPPH radical scavenging activities, respectively. The results show that juice and pulp from locally grown citrus fruits is of good quality and a valuable source of health promoting constituents. Citrus pulp which is usually wasted after juice preparation might be utilized as valuable source of bioactives for development of nutraceutical and functional foods.

Speaker
Biography:

Contamination of juices with pathogenic microorganisms has caused numerous illnesses and some fatalities. Several technologies for non-thermal processing have been commercialized including high-hydrostatic pressure. In this study, the impact of heat and pressure treatment on bacterial cell surface structure leading to injury and inactivation was investigated. Escherichia coli O157H:H7 bacteria was inoculated in apple juice to a final 7.8 log10 CFU/ml. Bacteria inoculated apple juice was thermally treated with thermal death Time (TDT) disks at 25, 35, 45, 50, 55 and 60oC for 4 min or pressurized at 350, 400 and 450 MPa at 25, 35, 45, 50, 55 and 60oC for 20 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterized differences between treated and untreated bacterial cell surface structures. Injury and leakage of intracellular- bacterial substances including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and UV-materials as a function of membrane damage were investigated. Thermal treatment at 55oC and above and 350 MPa pressure and above led to injury. SEM observation of thermal and pressure treated cells showed differences in damaged bacterial cell structures. Leakage of intracellular UV-materials and ATP of thermal injured cells were lower than the values determined from pressurized cells. Similarly, recovery of thermal injured cells occurred faster than pressurized cells during storage of treated samples at 22oC. Bacterial cells in pressurized apple juice stored at 5oC did not recover suggesting that immediate storage after pressure treatment at 5oC will enhance the microbial safety of the apple juice.

Abstract:

Contamination of juices with pathogenic microorganisms has caused numerous illnesses and some fatalities. Several technologies for non-thermal processing have been commercialized including high-hydrostatic pressure. In this study, the impact of heat and pressure treatment on bacterial cell surface structure leading to injury and inactivation was investigated. Escherichia coli O157H:H7 bacteria was inoculated in apple juice to a final 7.8 log10 CFU/ml. Bacteria inoculated apple juice was thermally treated with thermal death Time (TDT) disks at 25, 35, 45, 50, 55 and 60oC for 4 min or pressurized at 350, 400 and 450 MPa at 25, 35, 45, 50, 55 and 60oC for 20 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterized differences between treated and untreated bacterial cell surface structures. Injury and leakage of intracellular- bacterial substances including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and UV-materials as a function of membrane damage were investigated. Thermal treatment at 55oC and above and 350 MPa pressure and above led to injury. SEM observation of thermal and pressure treated cells showed differences in damaged bacterial cell structures. Leakage of intracellular UV-materials and ATP of thermal injured cells were lower than the values determined from pressurized cells. Similarly, recovery of thermal injured cells occurred faster than pressurized cells during storage of treated samples at 22oC. Bacterial cells in pressurized apple juice stored at 5oC did not recover suggesting that immediate storage after pressure treatment at 5oC will enhance the microbial safety of the apple juice.

Break: Lunch Break 12:50 PM-13:35 PM @ Grand EFG
  • Track 1: Art of Fermentation
    Track 3: Fermentation Aspects of New Product Development
    Track 11: Optimizing Cell Culture Process
    Track 12: 3D Cell Culture
Location: Grand ABC
Speaker

Chair

Franco Baldi

CA Foscari University, Italy

Speaker

Co-Chair

Prafull Ranadive

Piramal Enterprises Ltd., India

Session Introduction

Ulrich Stottmeister

University of Leipzig, Germany

Title: Microbiologically produced organic acids as new building blocks in organic synthesis

Time : 13:35-13:55

Speaker
Biography:

Ulrich Stottmeister studied chemistry at the University of Leipzig-Germany (since 1959, PhD:1968, Dr. sc. nat .: 1986, Dr. habil.: 1991). He was lecturer at the University of Leipzig for biotechnology and working as assistant professor at the University of Waterloo, Canada in 1991. Since 1992 he has built up the research group for “Remediation Research” in the new founded UFZ Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig as department head. In 1995 he was appointed to the rank of a full professor for biotechnology and technical chemistry of the University of Leipzig. Ulrich Stottmeister is full member of the Saxony Academy of Sciences since 1996 and full member of acatech, the National German Academy of Technical Sciences since 2002. He was Vice-president and president of ISEB International Society of Environmental Biotechnology from 2004 to 2008. His general fields are Environmental Biotechnology and “White” Biotechnology. He is author, co-author and editor of a wide number of publications, contribution to monographs and books and holds several patents. Ulrich Stottmeister is retired and in guest-status of the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research UFZ.

Abstract:

This review by a group of microbiologists, biotechnologists and chemists is focussed on the biotechnological production of selected oxo- and hydroxycarboxylic acids. The use of these acids as new building blocks can fulfil an impressive range of tasks in organic synthesis. In the first part, the biotechnological aim describes the development of process fundamentals with regard to: - The use of different strains and mutants of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica as a “producer on demand” of metabolites in the TCA cycle (e.g. (2R,3S)-isocitric, 2-oxoglutaric acid) - The variable use of renewable raw materials (plant oils, carbohydrates, industrial by-products such as glycerol) - The development of a “multi-purpose” bioreactor and the application of pilot plant “standard equipment” for organic acid production to minimize the engineering work required - The development of new product isolation procedures, with the aim of direct product recovery and direct capture of products. In case of 2-oxo-gluconic acid formation from glucose, effective transformation reactions based on the bacteria Gluconobacter sp. were carried out using the same equipment. In the second part, the chemical aim describes the impressive synthetic potential of 2-oxo-glutaric acid and 2-oxo-gluconic acid as new building blocks. Our group has introduced and described for the first time new tools for the synthesis of a variety of: - Hydrophilic triazines - Spiro-connected heterocycles - Benzotriazines - Pyranoic amino acids Many of these substances are of great interest for technical and pharmaceutical applications. The basic structure of the compounds is described in further detail. Our recent work has focussed on the chiral (2R,3S)-isocitric acid, another intermediate of the TCA cycle. We have developed a new isolation/purification procedure based on a mutant strain of Y. lipolytica and plant oils as sole carbon source. For the first time, this process provides large quantities of enantiopure trimethyl (2R,3S)-isocitrate, which can then be used in subsequent chemical transformations for promising, completely new chiral entities in the active fields of total synthesis and pharmaceutical research.

Motoharu Uchida

National research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea, Fisheries Research Agency, Japan

Title: Development of a seaweed sauce by fermentation

Time : 13:55-14:15

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Prafull Ranadive has done his masters degree in Microbiology from University of Mumbai and PhD in Biotechnology from VIT University in India. He is holding a post of Group Leader in Natural Products Department (Fermentation Technology Group) of Piramal Enterprises Ltd., Life Science division, a premier drug discovery research organization in India. He has around six publications and two patents on his name. He has given presentations on Bioprocess related subjects in national and international conferences. He has more than 20 years of experience in the field of Fermentation Technology, Strain improvement, Industrial Microbiology, Microbial strain isolation and characterization, Bio-processing and New Drug Discovery. He has handled more than 13 commercial technologies on fermentation process and scaled up to pilot and production scale. In discovery segment, he has handled several scale-up projects and established large scale process for mainly two new antibiotics.

Abstract:

Microbes are prolific sources of novel secondary metabolites with a range of biological activities that may ultimately find application as anti-infective, anti-cancer agents or other pharmaceutically useful compounds. Hence many drug discovery companies are engaged in isolation of novel bioactive metabolites from these microbial sources. Till date, numerous metabolites from these sources have been identified and few of them are undergoing developmental process through pre-clinical or clinical stages or have been launched in the market. Many of such new secondary metabolites are produced using microbial fermentation process rather than chemical synthesis because the fermentations are economically competitive and produce biologically active isomers. To carry out further drug development work including pre-clinical and clinical trials, sufficient quantities of these compounds are needed. For this purpose, the processes are usually scaled up from flask to pilot scale fermenter level. The scale up process is very challenging as the conditions followed during shake flask or lab fermentation may not suit for high volume cultivation. The recovery of the product is also a difficult job and needs lots of efforts to arrive at the right process conditions. Also, at the initial stages of discovery, the microbial strains (wild type) generally have very low production yields of the desired novel metabolites when cultivated in flasks or laboratory fermenter. In order to make the scale up process cost effective, the strains need to be improved to achieve several fold improvement in titers. This presentation will describe the challenges faced during fermentation scale-up process for production of new chemical entities with reference to some case studies. A successful process would lead to commercialization of newly discovered molecule in future.

Speaker
Biography:

Felix Lenk has completed his Master of Science in the field of Automation and Control in 2009 from Dresden University of Technology, Germany and from the University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada. In 2010 he started his PhD at the Dresden University of Technology at the chair of Bioprocess Engineering in the ESF-funded group “White Biotechnology with plant cells”. He was awarded with the InterLabTec-Award in 2011 and as of now has published several research articles in the field of plant in vitro tissue culturing and modeling.

Abstract:

Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Chair of Bioprocess Engineering, Dresden 01062, Germany Secondary metabolites produced by plant in vitro cultures such as Betalains (red-dye in beetroot), the α-Tocopherol (Vitamine E) in sunflowers or Oleanolic and Ursolic acid found in sage are nowadays a main research focus within the branch of White Biotechnology. Cells genetically altered using Agrobacterium rhizogenes form hairy roots which can be cultivated in hormone free media in modern bioreactors [1]. To improve the cultivation process (higher yield, shorter cultivation time) and the bioreactor design (bubble column vs. stirred) a structured growth model with consequent simulations and visualization is presented as until now no theoretical description of the growth processes exist. The determination of relevant parameters such as the number of branching points or specific segment length is carried out using an automatic image recognition software for pictures taken from the hairy root tissue networks on agar plates. With the presented innovative customized solution it is possible to quantitatively track a morphological growth process over the cultivation period [2]. The author presents a structured, object oriented growth model implemented as a finite state machine and calibrated with experimental imaging recognition data of the cultivations of Beta vulgaris. Results of the numerical simulations are displayed with a 3D-visualization engine and compared with experimental data. Additionally an Infors Multifors standard stirred tank reactor (STR) has been modified with a membrane-plate to culture Beta vulgaris and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) hairy roots successfully. With the modifications and six times higher biomass yield could be observed with a novel, patented biomonitoring method for inhomogeneous cultures.

Speaker
Biography:

Franco Baldi has completed his study at University of Siena (Italy) at the age of 24 years became Researcher in 1981 at the same University. He was a recipient of several fellowships in England, France, and United states. In 1998, through a national competition FB became Associate Professor and in 2005 won the full professorship of General Microbiology at Cà Foscari University, Venice, Italy. He has published more than 100 papers of which 74 are by Scopus retrieved. The scientific interest is on microbial degradation of pollutants and in particular on microbes-metals interactions and their potential biotechnological applications.

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

At Piramal Enterprises Ltd, Dr.Girish Mahajan-(Ph.D) is spearheading a team of Scientists involved in exploring Actinomycetes and Myxobacteria from extreme resources to acquire novel bioactive leads. His core expertise is in discovery & developing the microbial derived drugs by unique ways of fermentation of wild strain isolates. He has inherited enriched experience from Uni-Lever, Hoechst, Johnson & Johnson. He is a contributive member, mentor of ASM & AMI, member of board of studies of reputed universities in India. He has published 54 international papers, 10 patents & guided 25 postgraduates. Couple of his compounds are in preclinical development. He has received several national awards and recently; “OPPI Scientist Award-2012” by Organisation of Pharmaceutical Producers of India.

Abstract:

Myxobacteria do not biosynthesize a single natural product belonging to a structural type, but often an array of closely-related metabolites. At least 30 different epothilone variants have been reported from extracts of the epothilone producing Sorangium strain. Additionally, myxobacteria often produce numerous, structurally distinct secondary metabolites simultaneously. Nevertheless a majority of such new scaffolds synthesized by myxobacteria are in very dilute amount, which restricts their detectability and isolation. A way to overcome this limitation is by use of adsorbing resins in fermentation media which allows concentration of such active and rare metabolites. However use of such resins at fermentor level creates some practical difficulties. During our in-house isolation and screening strategy of myxobacteria for getting novel anti-inflammatory compounds, we optimized use of AMBERLITE™ XAD™1180N resin (a non-ionic, hydrophobic, macroreticular crosslinked polymeric adsorbent) during fermentation at shake-flask’s levels. The resin was eluted using methanol. The metabolites in the eluates were screened and characterised. By using this polymer based fermentation process two novel anti-inflammatory compounds were discovered from the in-house myxobacteria strain PM0670013-(MTCC 5570). The two compounds were with molecular formula C13H21NO4 and C13H28N2O2; their respective molecular weights as 255.15 and 244.36 daltons. Both displayed significant activity against pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor - _ (TNF-_) and Interleukins such as IL-6. Aerobic fermentation scale-up (20 L) for this strain was optimized so as to produce the same two metabolites in significant amounts in absence of the resin. The spin off in the bioprocess to produce the same novel scaffolds will be presented.

Break: Coffee Break 15:35 PM-15:50 PM @ Grand Ball Room Foyer
  • Workshop on Development of speciality foods, current problems & searching for Corrections by Annette C. Bentley , American Celiac Society, USA
Location: Grand ABC