Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Oceanography Orlando, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Award Ceremony
Location: International B
  • Coffee Break
Location: Atrium
  • Track 6: Ocean Resources Track 9: Marine Pollution & Management Track 10: Marine Biotechnology Track 11: Marine Renewable Energy Technology
Location: International B
Speaker

Chair

Nisreen. E. Mahmoud

Cairo University, Egypt

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jaysankar De

UNESCO Chair in Life Sciences International Postgraduate Educational Center, Armenia

Speaker
Biography:

Khairul Azam has completed his Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of Strathclyde, Glagow, U.K. He did his post doctoral from the University of Hull and University of Pertanian, Malaysisa. He worked as Researcher and Faculty for the last 27 years. He is a Professor at the University of Khulna, Bangladesh but presently on lien and working as Senior Faculty, School of Marine Studies, at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. He has numerous publications to his credit and has attended national and international seminars and workshops. He was the Dean, Life Science School at Khulna University during 2002-2004.

Abstract:

The change from traditional subsistence to semi-intensive is leading to an increase in the demand for aquaculture feeds. The culture of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii in Fiji as protein source and source of income for small-scale farmers is important. However, due to the unavailability and high cost of feed ingredients and formulated feeds, the supply and quality of feeds for aquaculture development is restricted. In addition, the lack of information on cost-effective channels to deliver feeds to farmers has contributed to the poor production and profitability. A nutritional study was conducted to evaluate growth performance of M. rosenbergii fed iso-energetic, low cost formulated diets, using locally available ingredients in ponds for 124 days. Two formulated (MBM+MM+CP-diet 1 and FM+Wht-diet 2) and two commercial (Crest tilapia pellet-diet 3 and Pacific prawn pellet - diet 4) diets were fed. The study indicated no significant differences for weight gain and survival rate (P ≥0.05). It was observed that diet 2 induced highest growth rate while the lowest FCR (0.97±0.02) value was obtained for the same diet. The survival of prawns ranged between 83.43 mm ± 5.55 and 89.26 mm ± 0.40 %. The highest prawn production was obtained with diet 2 at 0.16 kg/m2. The economic analysis of M. rosenbergii production showed that diet 2 was the least expensive (FJ$0.53) to produce 1 kg of prawn as compared to the commercial diets (Pacific Prawn feed -FJ$0.89 and Crest Tilapia feed - FJ$0.69). Therefore, this study suggests that M. rosenbergii growth was slightly improved when using the formulated diet 2 although the highest survival rate (89.26±0.40 %) was obtained from the formulated diet 1. Diet 2 may be recommended to the farmers for monoculture of M. rosenbergii in ponds in comparison to both commercial diets in Fiji.

Speaker
Biography:

Laurentius T. X. Lalamentik is the Dean of the Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science at Sam Ratulangi University Indonesia. He graduated in 1985 at Sam Ratulangi University and has Master’s Qualication at Facolta di Scienze, Universita Politecna delle Marche, Ancona, Italy in 2004. Since 1985 he is working on coral reef ecology.

Abstract:

Ratatotok Peninsula and its surrounding areas are integrated to South-East Minahasa District of North Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. 15 years hard coral and sea surface temperature data were collected respectively. In 1997, 2000 and 2010 the surface temperature was noted to rise about 2 - 3 degree of Celsius. The total coverage of hard corals was declined or tent to decline during those years. Although several other causes, i.e. bombing, poisoning, netting and Acanthaster plancii predation, were found also as reasons for coral destruction, bleaching events that occurred in 1997, 2000 and the latest one was occurred in 2010 could be blame as major factor that ruined the reefs in these area. Nevertheless, not all hard corals were affected. Compared to other Indonesian reef which were also affected by coral bleaching, most of coral genera attacked in this study area was the dominant genera, such as Acropora (at Ratatotok Peninsula and Hogow Island) and Galaxea (at Ratatotok Peninsula). It was very obvious that the bleaching events in those years were corresponded by increasing sea temperature. Sea temperature data were collected by using CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) data logger. However, after several months, it seemed that almost all of coral suffered from bleaching were survived. Strong current was probably the main key for the corals to survive from those bleaching events.

Break: Coffee Break 11:00-11:20 @ Atrium
Speaker
Biography:

Josef Bamidele Bolarinwa completed his B.Sc at 22 years of age from University of Ife, Nigeria. He has four Masters degree in Aquaculture & Fisheries, Business/Public Administration from Wageningen Agricultural University, Holland, Rivers State University of Science &Technology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Nigeria. He has 34 years of experience of lecturing. He is currently the Chief Lecturer/Dean of School of Agriculture, Lagos State Polytechnic, Nigeria. He has published 5 textbooks, 22 papers in reputed journals, 87 technical papers. He is the Fisheries Consultant to Ekiti and Ondo State governments of Nigeria.

Abstract:

This study describes the length-weight relationship (LWR) and condition factor (K) of seven (7) fish species of ecological and economic importance found in Ibeshe waterside area of Lagos lagoon, Nigeria. 154 specimens of Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus, Pomadasy jubelini, Elops lacerta, Cynoglossus senegalensis, Polydactylus quadrifilis, Gobius schlengii and Sphraena piscatorium were collected from the local fisher men for a period of two months (September 2012 to October 2012 and their total lengths (TL) and weights(W) recorded. The values of constants a and b were determined from the length and weight data when transformed into the growth equation: logW=loga+blogTL .The values of b for the fishes varied from -0.15 to 3.38. The growth pattern of Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus was represented by the equation Log W= 2.24-0.15 Log TL, Pomadasy jubelini by Log W = -2.32 + 3.38Log TL, Elops lacerta by Log W = 0.41 + 1.04 Log TL, Cynoglossus senegalensis by Log W = -1.37 + 2.37 Log TL), Polydactylus quadrifilis by Log W = -1.25 + 2.33 Log TL, Gobius schelegii by Log W = -1.62 + 2.74 Log TL and Sphraena piscatorium by Log W = -1.11 + 2.23Log TL. These values of “b” shows that most of the fishes collected from the Ibeshe waterside of Lagos lagoon displayed negative allometric growth pattern apart from Pomadasy jubelini. The condition factor (K), a reflection of the well being and degree of fatness ranged from 0.56 in Sphraena piscatorium to 1.62 in Pomadasy jubelini and all these condition factors fall outside the range recommended as suitable for matured fresh water species in the tropics. This might indicate that Ibeshe waterside may be environmentally unfavourable to fishes in the aquatic ecosystem.

Speaker
Biography:

Nisreen. E. Mahmoud has completed her Ph.D. in 1994. She is a professor of Parasitology in Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Cairo University - Egypt. She is a leading specialist of fish parasites. Her scientific interests include problems related to parasitic diseases and pollution in fresh water and marine aquacultures. She is an active participant of the international scientific conferences and symposiums. She has published more than 38 papers in reputed journals. Also a member of: Egyptian Society of Environment and Aquatic Animal Health, The Zoological Society A.R.E., The Fish Committee of the General Organization for Veterinary Services, Egypt, The Fish Committee for the solution of Lake Naser fish helminthes problems, Egypt, The Egyptian Society of Veterinary Parasitology.

Abstract:

Examination of 150 fish samples belonging to three families were collected from Mediterranean sea, Egypt and examined for larval Trypanorhynch Cestode infection from September 2011 till February 2012. Sixty three (42%) of the investigated fish were parasitized with different metacestode species belonging to Lacistorhynchidae and Tentaculariidae. All Trypanorhynch species were isolated from the muscles and abdominal cavities. The detected Callitetrarhynchus gracilis (Pintner, 1931) showed the highest prevalence (30%) and maximum intensity (37). Results revealed that, 46%; 44% and 36% of the examined fish species Epinephelus gigas; Sciaena umbra and Scomber scomber were infected respectively and were considered as new hosts records for the detected parasites. The collected C. gracilis and its host muscles (Epinephelus gigas) were analyzed for some heavy metals( Cu, Pb, and Cd) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer, the results indicated a significance higher concentration of the heavy metals in the parasite compared with its fish host. The present study has concluded for the 1st time that; the Trypanorhynch metacestode C. gracilis could be used as bioindicator of aquatic heavy metal pollution and adds further evidence to the usefulness of parasites in monitoring environmental impacts.

Speaker
Biography:

Elif Sekman is a faculty member and researcher at Yildiz Technical University in department of Environmental Engineering

Abstract:

Jaysankar De

UNESCO Chair in Life Sciences International Postgraduate Educational Center, Armenia

Title: Potential of marine bacteria in enhanced bioremediation

Time : 12:20-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Jaysankar De received his PhD in Marine Science from the Goa University (India) and did his doctoral research at the NIO (India) and GBF (Germany). He received the “Young Scientist” award at the 92nd Indian Science Congress in January, 2005. He did his postdoctoral research in Japan, USA, Sweden, and Armenia. He worked as a Scientist at the Vanevan Institute & Center for Ecological-Noosphere Studies in Armenia. He currently works as the Head (Dean) of the Biotechnology Department at the UNESCO Chair-LSIPEC, Armenia. He has several publications and a US patent; and serves in editorial boards of many reputed journals.

Abstract:

Global industrialization has resulted in a widespread contamination of the environment with constant addition of organic and inorganic wastes, either via natural processes or through human activities. These contaminants include excess nutrients, sewage and heavy metals, as well as synthetic organic compounds such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, tributyltin, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, etc. Bioremediation, a relatively new option among the emerging technologies, turned out to be economically viable, environmental friendly and value added process that could be applied for sensitive environments like wetlands, where conventional techniques are too disruptive. Marine environments are one of the most adverse environments due to their constantly varying physicochemical characters. Marine bacteria, owing to their continuous exposure to such environmental conditions possess complex characteristic features for adaptation and are more suitably adjusted to most of the adverse conditions. Therefore, many marine bacteria have the potential to be utilized in bioremediation of recalcitrant chemicals through precipitation, volatilization, physical exclusion of electronegative components in membranes and extracellular polymeric substances, energy-dependent efflux systems, intracellular sequestration with proteins, enzymatic degradation, and formation of biofilm, etc. The advantage of using marine bacteria for bioremediation in situ is the direct use of organisms without any considerable genetic manipulation. Perhaps the bestknown example of such bioremediation took place during the cleanup of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, when fertilizer was used to enhance the breakdown of oil by naturally occurring bacteria. The application of marine bacteria to environmental problems represents an area of potentially great importance, for both environmental and economic reasons.

Break: Lunch Break 12:40-13:25 @ Atrium

Lilit Vardanyan

UNESCO Chair in Life Sciences International Postgraduate Educational Center, Armenia

Title: Importance of aquatic macrophytes in controlling water quality

Time : 13:25-13:45

Speaker
Biography:

Lilit Vardanyan has completed her Ph.D. from Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and did her doctoral research at the Institute of Hydroecology and Ichthyology NAS Armenia, University of Hohenheim in Germany, National Institute of Oceanography in India and Israel Nature Parks in Israel. She has been twice awarded from Indian National Science Academy, INTAS, DAAD (the German Academic Exchange Service). She did her postdoctoral research in Germany and Sweden. Currently she holds a position of Leading Scientist at the UNESCO Chair- LSIPEC, Armenia. She has several publications in per reviewed international scientific journals.

Abstract:

Bioavailability and bioaccumulation of heavy metals in aquatic ecosystems is gaining tremendous significance globally. Several of the submerged, emergent and free-floating aquatic macrophytes are known to accumulate and bioconcentrate heavy metals and serve as useful indicators of water pollution. They are unchangeable biological filters and they carry out purification of the water bodies by accumulating dissolved metals and toxins in their tissue. Macrophytes take up heavy metals mainly through the roots, although uptake through the leaves may also be of significance. Aquatic plants often grow more vigorously where nutrient loading is high. They are capable of removing water-soluble substances from solution and temporarily immobilizing them within a living system. This study was focused on assessment of metals accumulation in certain aquatic macrophytes (biomonitors), in comparison with water and sediment (abiotic monitors) of Lake Sevan, Armenia. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu and Pb were measured in water, sediment and plant samples, namely in stems and leaves of Potamogeton pectinatus, Polygonum amphibium L., Lycopus europaeus L., Lemna minor, Typha angustifolia L. and Typha latifolia L. The concentrations of all investigated metals were higher in sediment than in water. Most of the heavy metals tend to get accumulated maximum in root whereas flower shows minimum accumulation. The application of macrophytes can be possible in finding of solutions for problems of protection, sanitation and revitalization of different aquatic ecosystems and in in reducing the effect of high concentration of metal in the environment.

Qinghua Liu

Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Title: Marine fish genetic resources cryoperservation and application in breeding

Time : 13:45-14:05

Speaker
Biography:

Qinghua Liu, associated professor, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Her reseach areas are: fish reproductive physiology, reproduction and development of marine fish species. She has published more than 40 papers in some reputed journals.

Abstract:

Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the precursors of gametes responsible for genetic transmission to the next generation. They provide an ideal system for cryopreservation and restoration of biodiversity. Recently, considerable attention has been raised to isolation, cryopreservation and transplantation of PGCs between species. However, the specification and development of PGCs remain elusive in marine economic fish species, impeding the development of PGCs manipulation technology in those species. In order to obtain the basic information of PGCs and put forward the manipulation technology, the development of PGCs was analized in two marine fish species by germ cell specific genes. We cloned vasa and dnd gene in turbot and the red seabream. By whole mount in situ hybridization, we have illustrated the specification and migration of the PGCs in turbot and the red seabream. Besides, we also investigated the function of the red seabream vasa transcriptional regulatory sequences (Pmvas), using medaka as a model system. We proved that the Pmvas was able to label the PGCs in medaka by GFP-Pmvas3’UTR mRNA microinjection and transgenic fish production under control of Pmvas. Furthermore, we isolated and cryopreserved the labeled PGCs and spermatogonia successfully. The results serve for the germ cell manipulation and provide an ideal alternative method for preservation of genetic resource of marine fish.

Speaker
Biography:

George Schroeder MD is a graduate of the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in addition to having earned a M.S. in Healthcare Management from the University of Texas School of Graduate Management, affiliated with the South Western Medical School, Dallas, Texas. He is a member of the Beta Gama Sigma International Honor Society 2008. Currently he serves as Executive Director of Medical Affairs for the American Academy of Urgent Care Medicine, as well as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Urgent Care Medicine. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine, in Orlando, Florida. He has published and lectured on Marine Toxins and Aquatic Hazards. He is President & CEO of Global Renaissance Enterprises Corp. He was appointed by the Executive Department of the Governor of the State of Florida to the State Pharmaceutical & Therapeutics Committee in September 2009.

Abstract:

Bioprospecting for bioactive compounds with potent pharmacological and nutraceutical properties, from an enormous untapped source of marine organisms, represents a formidable millennial challenge. This necessitates a focused, multidisciplinary pursuit of the vast marine biochemical diversity and harnessing it for prospective, as well as proven therapeutic potential. Beyond this frontier lies the ocean sub-seafloor, with marine sediments holding a significant organic carbon reservoir and a phenomenal biodiversity of microorganisms on our planet. An estimate of up to 1/3 of the actively living Biomass on earth thrives beneath the sea floor. Microbial cells were retrieved and recorded to a depth of 1.6 kilometers below the ocean floor, with an age up to 116 million years. As the most diverse and abundant Life forms, marine microbes are key drivers of biochemical cycles. The deep biosphere comprises the last major frontier for biological exploration. These marine, and deep sub seafloor microbes must survive extreme environmental conditions of very high pressure, temperature, particularly in proximity to ‘black smokers’, deep ocean volcanic hydrothermal vents, and prolonged starvation and absence of sunlight. Intrinsically generated bioluminescence among organisms even in the deepest ocean depths requires further study and evaluation. This fascinating Biodiversity may yield metabolic potentials, along with functional genes, which could be critical for the new discovery of bio catalytic capacities, or bioactive compounds with practical relevance to understanding and resolving seemingly insurmountable challenges in bio medical sciences, such as the burgeoning dangers of antimicrobial drug resistance, cytotoxicity. We must continue to forge ahead to promulgate the unlimited potential of Marine Genomics, Biomolecular chemical analysis, with a focus on potent marine toxins which will also contribute to the wealth of secondary metabolites, which may then be synthesized in vitro, without future harm to their original host macro organisms. Case in point, the isolation of apoaeqourin from jellyfish, later synthesized in a terrestrial American Laboratory in Wisconsin, to produce a marine-derived protein used as a supplement to prevent senescent cognitive, human memory decline in middle-aged and older patients. Physiological effects of cascades of metabolites may have possible practical applications, as for example bioactive molecules such as for example, Jorumycin, an isoquinolone alkaloid, exhibiting antitumor activity against cell lines derived from common human solid tumors, as well as a variety of blood dyscrasias and Leukemia. Chronic pain therapy by means of peptide chains derived from conotoxins, and extracted from marine toxins contained in oceanic cone shells (Max Plank Institute - Florida) (Ziconitide-{PRIALT} - a synthetic product identical to w-conotoxin used in chronic pain therapy administered via an I.V. infusion pump to patients suffering chronic pain.

Ishaq S. Eneji

University of Agriculture, Nigeria

Title: Assessment of water quality parameters in two Nigerian major rivers

Time : 14:25-14:45

Speaker
Biography:

Ishaq S. Eneji has completed his Ph.D. in the year 2010, at the age of 45 years from University of Agriculture, Makurdi Nigeria. He is currently the Head, Department of Chemistry University of Agriculture Makurdi Nigeria. He has published more than 22 papers in reputed journals. One of his publications was among the top 20 most cited paper in Environmental Monitoring and Assessment in 2012 (Titled: As assessment of heavy metals loading in River Benue in the Makurdi metropolitan Area in Central Nigeria). He is serving as an reviewer of Journal of Chemical Society of Nigeria.

Abstract:

Water quality parameters of two major rivers (River Benue and River Niger) were investigated for two seasons (rainy and dry seasons) using standard methods. The ranges of results in both rivers for the rainy season are as follows: turbidity, 12 - 90NTU; electrical conductivity, 48.4 - 74.0μS/cm; DO, 5.2 - 6.0mg/L; BOD, 59 - 70mg/L; COD, 122 - 144mg/L; alkalinity, 0.8 - 3.8mg/L; pH, 7.2 - 7.7; chloride, 3.5 - 5.8mg/L; phosphate, 4. - 10.4mg/L; total hardness, 40 - 80mg/L; TDS, 19 - 35mg/L; TSS, 130 - 220mg/L. The ranges of results in the two rivers for the dry season are as follows: turbidity, 7 - 59NTU; electrical conductivity, 63.8 - 74.2 μS /cm; DO, 4.9 - 5.8mg/L; BOD, 48 - 66mg/L; COD, 102 - 134mg/L; alkalinity, 1.0 - 1.8mg/L; pH, 7.2 - 7.6; chloride, 2.29 - 5.14mg/L; phosphate, 0.96 - 1.36mg/L; total hardness, 80 - 120mg/L; TDS, 28.4 - 42.8mg/L; TSS, 80 - 160mg/L. The results showed that most of the parameters are within the permissible limits specified by National Guideline and standards for Water Quality while COD, BOD and phosphate, alkalinity and TSS fall outside the specified permissible limits.

Michael Kashu Tesffzgi

Eritrea Fisheries Corporation, Eritrea

Title: Marine Resources in Eritrea: Performance, Potential & Prospectus

Time : 14:45-15:05

Speaker
Biography:

Michael Kahsu Tesfazgi has completed his studies in Aquaculture at the Eritrea College of Marine Science and Technology in 2009. He is the member of the research and technical staff at the Eritrea National Fisheries Corporation that operates under the Eritrea ministry of Marine resources.

Abstract:

Marine resources are very important from the point of view of food and Economic security, especially in developing countries. Most of the countries that have an access to oceans and seas are using different methods and techniques to exploit their marine resources to achieve their food security and develop their economy. Eritrea as one of the countries that has sea gate, also aims at using its marine resources to achieve food security and healing its devastated economy. Eritrea has a coastline of more than 1,100 km long in The Red Sea. The Eritrean part of the Red Sea is one of the underexploited potential marine resources in the world. Although an extensive research and detailed scientific data is lacked, it is stated that Eritrea has the potential of maximum sustainable yield of 80,000 metric tons of fishery and numerous Marine resources. But so far, is exploiting only less than 13% of this potential. So it is safe to assume that, the Eritrean marine resources not yet optimally exploited. Therefore, it is an underutilized resource of the country as it does not yet contribute much towards food security and economic development of the country. This paper will examine the performance, potential and prospects of Eritrean marine resources and look at the main physical constraints in marine resource management and the current technology such as the crafts and gear used associated with it. The paper also looks into the relationship of these factors and the necessary steps that has to be taken to enhance marine resource potential and prospectus in Eritrea.