Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Clinical & Experimental Cardiology Hilton Chicago/Northbrook, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Work Shop

Session Introduction

Jozsef P Vas

Hungarian Association of Hypnosis, Hungary

Title: Tandem Hypnotherapy (THT) as a new method functionedat sensori-motor level
Speaker
Biography:

Jozsef P. Vas is a Professor at Hungarian Association of Hypnosis, Hungary.

Abstract:

Tandem Hypnotherapy (THT) designates a group of hypnotic methods which can be eff ectively applied in psychosomatic and mental disorders stemming from early relational traumas. “Tandem” here mean more three people, including the therapist. ‘TANDEM’ herealso means Touch of Ancient and New generations with a Dialogue Experiencing oneness of Minds. Th e techniques of THT have been elaborated by the authors. All the techniques of TH involve more than two persons in the setting, with whom the therapists make an agreement as to undertake hypnosis with the aim of reliving an imagined communication. In the therapeutic setting, touch plays a central role as this can help to resolve the psychopathological outcomes of early relational traumas, because it works at the sensory motor level of perception. Th e lecture presents case studies together with some conceptual issues raised by their analysis. Multi-personal trance, developing in the context of physical closeness, has been found to have the capacity to create an experience of oneness, and a consciousness of oneness, which can have the power to resolve pathological psychological splits, which can have a major role in the genesis of psychosomatic, such us some cardiologic diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Csaszar Noemi Ph.D., ECP, is the Head of the Education Board of the Hungarian Association of Hypnosis (H.A.H), clinical psychologist, supervisor hypnotherapist, psychotherapist, Head of Psychotherapy Department and Psychosomatic Out-Patient Department at the National Center for Spinal Disorders in Budapest. She is the author of the special issue chapter: Csaszar N., Ganju A., Mirnics Zs., Varga P.P.: Psychosocial Issues In The Cancer Patient.

Abstract:

Tandem Hypnotherapy (THT) designates a group of hypnotic methods which can be eff ectively applied in psychosomatic and mental disorders stemming from early relational traumas. “Tandem” here mean more three people, including the therapist. ‘TANDEM’ herealso means Touch of Ancient and New generations with a Dialogue Experiencing oneness of Minds. Th e techniques of THT have been elaborated by the authors. All the techniques of TH involve more than two persons in the setting, with whom the therapists make an agreement as to undertake hypnosis with the aim of reliving an imagined communication. In the therapeutic setting, touch plays a central role as this can help to resolve the psychopathological outcomes of early relational traumas, because it works at the sensory motor level of perception. Th e lecture presents case studies together with some conceptual issues raised by their analysis. Multi-personal trance, developing in the context of physical closeness, has been found to have the capacity to create an experience of oneness, and a consciousness of oneness, which can have the power to resolve pathological psychological splits, which can have a major role in the genesis of psychosomatic, such us some cardiologic diseases.

  • Track 3: Cardiac Therapeutic Agents
Location: Willow
Speaker

Chair

Samuel C. Dudley

University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Anthony W. Ashton

University of Sydney, Australia

Session Introduction

Samuel C Dudley

University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Title: Novel biomarkers for diastolic heart failure

Time : 09:30-09:50

Speaker
Biography:

Dudley completed his MD and Ph.D. at the age of 26 years from the Medical College of Virginia. Dudley is a Professor of Medicine and Physiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Currently, he is an Editorial Board Member for JACC and a member of the Association of University Cardiologists and the American Society for Clinical Investigation. His research program focuses on mechanisms and treatments of arrhythmia and diastolic heart failure. He has published more than 80 articles and chapters and has submitted more than 15 patent applications on new therapeutics in these areas.

Abstract:

Diastolic heart failure (DHF) is increasing in prevalence and incidence, but there are no specifi c treatments or diagnostic biomarkers known. Recently, we reported that that impaired relaxation is associated with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling that results in oxidative modifi cation of cardiac myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C), induces slowed myofi lament cross-bridge kinetics, and leads to diastolic dysfunction. NOS uncoupling is enhanced by asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Plasma ADMA, L-arginine, and symmetric dimethyl arginine (SDMA) levels were determined from human plasma samples from patients with DHF or systolic HF (SHF) and from a healthy control group. Plasma ADMA level were elevated in both DHF patients (0.77 ± 0.04 μM, P<0.05) and SHF patients (0.68 ± 0.03 μM, P<0.05) compared to control group (0.57 ± 0.02 μM). Th e ratio of L-arginine/ADMA was signifi cantly reduced in the DHF group (139.5 ± 9.5, P<0.05) but not in the SHF group. Acute and chronic patients with DHF showed elevated plasma ADMA levels (0.71 ± 0.03 μM, P<0.05, Acute; 0.74 ± 0.03 μM, P<0.05, Chronic) compared to control, but there was no diff erence based on the acutely of the illness. Human plasma from DHF patients showed elevated MyBP-C and S-total glutathionylated MyBP-C fragments compared to healthy control group (4.2 ± 1.4- fold, N=12, P<0.05). Elevated plasma ADMA level, the ratio of L-arginine/ADMA, and cardiac-specifi c S-glutathionylation of MyBP-C may be a useful biomarkers of DHF.

Speaker
Biography:

Antonio Ferrari earned an MD at the University of Pavia in 1990 and specialized in Cardiology at the University of Pavia. He served at Policlinico San Matteo in Cardiology dept for 14 years where he performed Clinical Cardiology, EPs Studies, cardiac angiography, clinical research in particular in Arrhythmology. From 2009, he is Corporate Cardiac Leader and Head of International Medical Unit in Chiesi Farmaceutici.

Abstract:

Ventricular Arrhythmias (VA) may be recorded in Phase 1 clinical trials, and although not common fi ndings, the increase in ECG monitoring time in Healthy Volunteers (HV) may be associated with more frequent reports of asymptomatic VA. In particular, occurrence of Non-Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia (NSVT) can raise Cardiac Safety concerns in a development program. Methods: Th e primary objective of the single centre clinical trial was to assess the safety and tolerability of single (SAD, seven dose levels) and repeated (MAD, fi ve dose levels for seven days) ascending doses of a compound compared to placebo when administered to male HVs. Th e study designs were crossover in SAD part and parallel group in MAD part. In SAD, two out of the ten subjects in each of the two dose cohorts received placebo, in MAD placebo was administered in three out of the twelve subjects. Th e Holter schedule (12-lead digital) was the following: in SAD part, two consecutive Holters, on Days -1 and 1 for each dose and in MAD, fi ve Holters on Days -1, 1, 3, 6 and 7. Th ere were two Holters for each subject in off -drug conditions, one at screening and one at Day -1. VA occurrence time was compared to individual maximum drug concentrations (Cmax). Results: Th e present report only focuses on NSVT runs, defi ned as at least three consecutive beats of ventricular origin, excluding isolated and couplets of VA. A total of 124 volunteers were screened, and NSVT were observed at screening in fi ve Holter recordings out of 124 (four subjects not randomized and one subject randomized). Twenty volunteers were divided into two cohorts and randomized to SAD part and NSVT were observed in two subjects. Fift y-four subjects were randomized to MAD part, divided into three cohorts, and in three subjects NSVTs were recorded. Th e total number of subjects showing at least one NSVT was 10 out of 124 total screened, randomized or non-randomized. In six subjects out of 10, the NSVT were observed in off -drug periods (screening or before dosing). In the other four subjects the arrhythmias were observed far from drug Cmax. Conclusions: Th e occurrence of ventricular runs was low and in line with that reported in the literature (10 out of 124). Ventricular runs in these HVs were consistently short and monomorphic, with a predominant left bundle branch block pattern, with a long coupling interval of the fi rst ventricular beats. Th e use of both systematic screening Holter and additional 24-hour recordings before dosing allows the determination of the “background frequency” of such episodes in off -drug conditions and so permits a more robust evaluation of drug eff ects.

Speaker
Biography:

Kassiri completed her graduate training at University of Toronto in muscle physiology (MSc), electrophysiology and gene therapy (Ph.D.), followed by a post-doctoral training in matrix biology and remodeling in cardiovascular diseases at Ontario Cancer Institute (Toronto). She joined University of Alberta in August 2007 as an independent Investigator, where she currently is an Associate Professor at the Department of Physiology and a member of the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute and Cardiovascular Research Centre (CVRC). Her research investigates the role of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in cardiac and vascular pathologies. Her research has been supported by an Establishment Grant from Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions (AI-HS), and operating grants from Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) and Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada (HSF).

Abstract:

Aortic aneurysm is dilation of the aorta primarily due to degradation of the aortic wall extracellular matrix (ECM). Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibit MMPs, the proteases that degrade the ECM. TIMP3 is the only ECM-bound TIMP and its levels are altered in the aorta from patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We investigated the causal role of TIMP3 in AAA formation. Infusion of Angiotensin II (Ang II), using micro-osmotic (Alzet) pumps, in TIMP3-/- male mice, but not in wild type control mice, led to adverse remodeling of the abdominal aorta, reduced collagen and elastin proteins but not mRNA, and elevated proteolytic activities suggesting excess protein degradation within 2 weeks that led to formation of AAA by 4 weeks. Intriguingly, despite early upregulation of MMP2 in TIMP3-/-AngII aortas, additional deletion of MMP2 in these mice (TIMP3-/-/MMP2-/-) resulted in exacerbated AAA, compromised survival due to aortic rupture, and infl ammation in the abdominal aorta. Reconstitution of WT bone marrow in TIMP3-/-/MMP2-/- mice reduced infl ammation and prevented AAA in these animals following Ang II infusion. Treatment with a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor (PD166793) prevented the Ang II-induced AAA in TIMP3-/- and in TIMP3-/-/MMP2-/- mice. Our study demonstrates that the regulatory function of TIMP3 is critical in preventing adverse vascular remodeling and AAA. Hence, replenishing TIMP3, a physiological inhibitor of a number of metalloproteinases, could serve as a therapeutic approach in limiting AAA development or expansion.

Speaker
Biography:

Pollen Yeung completed his Ph.D. at the age of 30 years from University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, SK, Canada) and is currently Professor of Pharmacy and Medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS, Canada. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member for Recent Review of Clinical Trials, Drug Metabolism Open Journal, Medical Sciences Monitor, Metabolites, Cardiovascular Pharmacology Open Access, and Natural Products Chemistry and Research Open Access.

Abstract:

Although clinical drug development has made signifi cant stride along with pharmaceutical sciences over the last 3 decades, from the application of pharmacokinetics in the 1970’s, controlled clinical studies for effi cacy in 1980’s, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics in the 1990s, to a focus on drug safety in the past decade, the success rate to introduce new eff ective and safe therapeutic agents has not kept up with expectations from the fi nancial investment and those of patients. In another word, there is inadequate improvement in drug therapy or fi nancial reward. Identifi cation and application of biomarkers for lead selection and optimization has been heralded as one of the most likely scientifi c approach to increase the success of drug development. It is widely conceived that biomarkers are the scientifi c basis and eff ective tools for disease management and personalized medicine. Th e presentation will focus on the potential of using ATP metabolism as biomarker target for cardiovascular protection and toxicities, and regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis. It will also discuss the opportunities, challenges and obstacles of exploiting ATP metabolism as targets for drug development and personalized medicine, and how government regulatory and funding agencies may expedite to advance the course of biomarker discovery and development.

Break: Coffee Break 10:50-11:05 @ Pine
Speaker
Biography:

G Chandramohan has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 28 years from Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India and now he is working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. During his doctoral program, he has isolated a novel antidiabetic compound from the south Indian medicinal plant and he has patented his invention and patent was granted recently by IPR, India (Patent Grant No. 243139). Senior Research Fellowship and University Research Studentship have been awarded for his doctoral research by Indian Council of Medical Research and Annamalai University respectively. G Chandramohan is very active in participation in scientifi c meeting in abroad. He has also served as a Session Chair Person and organizing committee member for the 1st International Conference on Diabetes & Metabolism held in California, USA (2010) and 2nd World Congress on Diabetes & Metabolism held in Philadelphia, USA (2011). He has published a good number of papers in reputed journals. He is serving as an editorial board member and reviewer in reputed journals. He is also evaluator for the Indian government scientifi c projects. Recently, he has completed two major research projects on "Role of camel milk in diabetes mellitus & Morin, a fl avonoid on myocardial infarction".

Abstract:

The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the preventive role of morin, a fl avonoid, on cardiac marker enzymes such as aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB, membrane-bound enzymes such as sodium potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase, calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase and magnesiumdependent adenosine triphosphatase, and glycoproteins such as hexose, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with morin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) daily for a period of 30 days. Aft er the treatment period, ISO (85 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected into the rats at an interval of 24 h for 2 days. ISO-induced rats showed signifi cantly (P<0.05) increased activities of cardiac marker enzymes in serum and decreased activities in the heart, and increased activities of calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase and magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase in the heart, and the activity of sodium potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase decreased in the heart. ISO induction also showed a signifi cant increase in the levels of glycoproteins in serum and the heart. Pretreatment with morin (40 mg/kg) daily for a period of 30 days exhibited signifi cant (P<0.05) eff ects and altered these biochemical parameters positively compared to the other two doses. Th us, our study shows that morin has a protective role in ISO-induced MI in rats. Th e observed eff ects might be due to the free radical-scavenging, antioxidant and membrane-stabilising properties of morin.

Speaker
Biography:

After obtaining Master degree in Physics (Electronics) and M.Tech (1977) in Electronics and communication Engineering, Hari Raj Singh joined Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee India in 1977as Sr. Research Fellow and completed his Ph.D. research work. In 1980, he joined Council of Scientifi c and Industrial Research India as Sr. Scientist and rose to the position of Sr. Principal Scientist, Head of Biomedical Division and Project Advisor at National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi India. He have about 50 research publications in National and International Journals of repute and conferences. Besides, he was associated with several International journals as Hon. Editorial Board Members and Peer reviewer. He visited several countries and universities for delivering invited lectures and chairing sessions in conferences. Presently he is working as Director, Radha Govind Group of Institutions Meerut, India. His areas of research are Cardio-vascular signal detection, monitoring, analysis and transmission, Cancer nodule detection, Speech synthesis, Bio-medical signal processing, Robotics and its social applications and design and development of aids and appliances for disabled.

Abstract:

Knowledge driven technological developments, the growth and speed of application oriented products in the fi eld of web based services, medical technology and information science, the use of sensor networks for remote patient monitoring is currently playing a major role in quality healthcare delivery to the masses. However, further research need to be done for more eff ective diagnosis and treatment of diseases remotely. An improved web based, knowledge driven, patient data monitoring and diagnosis system remotely, is developed to acquire, store and process the data using specially developed GUI (Graphical User Interface) on lab-view platform. Th e GUI displays, communicates and processes vital biomedical parameters such as Heart rate (HR), beat to beat ratio (R-R), QRS and QT intervals etc aft er acquiring ECG, pulse rate, body temperature etc. from the patient’s body sensors. Th e system detects any emergency condition automatically, if the patient develops any abnormality in his heart rate or irregularity in rhythm heart line and establishes direct connectivity between specialists and patient. Th e provision to store the online data on remote PC in auto mode is given. Th e storage of data fi les on demand on local and remote PC and online data communication between the two is done through shared variables. A case study to evaluate the performance and to verify the experimental implementation is conducted on two patients with varying heart rate (HR) and varying rhythm and the results were found exactly to be in accordance with the expected outcome.

  • Track 4: Biophysics and Systems Biology
Location: Willow
Speaker

Chair

Anastasia Susie Mihailidou

Royal North Shore Hospital & University of Sydney, Australia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Alexander D. Verin

Georgia Regents University, USA

Session Introduction

Alexander D. Verin

Georgia Regents University, USA

Title: Extracellular purines in vascular endothelial barrier preservation

Time : 11:45-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Verin has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 29 from Moscow State University School of Biology and postdoctoral studies from Indiana University School of Medicine. He is Professor of Medicine and Vascular Biology at Georgia Regents University. He has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of American Journal of Physiology and member of NIH and AHA study sections. Currently he is the academic editor of Cardiology and Angiology and editorial board member of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Tissue Barriers and World Journal of Respirology

Abstract:

Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In lung injury the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. Little is known about the processes that determine EC barrier preservation. Recently, attention has been given to the therapeutic potential of purinergic agonists in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Our data indicate that ATP and its degradation product adenosine are able to protect EC barrier in vitro and in vivo. We show that adenosine induces rapid increases in cAMP level and activation of protein kinase A (PKA) /myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase (MLCP) cascade and this correlates with a signifi cant attenuation of endotoxin (LPS)- induced EC permeability. In contrast, we demonstrate that ATP induced PKA/MLCP activation and EC barrier enhancement without increase in cAMP. We also have recently shown the involvement of P2Y receptors coupled to Gi2 or Gq (for ATP) and P1 A2a receptors coupled to Gs (for adenosine) in purine-induced EC barrier enhancement. In addition, our data indicate that the inhibition of phosphatase 1 (such as MLCP) leads to the phosphorylation of several cytoskeletal targets, which correlates with permeability increase suggesting that dephosphorylation of these proteins may be involved in the barrier-enhancing eff ect. Collectively, our data strongly suggest that EC barrier preservation induced by extracellular purines is dependent upon activation of specifi c purinergic receptor/G-protein complexes. Further, purine-induced EC barrier preservation requires the coordinated activation of PKA signaling and MLCP activation leading to EC cytoskeletal changes.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed Chahine has completed his Ph.D. at the University of Poitiers in France. He is the director of the Cellular and Molecular Cardiology Laboratory at Laval University. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals. He has published several major papers on the underlying causes of the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and Paramyotonia Congenital in patients around the world, including some in Canada. Therefore his research is at the leading edge of studies on sodium channelopathies. He has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Cardiac Na+ channels encoded by the SCN5A gene are essential for initiating heart beats and maintaining a regular heart rhythm. Mutations in these channels have recently been associated with atrial fi brillation, ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disorders, and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We investigated a young male patient with a mixed phenotype composed of documented conduction disorder, atrial fl utter, and ventricular tachycardia associated with DCM. Further family screening revealed DCM in the patient’s mother and sister and in three of the mother’s sisters. Because of the complex clinical phenotypes, we screened SCN5A and identifi ed a novel mutation, R219H, which is located on a highly conserved region on the fourth helix of the voltage sensor domain of Nav1.5. Th ree family members with DCM carried the R219H mutation. Th e wild-type (WT) and mutant Na+ channels were expressed in a heterologous expression system, and intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using a pH-sensitive electrode. Th e biophysical characterization of the mutant channel revealed an unexpected selective proton leak with no eff ect on its biophysical properties. Th e H+ leak through the mutated Nav1.5 channel was not related to the Na+ permeation pathway but occurred through an alternative pore, most probably a proton wire on the voltage sensor domain. We propose that acidifi cation of cardiac myocytes and/or downstream events may cause the DCM phenotype and other electrical problems in aff ected family members. Th e identifi cation of this clinically signifi cant H+ leak may lead to the development of more targeted treatments.

Speaker
Biography:

Saverio Gentile has completed his Ph.D. from the Neuroscience Laboratory of the Stazione Zoologica “A. Dohrn” Naples, Italy and Universita’ Degli Studi Della Calabria, Italy. In 2003, he moved to the laboratory of Neurobiology at the from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS/NIH), NC, and USA to study regulation of ion channels activity and later he joined the Cardiology Department at Duke University. He is now Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology at Loyola University Chicago. His research is focusing on hormonal regulation of ion channel activity. He has published several papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Ion channels play a fundamental role in generating and controlling electrical signals and contraction of the heart. Mutations that inhibit or up-regulate ion channels activities can dramatically interfere with normal heart function leading to unpredictable organ failure, and therefore poor quality of life or even death. However, the molecular mechanism linking these mutations to inherited cardiac disiseases still is very elusive. Phosphorylation exerts signifi cant eff ects on the biophysical mechanisms of ion channels ranging from variations in current kinetics to changes in ion channel traffi cking. We found that disease-associated mutations on diff erent ion channels can create or disrupt phosphorylation sites which in turn strongly aff ect ion channel function. We call these events “Ion Channels Phosphorylopathies”. In summary here we show: 1) A mutation on the L-type calcium channel Cav1.2 associated with the cardiac arrhythmia creates a consensus site for CAMKII. Aberrant phosphorylation at this site leads to an abnormal Cav1.2 activity. 2) A frequent mutation of the voltage gated potassium channel hERG1-associated with the Long-QT2 syndrome creates a consensus sites for the specifi c protein kinases PKB. Aberrant phosphorylation at this site aff ects the thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent regulation of on Kv11.1 channel activity. 3) Another distinct Long-QT2-associated mutation on hERG channel disrupts a PKC-dependent phosphorylation. Inhibition of phosphorylation at this PKC site leads to abnormal regulation of Kv11.1 activity. Understanding Phosphorylopathies off ers the opportunity to fi nd a mechanism linking genomic variations to human heart disease and it is crucial in the process of designing an eff ective pharmacological strategy.

Break: Lunch Break 12:45-13:30 @ Pine
Speaker
Biography:

Bogdan Amuzescu, MD (1991), Ph.D. (2003), has over 25 years of experience in biophysics and electrophysiology-patch-clamp. He is currently Associate Professor in the Deparment of Biophysics & Physiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, and co-organizer since 2000 of a NENS-acknowledged master program in neurobiology. He wrote Over 20 original scientifi c papers (9 in ISI-quoted journals), several scientifi c books and book chapters, presentations at over 90 internal/international scientifi c meetings. He took part in successful completion of 8 international and 6 internal research grants. And he is a member of 6 scientifi c societies (e.g. Biophysical Society). Major areas of interest: membrane biophysics, neuronal & cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology, mathematical modeling.

Abstract:

TRPM7 is an ubiquitously expressed ion channel, belonging to the melastatin-related group of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily, putatively involved in intracellular magnesium homeostasis and transport of transitional metal ions (iron, copper, zinc, etc.). Along with TRPM6, present mainly in intestinal and renal epithelia, where it plays an important role in magnesium transport, they form a peculiar category of channel-enzymes, featuring a functional alpha-kinase and phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal domain. Our studies led to the identifi cation in ventricular myocytes of diff erent species of a non-selective channel current with permeation and regulation properties virtually identical to TRPM7 in heterologous expression systems. Th e channel is blocked by trivalent lanthanides, has a particular current-voltage relation, requires ATP and PIP2 for activation, and is inhibited by intracellular magnesium and acidifi cation. Recently we have identifi ed in human atrial myocytes a current with similar permeation, block and regulation properties. In ~1/3 of patients the current was already activated at patch rupture. Our recent immunofl uorescence experiments have confi rmed the presence of TRPM7 in ventricular cardiomyocytes, showing a preferential location at the Z membranes of the sarcomeres and intercalated disks, and also a peri-and paranuclear staining suggestive for the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Although earlier studies have convincingly demonstrated TRPM7 activation by free oxygen radicals during prolonged neuronal ischemia (Aarts et al. 2003 Cell 115:863-877), and an antiapoptotic eff ect of nerve growth factor on hippocampal neurons via downregulation of TRPM7 expression, the relevance of TRPM7 activation during myocardial ischemia is currently not understood.

Peifeng Li

University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Title: Micro RNAs control mitochondrial network in the heart

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Peifeng Li has completed his MD and Ph.D. at the age of 30 years from Chinese Academy of Medical Science and postdoctoral studies from Max- Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine, Germany. He is a Research Assistant Professor at University of Illinois at Chicago. He has published more than 62 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Dataset Papers in Biology.

Abstract:

Mitochondria supply energy for physiological function and they participate in the regulation of other cellular events including apoptosis, calcium homeostasis and production of reactive oxygen species. Th us, mitochondria play a critical role in the cells. However, dysfunction of mitochondria is related to a variety of pathological processes and diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs about 22 nucleotides long, and they can bind to the 3’ un-translated region (3’UTR) of mRNAs, thereby inhibiting mRNA translation or promoting mRNA degradation. Our data show that modulations of miR-499 levels can infl uence apoptosis, myocardial infarction and cardiac remodeling. Both the alpha-and beta-isoforms of calcineurin catalytic subunit are the targets of miR-499. Calcineurin dephosphorylates dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) leading to its accumulation in mitochondria, the activation of the mitochondrial fi ssion program and the consequent apoptosis. miR- 499 can regulate Drp1 phosphorylation status and mitochondrial fi ssion through targeting calcineurin. Finally, p53 is shown to transcriptionally downregulate miR-499 expression. Our data provide novel evidence suggesting that miR-499 is a regulator of mitochondrial fi ssion machinery, and the therapeutic approaches for myocardial infarction can be developed by modulating miR-499.

Fatih Yalcin

Johns Hopkins University, USA

Title: Advanced cardiac imaging techniques in early recognition of heart failure

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Fatih Yalcin, Fulbright Visiting Professor, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, USA. His research interest is on Novel Cardiovascular Imaging, Tissue Doppler Imaging, Live 3 DE, 3rd Generation Microscopic USG, and cardiac MRI. Editorial Board Membership: World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery, Datasets International, Radiology.

Abstract:

Heart failure (HF) is a progressive process and has gradually increased disease since lifetime has been increased worldwidely by developed eff ective medical treatment. Left ventricular remodeling initiated by hypertrophy (LVH) in HF is an adaptive process and early determination of this progressive process may contribute to prevention of adverse outcomes. Plante GE. Predisease biological markers: early diagnosis and prevention of arterial hypertension. Metabolism. 2008;57:S36-39. We recently have detected as the fi rst time prospectively that "Focal hypertrophy of LV septal base is the early imaging biomarker of hypertrophy in physiologic and pathologic stres using microimaging." In this study, ventricular hypertrophy is noted earliest on LV septal base during development of both physiologic and pathologic stress. Heart morphology during LV remodeling due to pressure overload may have regional LV myocardial diff erences. Th e fi ndings by novel cardiac imaging methods supports that LV base regionally may be aff ected by stress induction earlier and may become more severely dysfunctional since relatively greater stress is anticipated compared to the midapical region in disease process. We previously documented “predominant myocardial LV base and diminished regional LV basal cavity volume in LVH” using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography. Yalçin F, Shiota T, Odabashian J, et al. Comparison by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography of LV geometry in HCM versus secondary LVH. Am J Cardiol. 2000;85:1035-1038. Microimaging has become a very important method to image cardiovascular structures. Barisione C, Charnigo R, Howatt DA, et al. Rapid dilation of the abdominal aorta during infusion of angiotensin II detected by noninvasive high-frequency ultrasonography. J Vasc Surg. 2006; 44:372-376. In conclusion, the determination of early imaging biomarker of LVH by “the recognition of regional involvement of LV septal base in progressive remodeling process may contribute to early diagnosis and may prepare a base for further research in this fi eld of HF.”

Break: Coffee Break 15:50-16:05 @ Pine

Vinod Chaubey & Lovely Chhabra

University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA

Title: Electrocardiographic impacts of lung resection

Time : 16:05-16:25

Speaker
Biography:

Chhabra has authored and co-authored two book chapters in Cardiovascular Medicine and over 20 peer-reviewed journal publications of which 16 have been published in several International peer-reviewed scientifi c journals. He has presented his scholarly work at over 20 state, national and international medical society meetings. He has also served on the reviewer boards of several international peer-reviewed medical journals including American Journal of Cardiology, Indian Heart Journal, Hemodialysis International and Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology. His research interests include electrocardiography, pericardial diseases, interatrial conduction blocks and electrocardiographic changes associated with various pulmonary diseases. He is starting his Cardiovascular diseases fellowship training at the University of Connecticut (Hartford Hospital) in July, 2013 and is planning to actively continue his research activities during his future career.Chhabra has authored and co-authored two book chapters in Cardiovascular Medicine and over 20 peer-reviewed journal publications of which 16 have been published in several International peer-reviewed scientifi c journals. He has presented his scholarly work at over 20 state, national and international medical society meetings. He has also served on the reviewer boards of several international peer-reviewed medical journals including American Journal of Cardiology, Indian Heart Journal, Hemodialysis International and Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology. His research interests include electrocardiography, pericardial diseases, interatrial conduction blocks and electrocardiographic changes associated with various pulmonary diseases. He is starting his Cardiovascular diseases fellowship training at the University of Connecticut (Hartford Hospital) in July, 2013 and is planning to actively continue his research activities during his future career.

Abstract:

Introduction: Electrocardiographic (ECG) changes accompanying lung resection have not been well investigated previously in a large controlled series of human adults. Th us, our current investigation was undertaken for a better understanding of the ECG changes associated with lung resection. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 117 patients who underwent lung resection (segmentectomy, lobectomy, or pneumonectomy) were reviewed. Th eir clinical course and ECG’s were compared during early, intermediate and late postoperative course (<1 month, 1 month to 1 year and >1 year post-op respectively). Results: Patients in the acute postoperative phase had higher heart rate, increased maximum P-duration and P-dispersion, increased incidence of atrial arrhythmias and frequent ST-T changes. P-vector and QRS-vector were signifi cantly aff ected aft er the lung resections; the correlation being most consistent between the anatomical displacements and the QRS-vector in the majority of patients. Th e frontal QRS vector displacements were statistically signifi cant aft er pneumonectomies and demonstrated a characteristic temporal relationship aft er left pneumonectomy (a left ward deviation in the acute, normal or slight rightward deviation in the intermediate and a rightward deviation in the late postoperative course) [p<0.0003]. Precordial R-wave transition was oft en delayed in patients with the left lung resections where the fi ndings simulated as an acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction; however the R/S transition oft en occurred early in the patients who underwent right sided lung resections [p<0.0001]. Conclusion: Th e understanding and recognition of the expected ECG fi ndings aft er lung resection is imperative to avoid confusing these changes with other acute cardiopulmonary events which would prevent unnecessary further investigational work-up. Th ese ECG changes are oft en dynamic and may bear a temporal relationship to the dynamic post-surgical changes in the thoracic anatomy.

Edward Rojas

University of Zulia, Venezuela

Title: Targeting hypertension in patients with cardiorenal metabolic syndrome

Time : 16:45-17:05

Speaker
Biography:

Edward Rojas has completed his Medical Degree at the age of 23 years from Zulia University and is currently enrolled in an advanced Endocrinology Masters degree from the University of Alcala de Henares. As such short age he was a co-founder of the Latin-American Society of Cardiometabolic Syndrome, Vice-President of the Zulian Chapter of the Interamerican Society of Diabetes and participated in as secretary in the organization of several congresses. 17 published manuscripts and researcher at the Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center.

Abstract:

Diabetes mellitus coexisting with hypertension is greater than chance alone would predict. Hypertensive patients have been shown to have altered composition of skeletal muscle tissue, decreased blood fl ow to skeletal muscle and post-receptor signaling alterations in the IRS insulin pathway, all inducing insulin resistance states, which partially explains why blood pressure goals in DM patients are lower than in normoglycemic patients. Although optimal fi rst-step antihypertensive drug therapy in type 2 DM or impaired fasting glucose levels (IFG) should be individualized for each patient, converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI’s) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB’s) have been demonstrated in some but not all studies to decrease the rate of development of proteinuria and diabetic renal disease. According to the ACCF/AHA 2011 Expert Consensus, elderly persons with diabetes, hypertension, and nephropathy should be initially treated with ACEIs or ARBs, although the choice of a specifi c antihypertensive may also depend on other associated comorbidities.

Speaker
Biography:

Murad Al-Salamat is a Pharm D. at Jordan University of Science and Technology/King Abdullah University Hospital. He has received a royal award for his bachelors with various awards and funds for his researches and projects from different organization, such as King Abdullah II Fund and Development (KAFD). He has worked in Jordan Hospital as clinical pharmacist and then at the Princesses Haya Biotechnology Center (PHBC) on signal transduction and molecular genetics. He has also worked with a research team in the Pharmaceutics Research Unit (PRU). Murad has participated in several local, regional, and international conferences, as well as having publications on signal transduction, and molecular pharmacology.

Abstract:

An essential step in atherosclerosis progression is the infi ltration of monocytes to the sub-endothelial space of arteries where they diff erentiate into M1 phenotype (the classical pathway) or M2 phenotype (the alternative pathway), where polarization depends mainly on the environmental cytokines. Macrophages play an imperative role in foam cell formation that ends up with plaque rapture and thrombosis, which are all mediated by secreted infl ammatory factors, proteolytic enzymes, and other factors produced mainly by M1 phenotype. M2 or known as the Anti-infl ammatory pathway driven by IL-4, and IL-13; shows great ability to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. However, IL-4 displays pro-atherogenic action that may account for its eff ects on the endothelial cells by increasing the expression of P-selectin, 15-lipoxygenase, VCAM-1, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). We have designed small synthetic molecules that mimic IL-4, where it binds to IL-4Rα specifi cally to induce M2 macrophage polarization and M1 transformation into M2, meanwhile with minimal active endothelial and vascular smooth muscle IL-4Rα. We rely on a series of amino-acids to induce this expected activation on the macrophage, and on lipophilicity as well to enhance the targeting macrophage IL-4Rα and M1 transformation, as the M1 phenotype is predominately found in the lipid core of the atherosclerotic plaque.

Break: 16:00-17:30 Poster Presentations
  • Track 5: Interventional Cardiology
Location: Aspen II
Speaker

Chair

Richard J. Frink

Heart Research Foundation of Sacramento, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jan F.C. Glatz

Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, The Netherlands

Session Introduction

Richard J. Frink

Heart Research Foundation of Sacramento, USA

Title: Parallel cholesterol crystals: A sign of impending plaque rupture

Time : 09:30-09:50

Speaker
Biography:

Richard J. Frink is the Principal Investigator of the Heart Research Foundation of Sacramento. He received his training at the University of Iowa, the Mayo Clinic and the University of Alabama in Birmingham. He practiced invasive cardiology in Sacramento, California for 35 years and established a laboratory to study the post-mortem heart. He has published approximately 25 research papers and a book, Inflammatory Atherosclerosis: Characteristics of the Injurious Agent, detailing the pathologic findings in patients who died of acute coronary disease. The primary focus of his work has been the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the mechanism responsible for sudden cardiac death.

Abstract:

Background. Currently, there are no reliable methods that can reliably predict when or if an atheroma will rupture. Recent reports suggest cholesterol crystals (CC's), present within the necrotic core, are sharp and can penetrate and disrupt the fibrous cap, contributing to plaque rupture (PR). Our aim is to show CC, normally distributed at random within the necrotic core, often develop a parallel configuration at the site of plaque rupture which may be a sign of impending rupture.
Materials and Results. The coronary arteries of 83 patients who died of acute coronary disease (ACD) were injected with a colored barium gelatin mass. The arteries were dissected, decalcified, cut at 2-3 mm intervals, and all segments mounted for microscopic study. All segments were reviewed to identify PR's and to determine the frequency of parallel cholesterol crystals (P-CCs) at the site of these PRs. There were 215 separate PRs in 83 patients with 64 (77%) patients showing more than one PR. P-CCs were present in 126 (59%) of all PRs regardless of plaque size or the severity of luminal stenosis and were present with or without luminal thrombosis. The parallel configuration appears to reflect increased intra-plaque pressure.

Jan F.C. Glatz

Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, The Netherlands

Title: Novel insights in the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism indicate therapeutic options for diabetic cardiomyopathy

Time : 09:50-10:10

Speaker
Biography:

Jan F C Glatz received his Ph.D. in metabolic biochemistry from Nijmegen University (1983). Currently he is Professor of Cardiac Metabolism at CARIM, Maastricht where he studies the regulation of cardiac energy metabolism in the healthy heart and in type 2 diabetes with focus on the role of substrate transporters. He has published >325 papers, organized several international conferences, is Editorial Board Member of a number of journals, and serves as President of the Society for Heart and Vascular Metabolism (SHVM).

Abstract:

Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death among obese and diabetic patients. Cardiac contractile dysfunction seen in this condition is referred to as diabetic cardiomyopathy and is caused primarily by the metabolic alterations occurring, i.e., insulin resistance (decreased glucose utilization) and accumulation of lipids (triacylglycerols) and lipid intermediates (diacylglycerols, ceramides) in cardiac myocytes (lipotoxicity). Currently there is no eff ective treatment counteracting myocardial lipid accumulation. Recent advances in our understanding of cardiac energy metabolism have indicated that specifi c transporters in the sarcolemma of cardiac myocytes are key players in the regulation of substrate uptake and utilization. Th e main transporters are GLUT4 for glucose and CD36 for long-chain fatty acids. Th e regulatory mechanism involves reversible translocation of the transporters from intracellular stores to the membrane to facilitate substrate uptake. In obesity and diabetes, CD36 is permanently located at the sarcolemma while GLUT4 resides intracellularly, which juxtaposition explains the changes in substrate preference. Our recent studies suggest that interventions in the traffi cking machinery that regulate cellular GLUT4 and CD36 distribution aimed at increasing sarcolemmal GLUT4 and/or decreasing sarcolemmal CD36 rectify the cardiac substrate balance and restore cardiac contractile function. Th us, overexpression in mouse hearts of protein kinase D, which is involved in GLUT4 but not CD36 translocation, protects against high fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Similarly, overexpression in cardiac myocytes of vesicleassociated membrane protein-3 (VAMP3) prevents the cells from lipid-induced insulin resistance. Th ese novel data disclose (the traffi cking of) substrate transporters GLUT4 and CD36 as promising therapeutic targets for diabetic cardiomyopathy.

Edmo Atique Gabriel

University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

Title: Cardiovascular surgery: Technical principles and inflammatory universe

Time : 10:10-10:30

Speaker
Biography:

Edmo Atique Gabriel, Ph.D., is a Brazilian cardiovascular surgeon, University Professor, cardiovascular surgery Consulting and editor of two textbooks by Springer-Principles of Pulmonary Protection in Heart Surgery (2010-2011) and Infl ammatory Response in Cardiovascular Surgery.

Abstract:

Acquired or congenital structural heart diseases have interaction with complex immunological defense systems. Th is interaction consists of a real battle in which the protagonists are cell receptors, adhesion molecules, cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, monoclonal antibodies, enzymes, hormones and growth factors. It is very oft en to observe concomitance between structural heart disease and some comorbidities such as hypertension, stroke, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, metabolic syndrome, cardiorenal syndro-me and pulmonary diseases arising from excessive smoking. Th us, one can postulate that there is some infl ammatory burden in patients will undergo cardiovascular surgery. Th is infl ammatory pattern is consistently higher, especially if one focuses on procedures associated with cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiovascular surgery has been understood not only as restricted set of technical principles, but also as surgical science of holistic character, comprising technical knowledge in association with immunological, molecular and infl ammatory aspects. Cardiovascular surgeon has become fully capable to refl ect on surgical strategy to be performed, aiming to minimize ischemiareperfusion in addition to prevent and modulate infl ammatory response intrinsically associated with surgical procedure, particularly when cardiopulmonary bypass support is employed. Th erefore, knowledge of underlying infl ammatory universe related to maneuvers and actions of cardiovascular surgeon is crucial to procedural outcome as well as cardiovascular patients´ prognosis.

Xiulan Su Lan Yu

Inner Mongolia Medical University, P.R. China

Title: Association of fourteen PPARr gene SNPs and hypertension in Mongolian population

Time : 10:30-10:50

Speaker
Biography:

Xiulan Su, Master-medicine, now is a Professor of Cell Biology, doctoral supervisor of Inner Mongolia Medical University and Capital University of Medical Science, Director of the Clinical Medical Research Center of the Affi liated Hospital, Inner Mongolia Medical University. Su has been devoted to genetics and metabolic diseases since her graduation in 1998. She participated in establishing two regional key laboratories, and then became director. Su won 9 awards on “Science and Technology Advancement Prize” at provincial or ministerial levels, one award on efforts to develop autonomous region by science, technology and education, a regional “pace-setter” of young scholars, an young outstanding contribution and expert, an young academic leader in health and medical, a regional March 8th red-banner pacesetter. She was chosen as fi rst level in regional “111”, “321” Project. She was named as the famous teacher in Inner Mongolia in 2009. Currently, Su chairs two projects from National Natural Science Foundation. She also chairs and participates in several regional and college research fund projects, one national “863” Project, two Sino-Japan cooperation projects, one Sino-German cooperation project. Su has published 115 papers, including 30 SCI indexed papers. Five students received doctor’s degree and 53 students received master’s degree under supervision from Su.

Abstract:

The association of PPARγ polymorphisms with hypertension in several populations is controversial. Th e aim of the present study was to clarify the contributions of PPARγ genetic variants to hypertension through an association study. A total of 385 unrelated Mongolian herdsmen and 523 Han farmers were included in this study. Fourteen SNPs were selected from the Chinese HapMap database based on pairwise r2 ≥ 0.5 with minor allele frequency ≥0.05. Th e SNPs were genotyped using a PCR/ligase detection reaction assay. Prior to correction for multiple testing, the SNP rs6802898 and rs12633551 were signifi cantly related to the prevalence of hypertension in the Han and Mongolian populations, respectively. Th e genetic association of each SNP with hypertension was individually tested using logistic regression. Th e SNP rs6802898 was associated with hypertension in both dominant (P=0.033) and additive models (P=0.026) in Han population, whereas rs12633551were associated with hypertension in both dominant (P=0.014) and additive models (P=0.0073) in the Mongolian population. Moreover, SNP rs12633551 had a signifi cant eff ect on systolic and diastolic blood pressure response. However, none of these associations was statistically signifi cant aft er Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Th ere was a signifi cant diff erence among the haplotypes in the Han and Mongolian population. Interestingly, there was an association of the PPARγ haplotypes with hypertension even aft er Bonferroni correction. Th us, determination of the PPARγ haplotypes in diff erent populations may prove informative for assessment of the genetic risk for hypertension.

Break: Coffee Break 10:50-11:05 @ Pine
Speaker
Biography:

Narasaiah Kolliputi is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Florida. He graduated from Osmania University, India, where he received doctoral degree in biochemistry. He received his postdoctoral training in MGH at Harvard Medical School. His present work at USF involves elucidating translational strategies to attenuate pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and acute lung injury (ALI). Kolliputi’s research is funded by NIH RO1 and American Heart Association Scientist Developmental grants.

Abstract:

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) is a progressive devastating disease characterized by excessive proliferation of the Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells (PASMCs). Studies suggest that PAH and cancers share an apoptosis-resistant state featuring excessive cell proliferation. MicroRNA-206 (miR-206) is known to regulate proliferation and is implicated in various types of cancers. However, the role of miR-206 in PAH has not been studied. In this study, it is hypothesized that miR-206 could play a role in the proliferation of PASMCs. In the present study, the expression patterns of miR-206 were investigated in normal and hypertensive mouse PASMCs. Th e eff ects of miR-206 in modulating cell proliferation, apoptosis and smooth muscle cell markers in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) were investigated in vitro. miR-206 expression in mouse PASMCs was correlated with an increase in right ventricular systolic pressure. Reduction of miR-206 levels in hPASMCs causes increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis and these eff ects were reversed by the overexpression of miR-206. miR-206 over expression also increased the levels of smooth muscle cell diff erentiation markers α-smooth muscle actin and calponin implicating its importance in the diff erentiation of SMCs. miR-206 overexpression down regulated Notch-3 expression, which is key a factor in PAH development. Th ese results suggest that miR-206 is a potential regulator of proliferation, apoptosis and diff erentiation of PASMCs, and that it could be used as a novel treatment strategy in PAH.

Murad Abdelsalam

Pinnacle Health Cardiovascular Institute, USA

Title: Minimally-invasive radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Murad Abdelsalam received his MD degree from the Al-Arab Medical University, Benghazi, Libya, and became an Associate faculty after graduation. Currently he is fi nishing his medicine residency at Harrisburg Hospital / Pinnacle Health System. During that time he joined Pinnacle Health Cardiovascular Institute as a research scientist and was involved with multiple project about Hybrid Coronary Revascularization and Atrial fi brillation radiofrequency ablation both using DaVici robotic assistance. He had multiple publication including original articles, case reports and abstracts in peer reviewed journal including JACC, Heart (BMJ) and Texas heart institute.

Abstract:

Atrial fi brillation(AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Nearly 2.2 million individuals in the United States and 4.5 million in the European Union have AF. In developed countries, the number of patients with AF is likely to increase during the next 50 years, owing to the growing proportion of elderly individuals. In AF, the normal regular electrical impulses generated by the sinoatrial node are overwhelmed by disorganized electrical impulses usually originating in the roots of the pulmonary veins, leading to irregular conduction of impulses to the ventricles which generate the heartbeat. Radio frequency ablation (RFA) is a medical procedure where part of the electrical conduction system of the heart tissue is ablated using the heat generated from the high frequency alternating current. Bipolar radiofrequency ablation is performed by clamping the tissue and heating it between the two electrodes until irreversible protein denaturation occurs, later the tissue dies and turns into a scar without causing collateral damage to surrounding tissues. We have conducted a retrospective study of 25 patients, who underwent minimally Invasive Bilateral Pulmonary Vein Isolation with left appendage exclusion either through a minithoracotomy or total thoracoscopic approach using Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation with average follow-up time of 18 months, which showed that the procedure is a feasible and eff ective treatment with encouraging long term results for selected patients with lone atrial fi brillation.

Speaker
Biography:

Monica V Marquezini is the Scientifi c Researcher at Pro-Blood Foundation of Blood Center of São Paulo since 1991. Is part of Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory-LPAE staff at the Department of Pathology, Medical School of University of São Paulo, Brazil, since 2010. Expert in Cellular and Molecular Biology with cell surface proteins studies and extracellular matrix research. Teacher of Cell and Molecular Biology themes at different graduation careers, Post-graduation advisor, and Coordinator of specialization courses and National and International Projects. Ph.D. in Science from the Federal University of São Paulo-School of Medicine UNIFESP-EPM (1996), M.Sc. in Molecular Biology UNIFESP-EPM (1987) and graduated in Biological Sciences Medical Modality from the University Methodist Piracicaba-UNIMEP, State of São Paul (1983).

Abstract:

Recent experimental data have provided associations between ambient PM2.5 (fi ne particulate matter; diameter ≤2.5μm) and propensity to infl ammation and chronic diseases especially among susceptible groups, such as elderly people. Th ere is cumulative evidence that type-2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic infl ammatory state aggravated by factors that promote endothelium infl ammation. Accordingly our hypothesis that the exposure of aged obese population to PM2.5 might aggravate type-2 diabetes, we tested this hypothesis in a model of diet-induced obesity where C57BL6 male mice were fed with regular chow (n=30; RC) or high-fat chow (n=36; HF) during one-year and randomly assigned to fi ltered (FA-RC, n=16; FA-HF, n=19) or PM2.5 concentrated air (600 μg.m-3) (EXP-RC, n=14; EXP-HF, n=17) daily during 1-hour for 30-days. Fast glycemia was measured before the animals were euthanized. All experimental procedures were approved by the Institution's Ethics Committee. Heart mRNA content of selected migration, signalization and adhesion proteins were measured by SYBR Green fl uorescence Real Time RT-PCR protocol using appropriate primers. Th ere were no diff erence between RC-EXP and RC-FA nor between HF-EXP and HF-FA body weight. Regarding fast glycemia, both, RC and HF groups, were diabetic, but only the HF group was aff ected by acute exposure to PM2.5 (mean±SD, EXP-HF vs FA-HF, 172.8±23.4 vs 156.7±17.6, p<0,05; EXP-RC vs FA-RC, 149.8±19.2, 139.7±15.3, ns; ANOVA). Th e expression profi le of the proteins studied, E-selectin, IL-6, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and MMP-9, were diff erent in heart and lung. Proteins activated by infl ammatory stimuli involved in the inhibition of insulin signaling are being investigated.

Marlene Shehata

Marlene Shehata Pharmaceuticals, Canada

Title: Prescribing for smoking cessation: What do pharmacists need to know?

Time : 12:25-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Marlene Shehata has received her Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, specializing in Genetics of Cardiovascular Diseases from the University of Ottawa during the period of 2004-2010. Shehata is also a licensed Ontario Pharmacist practicing in Southwestern Ontario. Currently, she is working as a Clinical Pharmacist Consultant in numerous academic hospitals, nursing homes and community pharmacies in Southwestern Ontario. She has successfully completed her Administrative responsibilities as a Manager for the Pharmacy and Clinical Services Department. She is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Pharmacology Research, Associate Editor for the Journal of Eco-biotechnology and The Journal of Biotechnology Applications. She sits on the editorial boards of numerous other journals including the International Archives of Medicine and the African Journal of Biotechnology. Shehata has authored 21 research articles, 2 book chapters and 24 abstracts. She is a member of the Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Cardiovascular Society, Ontario Pharmacists Association and Ontario College of Pharmacists. She is the 2011 recipient of the Certifi cate of Excellence by Hypertension Canada and the 2007 Horizon Award recipient by Memorial University of Newfoundland. She was awarded numerous other awards including the Pfi zer Canada, Canadian Hypertension Society (CHS) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Doctoral Research Award in 2005, the Ontario Graduate Scholarship in 2005, Merck Frosst Best Basic Science Presentation Award in 2006 and the Ontario Graduate Scholarship for Science and Technology in 2004 and 2006. Marlene was selected as one out of fi ve Canadian pharmacists’ fi nalists in Diabetes Management: Best Practices in Patient Care 2009 Competition; she was recognized on the “Volunteer Wall” on campus the University of Ottawa for sacrifi cially giving over 180 hours of volunteer work in the 2007 academic year. Her motivation, enthusiasm, and perseverance made her an ideal candidate for receiving the 2008 Have a Heart Bursary by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.

Abstract:

Pharmacists in Ontario were recently permitted to prescribe smoking cessation medications such as bupropion and varenicline. Pharmacotherapeutic options are used in heavy smokers and/or those who tried quitting in the past, but failed. Despite the usefulness of these prescription drugs in helping patients quit smoking, it is essential to know that success in smoking cessation is measured by the progress of the patient through the process of quitting, which is in turn dependent on a combination of behavioural strategies and pharmacotherapeutic approaches in a context of multiple counselling sessions. Behavioural strategies include assessing the patient’s willingness to quit smoking, knowing his/her past experiences with quitting, possible barriers to quitting and consistently encouraging and motivating the patient and positively boosting the patient’s self-esteem. As such, it is important to emphasize the need to spend time with the patient to encourage and celebrate their progress. Th ese behavioural strategies are equally important to pharmacotherapeutic options.

Speaker
Biography:

Manuela Stoicescu was Assistant Researcher at University of Cluj Napoca and now she is consultant internal medicine physician, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of University of Oradea, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medical Disciplines Department, Romania. Also work at Emergency Hospital Internal Medicine Department and Internal Medicine Offi ce. She has published two books, one monograph and papers in reputed journals. She was invited as a speaker at 9 national and 15 International conferences. She is Member of Romanian Society of Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Medical Chemistry, Biochemistry and Member of the Balkan Society of Medicine.

Abstract:

Objective: Th e main reason for the presentation of this clinical case was to discover the hidden diagnose of a young patient, who has presented a lipothymia during the sports class, while participating in the running trial. Material and Method: I am presenting the clinical case of a young man aged 24, who during the sports class in the university while he was participating in the running trial; suddenly he gets dizziness, accelerated heart rate, chest pain and a lipothymia, without losing consciousness. His colleagues intend to call the emergency service, but the young man suddenly gets better and refuses to be committed to the hospital. Aft er this incident he presents other two episodes of dizziness and accelerated heart rate, during the sports class, he goes to the family doctor and this send him to a specialist. During the consultation, I founded at the objective examination rhythmic heart sounds HR=82/min, mid systolic click in the mitral area, proto systolic murmur without irradiation, with character of vapor saltation, BP=120/80mmHg, normal vesicular sound. At the general objective examination the following are determined: the thorax shape-pectus excavatum and scoliosis, longline aspect, arachnodactylia, ligamentous hyper laxity, ogival palatal arch, dental malformations, blue sclera and wearing glasses. Th e EKG shows a sinus rhythm HR=78/ min and a minor right branch block, the cardiac Doppler echography shows a prolapse mitral valve, second degree mitral failure and unexpectedly a large interatrial septum aneurism and an interventricular septum aneurism. Th e thoracoabdominal CT that has been made was within normal limits. Th e postoperative evolution of the patient was favorable aft er the interatrial and interventricular septums have recasted. Result and Discussion: Th e mitral valve prolapse and the mitral regurgitation are diseases that are frequently observed in the Marfan syndrome, but the association with a interatrial and interventricular septums aneurisms is very uncommon and rare, actually. Conclusion: 1.Th e Marfan syndrome represents known but a very rare a genetic disease. 2. Th e mitral valve prolapse diagnose associated or not with a mitral failure is also usually. 3. Th e interatrial and interventricular septums aneurisms are very uncommon. 4. Th e diagnose is possible if the genetic sub layer of the disease is taken into account and specially the presence of the lax connective tissue in a large amount and ligamentous hyperlaxity, which could be valid in the case of interatrial sand interventricular septums, which are usually more lax and with an exaggerated mobility and can produce these kind of changes. 5. Th e thoracoabdominal CT has not shown any other aneurism in the aorta artery level. 6. Th e postoperative evolution has be favorable with the recast of the interatrial and interventricular septums.